Questions tagged [auxiliary-verbs]

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How can we say modals are of category T, but auxiliaries are really verbs? [duplicate]

Are there any arguments or theories to account for it?
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1answer
86 views

Pattern of use of modal verbs across languages

So I am toying with language and understand how to treat basic verbs and nouns and adjectives. But I am stuck on modal verbs like "I should have gone home". I would like to know basically a cheat ...
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0answers
51 views

A question about Carnie's subcategories and features

From Carnie's "Syntax: A Generative Introduction": This notation is not explicitly explained. What does it mean? (I'll write my conjecture below) Recall that T is defined as follows: So I guess the ...
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1answer
756 views

Can the first auxiliary verb be the specifier of a VP in the X-Bar theory?

As far as I know, the first auxiliary is normally treated as the head of a verb phrase (VP) in the X-Bar theory. He was writing a letter. In this sentence, for example, the first auxiliary, was, ...
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1answer
849 views

What is the difference between lexical verb and copular verb?

What is the difference between "lexical verb" and "copular verb"? Based on this source it seems that lexical verb it is just a simple verb (run, go, jump etc.) "For example: He went to the store. ...
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Copulas and the Split VP Hypothesis

Copulas are regarded as semantically vacuous auxiliaries merged in V, then raised to T. Lexical verbs are merged in V and are raised to v. I have not found any literature discussing the copula with ...
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1answer
2k views

Auxiliaries in generative grammar

In a course of introduction to Generative Grammar, my teacher told that auxiliary (Aux in the tree diagram) is the element that comes before the subject (NP) in an interrogative sentence. But I found ...
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1answer
306 views

Why is it that the wh-word as a subject in the spec position cannot raise over an auxiliary verb like 'did'?

When the question word is the subject of the clause, there is no aux verb, eg 'Who saw you?'. I understand this, but why is 'who did see you?' also correct, with respect to Chomsky's linguistic theory ...
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2answers
203 views

What is the meaning difference between have+V versus bare V?

In some dialects of English, there seems to be a clear(er) difference between past tense verbs with the auxiliary have as in “I have eaten the pie”, and those without, as in “I ate the pie”. The only ...
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0answers
60 views

French Auxiliary Selection. Theoretical explanations?

I've heard that Generative Approaches trying to explain Auxiliary Selection are mostly focused in Italian, because its a language which intransitive verbs respond pretty well to unaccusativity ...
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5answers
699 views

Do auxiliary verbs always express different aspect/mood/tense?

Do auxiliary verbs always serve to express a mood or aspect that is different from simple indicative (or a tense)? Or are there cases where a sentence is in simple-indicative-present with the presence ...
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0answers
79 views

“Two tier” theoretical epistemic modality

Quite recently I have noticed that most Bavarian verbs can become theoretical epistemic modal. What I mean by that is that you can take any verb, e.g. "[i] ko" - "[I] can", and turn it into it's ...
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111 views

Is there any language where the “copula” is also identical with and function as an “auxiliary verb”?

Are there languages where the "copula" is: invariant morphologically but may be phonologically conditioned (not inflected for any features like tense, number, etc. like English "is/was/were"), ...
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1answer
145 views

If two verbs are in a row, is the first always an Auxiliary? [closed]

Consider the sentence: He has gone. This is one of the example auxiliary verb sentences from: "Radford, A. English syntax: An introduction, Cambridge University Press, 2004" has is an auxiliary ...
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2answers
496 views

Why is 'be' sometimes the auxiliary verb for the present perfect?

1. Why do these 16 verbs require être as the auxiliary verb, to form the passé composé in French? 2. Abbreviated as DMPRRS, these 6 (of the 16) are ambitransitive. When transitive, their auxiliary ...
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1answer
1k views

Are there any languages that don't have/use auxiliaries?

Question pretty much says it all, I'm curious as to whether every language uses/requires auxiliary verbs to express tense/modality/aspect etc.? Thanks.
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1answer
169 views

Different kinds of do's

At first I thought that there was only such a thing as lexical do and periphrastic, but recently I stumbled upon something else (unfortunately I do not recall what it was called). Whatever be the case,...