Questions tagged [declension]

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Group (in)flexion (Gruppenflexion) in Slavic?

Even in works by Slavic linguists, when the concept of group infexion is discussed (eg Mel'čuk) the examples are from "exotic" languages (some also mention the English possessive 's, though ...
Attila the Pun's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
221 views

What is the behind the declension "obrovskýma" in the phrase "obrovskýma očima" in Czech?

I stumbled upon this phrase in a book. I then looked at Wiktionary under obrovský, and noticed that the form "obrovskýma" does not appear there. As far as I can tell it is the neuter plural ...
Pux's user avatar
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0 answers
41 views

Czech declension of Masculine Names ending in -a

I have come across several examples where at least in the genitive of a two-word phrase the name ending -a does not decline, e.g., svatého Sáva (vs. standard and more common Sávy), Alexandra (or ...
Attila the Pun's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
55 views

What is the origin of Marathi and Konkani case endings (specifically genitive and accusative-dative)?

In Konkani and Marathi, the genitive case ending is -च (cha) with a vowel attached to the end depending on the gender. I am curious to know the origin of this case ending. Is there potential of a ...
Mr Jangoon's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
83 views

How to deal with modern Indian people's first names and surnames when declining in Sanskrit?

I have a question about how to deal with people's names when using Sanskrit in a modern context. Let's say I want to say "Ãnanda is in the forest", I can say वन आनन्दः. Ignoring any possible ...
elbord77's user avatar
  • 204
1 vote
2 answers
127 views

Possible Sanskrit word "pas" as declension case [closed]

I would like to ask if it is possible that the word pas, which I think could be a Sanskrit word, is a declined case of an existing word (e.g. the nominative or vocative case). If not, could it be a ...
user3764418's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
286 views

Why does Proto-Indo-Aryan *ẓ seem to have different outcomes despite sharing the same phonological context?

It is well known that Proto-Indo-Aryan *s had an allophone *z in voiced contexts. Due to some phonetic changes (i.e. RUKI law and the shift *śt > ṣṭ), they both could undergo retroflexion, thus ...
Tochtli's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
113 views

Declension of Sanskrit words "kil" and "kila"

I have been using this search engine for Sanskrit grammar: https://sanskrit.inria.fr/DICO/grammar.html, specifically declension, and I was wondering about some results returned by the search. Indeed, ...
user3764418's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
163 views

How does case inflection work on the head noun in internally headed relative clauses?

I have read that some languages use internally headed relative clauses; so, for example, instead of saying "the man that we met yesterday went home today"; they position the shared noun in a ...
noah johnson's user avatar
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1 answer
161 views

Is there reason to believe that English will drop declension of personal pronouns "soon?" [closed]

I am sure I am not alone in having to think about whether to use "I" or "me" etc. and I also I sure I and others get it wrong frequently. What's really the point in retaining these ...
releseabe's user avatar
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5 votes
3 answers
390 views

Can an object be in functional case A even though it's declined like case B?

Pardon my word choice, since I'm obviously lacking the background in linguistics. I know that language-specific questions are off-topic, yet I still like to use Finnish as an example, since it spawned ...
infinitezero's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
714 views

Are there commonly accepted graphic symbols for common declension forms?

Some linguistic declension forms are found in many languages: Gender Singular / Plural Past, Present, Future Indication, Condition, Imperation Case: Nominative, Accusative, Dative etc. Is there a ...
Jonas Sourlier's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
429 views

Historical explanations for soft/hard declensions in Czech

Declension patterns in Czech is traditionally categorized into hard and soft ones based on the final consonant of the stem. Materials for learners, e.g., Lída's Czech Step by Step or Michael's ...
Pteromys's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
764 views

Words with "hybrid" declension (in Latin, or borrowed by English from Latin)?

There is a recently-coined technical usage (in mathematics) of the word "anima", borrowed from Latin to English. The funny thing about this coinage is that the coin-ers of the term insist on ...
Tim Campion's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
791 views

Is it possible in Sanskrit to distinguish between the names Rāma and Rām i.e. राम and राम् when used in a sentence?

Consider this sentence: रामो लेखन्या लिखति Is रामो in that sentence always referring to someone named राम (Rāma) or could it be equally possible that the person's name was राम् (Rām)? Are names like ...
MangoLover's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
580 views

How did Latin drop noun declension?

Latin has/had noun cases, while modern Romance languages don't. I wonder if the transition can be observed in written forms. Are there examples from different historic moments? A side question: ...
culebrón's user avatar
  • 153
4 votes
1 answer
918 views

What is the meaning of the Latin names of grammatical cases (in general, not in Latin)?

I cannot find any source explaining the Latin names of grammatical cases. I am especially curious in the names of the less common cases, like in Finnish: nominative genitive accusative partitive ...
Honza Zidek's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
208 views

Is a language without inflection a language without subject?

Subject is defined as the argument which agrees with the affixes of the verb. But if a language does not have inflectional affixes, can you state that this particular language does not have syntactic ...
amegnunsen's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
107 views

Is there a language where in declension number is affixed peripherally to case?

Is there a language where, given that number and case are affixed seperately not fusionally, a noun can have the structure of , e.g. ithawen = itha-w-en [woman]+GEN+PL ("of the women, the women's")? I ...
Abas's user avatar
  • 215
0 votes
0 answers
98 views

How do I decline a noun phrase?

First, let me say that I'm bad at grammar. Everything I know about grammar I've learned because I want to make my own languages. Second, I've created an ergative-absolutive language (I'm learning as ...
z2a's user avatar
  • 173
4 votes
0 answers
120 views

How is declension class represented in Distributed Morphology?

Does somebody knows a good paper or textbook that would have a Distributed Morphology (DM) approach to declension class? Ora Matushansky writes that it is an "underlying nominal property influencing ...
varya's user avatar
  • 41
13 votes
5 answers
2k views

Are there natural languages with the following properties (seen in Esperanto)?

Are there natural languages that have the following set of properties: The language possesses nouns, adjectives, and definite articles Nouns and adjective are both inflected for number and case (or ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
10 votes
4 answers
661 views

Languages preserving loanword inflections

Erudite English has an interesting practice where the plural form of loanwords may follow the inflectional grammar of the source language. Thus "campi" as well as "campuses", "minima" as well as "...
melissa_boiko's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
274 views

Origin of gen./abl. "pitur" genitive of "pitā́" ("father") in Sanskrit

How did the Sanskrit gen./abl. singular of pitr-/pitā́ ("father") came to be pitur (and the genitive of the entire noun class as well, of course)? The evolution of all other forms (even pitā́, which ...
Eleshar's user avatar
  • 2,363
7 votes
1 answer
2k views

Declensions in Polish

Declension, as far as I know, corresponds to the act of creating boxes where you can pile up nouns that follow the same rule when inflected (generally due to cases). Classical Latin is often said to ...
QuantumBrick's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
230 views

What is it called when one "conjugates" adjectives?

If one conjugates verbs and declines nouns, what is it called when an adjective is "conjugated," as it is in French to agree in gender and plurality with the noun? (E.g. "beau" is masculine singular ...
Morella Almånd's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
299 views

Are there languages with more cases than Latin?

I am currently busy with a project that involves production rules. From my years in Latin at college, I learned about the six basic ones. But if I am not confused, ablative could represent several ...
GerardLvy's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
619 views

What is the origin of declension/conjugation classes?

Languages with declension and conjugation usually have multiple declension and conjugation classes. If one were to invent a language with declension or conjugation, one would probably introduce only ...
Honza Zidek's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
72 views

Old Norse kné: a- stem or wa- stem?

The neuter noun kné follows a-stem declension. But it comes from Proto-Germanic *knewą. This seems to be a wa-stem. Then why does it follow a-stem declension? Did Scandinavians force it to, even ...
hello all's user avatar
  • 203
8 votes
3 answers
1k views

Is there something deeper behind the “verb classes swapping” of the subjunctive endings in Romance languages?

I first asked this question in https://spanish.stackexchange.com/q/15929/11155 However the Spanish community has not found any answer yet and the phenomenon is observable in many Romance languages. I ...
Honza Zidek's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
494 views

declining numerals in Old English

Disclaimer : this thread is perhaps off-topic. I thank you for your indulgence since I couldn't ask such a question on https://english.stackexchange.com/ . I read in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, in the ...
suizokukan's user avatar
  • 2,007
0 votes
4 answers
597 views

Plural form declension with numbers in Turkish

When naming some number of objects, there's only one plural form in English (2 dogs, 3 dogs, 10 dogs). But in Slavic languages like Polish the form changes depending on the number (2 psy, 4 psy, 5 ...
Павле's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
350 views

Old Norse: Noun declension gen. sg. -s or -ar?

I am using A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic and An Introduction to Old Norse (by E. V. Gordon) as my resoources. In An Introduction, it is said that: Some nouns declined otherwise as ...
hello all's user avatar
  • 203
0 votes
1 answer
58 views

Common change of conjugation of the verbs in spoken languages?

Is the natural tendency of the verbs in spoken language towards more or fewer conjugations? For example, in my language, we use conjugations related to time, person, etc. In English we have ...
Apprentice's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
495 views

Is there some intrinsic relationship between the nominative plural and genitive singular?

In Latin the similarity between the nominative plural and genitive singular is most striking: First: porta (Nom/Sing) and portae (Nom/Pl), portae (Gen/Sing) and portarum (Gen/Pl) Second: servus (Nom/...
Ryan David Ward's user avatar
25 votes
9 answers
18k views

Why did English lose declensions while German retained them?

Why did (or more specifically what caused) English lose declensions whilst they were retained in German? I ask as I have recently been reading into the various Germanic languages and it struck me that ...
user2521439's user avatar