Questions tagged [diachronic]

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What's the name of the effect where linguistic diversity is far more pronounced in a language's homeland?

I've always just used the term "homeland effect" for this, but websearches suggest that that is not actually its name and probably something I made up at some point. What I'm talking about ...
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66 views

Does a synchronically reduced or diachronically changed trill /r/ often become an [ɾ] rather than [ʐ] and why?

In the phonology of a series of languages, /r/ exists as a trill, and is reduced into a flap in informal speeches or in a syllable-final position. Why is it happened to be a flap, not a fricative? I ...
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32 views

vocabulary and notation for syntactic changes

As a layman I have picked up the terminology and notation for changes in phonology. But I know very little about diachronic changes in syntax other than that they happen: things like shift from SOV ...
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1answer
64 views

Is morphology always attributable to phonological processes?

I am wondering if you can justify the development of most/all morphemes to regular phonological processes if you argue that diachronically those environments existed and have just been lost in modern ...
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1answer
95 views

How did Norwegian “huske” derive from ON “hugsa”?

In Norse and Norwegian both, hug means "memory". Norse hugsa and Nynorsk hugse is "to remember". Is there a reason that s was attached? I can't think of any other verbs derived from nouns in this ...
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57 views

What to reference for grammatical features being more reliable than lexical features for diachronic research?

I often hear people mention in passing that grammatical features are more reliable than lexical features in diachronic research, specifically when detecting pseudepigraphs, because it is relatively ...
2
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1answer
273 views

Different assimilation directions

Here's a question I posed to a prominent researcher in French phonology during my undergrad. We didn't spend a ton of time on it, but we couldn't come up with a satisfactory solution. Now that I've ...
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2answers
669 views

When did Aspirated Consonants appear in English?

As stated here : (in English) "The voiceless stops /p/, /t/, /k/ are typically aspirated when they begin a stressed syllable, becoming [pʰ], [tʰ], [kʰ] [...]" Since these consonants weren't ...
14
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1answer
229 views

Are there any rankings of languages' rates of change?

This question involves the commonest languages still used in 2015. Prof. John McWhorter and this answer argue different rates of language change, e.g. the language change from Old Norse to ...
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2answers
493 views

Difference between “Leiden school” and “mainstream” Indo-Europeanists?

Recently, I've been asked what the difference between the "Leiden school" and "mainstream" Indo-Europeanists is. The asker is planning to study in Leiden and has been concerned with the many vague ...
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203 views

Stability of palatalized consonants

Some palatalized consonants seem to have a greater tendency to "absorb" their palatalization (in various ways) than others. For example, in standard Japanese, the former palatalized alveolars tj, dj, ...
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2answers
235 views

What is the linguistic process behind prolonging of vowels?

Vowels can change from short vowels to long vowels in time But from a diachronic perspective, what is happening? Please fill in with some examples of vowels that have been prolonged and that have ...
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248 views

Time annotated corpus: plain text english corpus

I am working on how entities take a new sense over time. I am trying to find out a large english corpus (free to download) which should have the time annotation of the origin of the text. I suppose ...
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4answers
2k views

Do languages change at different rates?

Do some languages change more slowly or quickly than others? If so, what factors slow or accelerate the rate of change? (For this question, let's forget about the possible effects of modern mass ...
11
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2answers
228 views

Is there any evidence that modern telecommunication slows dialect differentiation?

Consider the area that includes Western Washington and Western Oregon. As many of us know, most English-speakers who were raised in this area speak more or less the same variety of English. ...