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Questions tagged [english]

A Germanic language, which originated from England, and is considered the leading language in international communication.

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1answer
82 views

Why does anger has something to do with spleen in both Chinese and English?

The English word spleen has two meanings in Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary, an organ near the stomach which produces and cleans the body's blood. a feeling of anger and disagreement. ...
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3answers
70 views

Some “LINGUISTIQUE formulas” to translate French texts into English?

I am not sure is it correct to ask my question here or not! I've asked this question here (in MathStackExchange) before! Maybe it is better to see the question there, because it was written ...
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1answer
109 views

Why is it “untenable” and not “untainable” in English?

I am aware that words like "obtain," "retain," and "contain" are related to the root "tenere" meaning "to have." What (if anything) determines if the "ten" goes to "tain" in English? We have words ...
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76 views

When did “lawyer” begin to be pronounced as “loy-er” as opposed to “law-yer”, and why? [closed]

The same question goes for "sawyer". It's my understanding that this is usually the case with words that were slang derivatives but ended up making their way into official dictionaries as a result ...
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0answers
22 views

Is there a term for syntactically and semantically linked modifying phrases?

What I'm talking about is when a string of prepositional phrases take the object of the previous one as their antecedent, and where the entire string is linked back to the original antecedent, a noun ...
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0answers
32 views

Subcategorisation Frame with DPs

I want to construct a subcatagorisation frame for some words, for example that take a DP complement. Take the preposition "between" as example. I arrive at this point: Form: "...
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3answers
132 views

From Old French -iss into English -ish

I have read this information on the word perish: "mid-13c., from periss- present participle stem of Old French perir" And this comment is below a question of mine on English Language & Usage ...
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35 views

Diacope Confusion

I'm a little confused by diacope as a rhetorical feature. All examples I can find are short simple sentences "drill baby drill" for example. I'm trying to work out what the correct term would be to ...
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0answers
68 views

Are there any unattested, reconstructed Middle English words?

Are there any unattested Middle English words that were attested in Early Modern English? I'm asking this because, on Wiktionary, I saw that there are only 2 words: the F word and halibut that have ...
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22 views

The difference betWeen the writting and pronunciation [duplicate]

Why is English "W" written as two "V" but pronounced as "double U"?
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1answer
96 views

How to understand “otherwise experience very largely” in the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis? [closed]

I’m a Chinese and can’t understand a classic text from The Status Of Linguistics As A Science (1929) by Edward Sapir. We see and hear and otherwise experience very largely as we do because the ...
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1answer
82 views

Does understanding in Russian imply understanding in English? [closed]

I am a native Russian speaker. There is a Past Continuous as well as a Past Simple tense in Russian, does that mean that my brain understands how the tenses work in English too? (English is not my ...
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1answer
85 views

What are the semantic functions of a complementizer phrase (CP)

What does semantic functions mean? and what are they for a CP? Thank you
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1answer
93 views

Nouns used as verbs.What is this process called?

I am milking the cow He is watering the garden In English many nouns can be used as verbs.some languages I know , for example, Hindi, does not have this facility. What is the process of nouns ...
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1answer
5k views

Is it unusual that English uses possessive for past tense?

When learning some basic French, I was somewhat surprised to learn that phrases of the form "I have found the cat" generally translate almost word-for-word from English (J'ai trouvé le chat). To me, ...
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0answers
30 views

Usage of the implicit object-subordinate clause in Italian (i.e. Usage of the implicit objective subordinate clause in English - part II)

In a sense, the following question is a sequel of this one: Usage of the implicit objective subordinate clause in English. In that question I asked some information about the usage of the implicite ...
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3answers
2k views

Why do adjectives come before nouns in English?

Why does the attributive adjective come before a noun in English? In most languages, the adjective comes always after a noun. For example, white car is written as the equivalent of car white in Latin ...
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1answer
127 views

Is to always a preposition? [closed]

[1] I am looking forward to seeing you. [2] I want to see you. In the sentence [1] we say that to is a preposition. followed by a gerund. In [2] we say to is a particle ...
45
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3answers
12k views

Why do English transliterations of Arabic names have so many Qs in them?

I remember when the Muslim holy book was the Koran when I was in middle school, but now it's the Quran. But it's always been Qatar and Iraq (but still Kuwait.) Who decided that 'Q' was going to be ...
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2answers
112 views

How many sound-to-letter sequence mapping rules does English have compared to other languages?

In English (I haven't really thought too much about English yet), there are tons of what-seem-like one-off patterns. (the "oo" sound) tool /tul/ two /tu/ to /tu/ through /θɹu/ blue /blu/ queue /ku/ (...
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1answer
35 views

Which option should I use if I want to learn theories that will account for as much English sentence's structure as possible

Option 1: "Cambridge English Grammar Language" by Geoffrey Pullum or Option 2: a site which, i think, is based on government and binding theory: https://www.ling.upenn.edu/~beatrice/syntax-textbook/ ...
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0answers
96 views

Does pre-fortis clipping only operate within a syllable? If not, what is its actual scope?

English is known to have a phenomenon of "pre-fortis clipping": in certain contexts, vowel and sonorant phonemes before a fortis/voiceless consonant are realized with shorter duration than the same ...
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0answers
48 views

State of the art in controlled english languages?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Controlled_natural_language lists some controlled languages, of which Attempto Controlled English seems to be the most recent. However, are there any Attempto extensions, ...
3
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0answers
90 views

Usage of the implicit objective subordinate clause in English

I'm not a fluent english speaker. While speaking this language, we usually prefer the implicit objective subordinate clauses (with subject in the accusative case, if it exists) to the corresponding ...
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1answer
111 views

wo where, who wer, da there, the der [closed]

Are German wo and English who, German wer and English where, German da and English the, German der and English there from the same origin?
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1answer
56 views

wherewith, whereon [closed]

I have just noticed, that I may translate Russian accusative case, prepositional case etc. by English wherewith, whereon etc. I am thought about: 1. "Why is used "where" instead of "what" (whatwith, ...
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0answers
36 views

What aspects of a conceptual metaphor can be compared cross-culturally? [closed]

I'm interested to do a cross-cultural study of a conceptual metaphor 'Love is food' between English and Thai. I would like to compare the use of this metaphor in the two languages to find similarities ...
2
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1answer
81 views

Is _ing a derivational suffix in the noun “reading” (as in the event--e.g. a poetry reading)?

Clearly there is a difference between the gerund form of the verb "read" and the noun "reading." Is the word-formation process of the latter different in that its -ing suffix is derivational?
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31 views

big english word frequency list [duplicate]

I'm in need of English 100,000 frequency word list. I hope you tell me about a free option (if available) or an inexpensive one.
38
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2answers
8k views

Is English tonal for some words, like “permit”?

I have heard the difference between tone and intonation described in the following way: Tone is when the pitch of a word determines its meaning. Intonation is when the pitch of a word conveys its ...
2
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2answers
144 views

Is it possible to speak like a native speaker of English by mastering the phonology?

I know some professors of phonetics teach phonetics(in a country like India) in a laboratory almost similar to that of the native speakers.But when they come out of the class their pronunciation does ...
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1answer
74 views

Do linguistics academics adhere to arbitrary rules of English prescriptive grammar in their writing?

I'm specifically curious about passive voice and how it's often said to be a weak writing style. Since linguists ostensibly might view scorning passive voice as maybe a meaningless rule, would it be ...
28
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5answers
7k views

Is future tense in English really a myth?

Does English really have two tenses - present and past? Some linguists argue that it is a Latinate fallacy to think that English has three tenses. Some English professors and even some native ...
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0answers
59 views

Slip of the tongue

Just now, I had a slip of the tongue which resulted in a silly grammatical error. I said "if I had, I would not commented on it". I added "have" afterwards. My question is "do natives make such ...
0
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1answer
69 views

Define “own” with more primitive linguistic concepts?

I am trying to define the concept of ownership or "having" with basic more primitive concepts. My first try is: I own X == Only I can take X But does the word take imply taking ownership of? So ...
0
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2answers
87 views

Is “parent” a hyponym or a meronym of “parents”?

A hyponym is a word or phrase whose semantic field is included within that of another word. A meronym denotes a constituent part of, or a member of something It can be said that "parents" is ...
34
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4answers
6k views

Why isn't “I've” a proper response?

Suppose someone asked me the question, "Have you completed the project?". A standard response would be "I have". Why does the equivalent "I've" sound so strange and never used as a replacement? I am ...
20
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8answers
4k views

What are some interesting features that are common cross-linguistically but don't exist in English?

This is on purpose not a very concrete question, I simply want to know some interesting properties other languages have that English doesn't, or features you even think English ought to have, this can ...
3
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1answer
191 views

Why is the passive voice more prevalent in English than in other Indo-European languages?

Although the active voice is predominant in the English language the ‘ideal’ proportion of recommended passive sentences is still regarded as between 5% and 10%(source1) ( source2). Which is ...
5
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2answers
270 views

Why do “house” and “mouse” have “s” on the end?

I know, that English "t" and German "s" may be a cognate it -> es out -> aus what -> was that -> das? Why do "house" and "mouse" have "s" on the end?
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1answer
192 views

Gothic script for “b”, “v” and “p”

I know that the German verb "haben", the English verb "have" and Latin "capio" are cognate. I know that the German verb "Sieben", the English verb "seven" and Latin "septem" are cognate. I know that ...
2
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1answer
302 views

Can someone explain the English 'W' sound?

I have found out that the English letter 'W', as in the word "weep", is classified as a voiced labiovelar approximant. To quote Wikipedia: Its place of articulation is labialized velar, which means ...
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0answers
40 views

How are measure expressions in English analyzed?

English seems pretty flexible in allowing "measure expressions" to appear in positions modifying adjectives and determiners. What are these things actually called? How are they usually analyzed? 1) ...
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1answer
130 views

Where does the spelling <ea> as a short e sound (such as bread) come from? [closed]

Where does the spelling as the short e sound (such as bread) come from?
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42 views

English phonemes audio database

I need an audio file database with any audio format which will contain the 44 English phonemes spoken by different speakers.
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1answer
96 views

Is English unusual for using compound comparisons for describing unusual things? [closed]

English seems to create normal/not normal divisions. For instance: Paranormal Supernatural Extraterrestrial I'll call these compound comparisons. To me this seems to be very problematic in may ways. ...
0
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1answer
98 views

Why did Oftentimes not become standard English outside of the US

I had never heard anyone use "oftentimes" as a word until I watched an American in a youtube video about 5 years ago. I am confident that where I am in Australia and in the UK that it wouldn't be ...
4
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1answer
98 views

Where does Texan English derive its l-vocalization?

My English teacher grew up in Texas and unsurprisingly her native dialect is Texan English. I noticed that when intervocalic /l/ is followed by /i/, the /l/ is elided and /y/ takes its place. For ...
4
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2answers
238 views

Why did Canadian English remain so close to standard U.S English?

TV Stereotypes about exaggerated Canadian accents not withstanding, to me Canadian English sounds identical to standard U.S English. I can't tell English speaking Canadians from Americans with ...
2
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1answer
158 views

Diphthongisation in varieties of English

Consider the vowel in a word like "know". The way I pronounce it sounds maybe like /nøʉ/ to me. But other Brits oftentimes think I have a foreign accent, so I don't know about that. And I am sure I've ...