Questions tagged [english]

A Germanic language, which originated from England, and is considered the leading language in international communication.

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2
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1answer
68 views

/t/ sound is pronounced like [ts] in British English

My question is about the sound /t/ being pronounced more like [ts] in British accent. For example, The words like Tomato, Peter, water, task, Tom, talented, take the /t/ sound is definitely not ...
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1answer
85 views

Are Russian words пять (five), пясть (fist), пятка (heel) related? What about English “fist”?

I wonder whether the PIE word for five in fact meant "fist", in other words, when people counted, they closed their fingers and when they obtained the closed fist, it was "five"? ...
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The death of her grandmother did more than carry away the woman Alexandra loved best [closed]

The death of her grandmother did more than carry away the woman Alexandra loved best. link Throughout the twentieth century , bridal magazines have done more than just tell young women what to buy ...
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2answers
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Is modern English the most spoken language of all time?

Out of all of the people that have ever lived, did/do more of them speak modern English than any other language? There are 2 billion English speakers alive today, but in my brief search I wasn't able ...
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1answer
25 views

If discrepancies are to facts, then what _____ is to intuition? I can't think of the word [closed]

A discrepancy is a lack of compatibility or similarity between two or more facts, but what is a lack of compatibility or similarity between one's intuition and reality? Does there exist a word for ...
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54 views

Differences in realization of intrusive-r and linking-r?

Are there any good papers that have investigated this? I seemed to notice this with some speakers on television that their intrusive-r's seemed less pronounced than their linking-r's. I did find a ...
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33 views

Syntax trees drawing

I am having trouble drawing a syntax tree for a sentence and I would appreciate it if someone could help me. The sentences is : Every student in third grade should report to the principal's office in ...
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1answer
108 views

Is there a reason for language names only sometimes corresponding with the word for people who live there or people who speak that language?

Some language names are also the names of the people who speak that language, for example Russian, Norwegian, Italian, and German. But others are not, for example Dutch, French, English, and Spanish. ...
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55 views

What’s the name of this figure of speech?

Saying “The not tall boy” instead of “The short boy” does it have a name?
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45 views

Origin of English's phrasal possessive

This site claimed that the phrasal possessive in English came from French influence, while the synthetic possessive is Germanic. Germanic Pattern: the king’s son - cf. German "des Königs Sohn&...
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1answer
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Is the word “Language” in “Natural Language Processing” plural or singular, count or mass? [closed]

I want to translate the word language in the term NLP to the Arabic language. so I wonder, In Natural Language Processing, if the word language is countable or uncountable? whether it is plural or ...
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What word describes the unique possibilities when disambiguating a word?

The disambiguation page for the word turtle on wikipedia displays a list of possibilities to choose from. Many of these possibilities are just the same word turtle but with different meanings. ...
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2answers
247 views

/ðæs saɪd/ versus /ɡʊb bɔɪ/ - Assimilation of place versus manner

Good day I am facing a problem to distinguish between assimilation of place and assimilation of manner So in Peter R's book he said that (AOM) is much less noticeable, and he provided examples which ...
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Where can I find a table/list of all/many languages' plural/singular forms for hours/time?

Even though I'm natively Swedish, I'm seriously unsure if it's "1,1 timme" or "1,1 timmar". That is, what in English would be "1.1 hour" or "1.1 hours". Even as ...
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54 views

Correcting Italians ending English words with schwa

I am trying to find some exercises to help some Italian students (upper intermediate) learning English correct a common phonological error amongst Italian people speaking English where they stress the ...
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1answer
40 views

Deruny, deruni or deryni? [closed]

What is the correct spelling of potato pancakes, If we take the Russian or Ukrainian origin of the word? Deruny, deruni or deryni? A google search for the etymology says deryny And Wikipedia: Potato ...
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37 views

Adjunct vs complement with intransitive verb

Tony came from outside the traditional media Am I right in thinking because came is intransitive that "outside the traditional media" is an adjunct rather than a subject complement?
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73 views

Where did English get its perfect tense(s) from?

Apologies if this is too basic, but I know very little about linguistics and figured this would be a good place to ask. English seems like it draws from several other langiuages, notably the romance ...
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3answers
956 views

What is the name of this sound change, and do we have it in English?

I'm a Persian, I'm from Iran, and I speak Farsi. Here, we have a very strange rule that we turn آ into و in informal conversations. For example: خانه = house (formal) /kh a ne/ خونه = house (informal) ...
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Ambiguity in “Joe and David discussed his plans for tomorrow evening” [duplicate]

Is there a specific term for the ambiguity in the sentence, "Joe and David discussed his plans for tomorrow evening," the ambiguity arising from the use of "his" when it could ...
3
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1answer
94 views

Is English grammar teaching tradition rooted in Latin?

I heard once that the way English grammar was taught as school was rooted in Latin and it wasn't a correct approach for a number of reason ? This was a long time ago, so I cannot remember the details. ...
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85 views

Why do some abstract concepts get described as a liquid in English?

For example, work is completely abstract but we talk about workflows, which is something pertaining to fluids. Why does this happen?
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1answer
70 views

How to make a sonority curve for a word where a 'syllabic consonant' is followed by a vowel or vice versa

I've learnt that the number of peaks of sonority in a sonority curve determines the number of syllables in a word. The number of syllables depend on the pronunciation. It may also be true for other ...
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6answers
5k views

Is there any evidence to support the claim that English grammar is unusually straightforward?

The renowned linguist Eddie Izzard devoted at least one of his standup comedy routines to the proposition that English grammar is unusually straightforward, at least in comparison (if I recall ...
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1answer
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Einbilden vs. Imagine

One of the German words for Imagine is Einbilden, which I believe literally translates to "in-picture". This made me think of the fact that Imagine itself has the prefix Im-, which (together ...
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44 views

Expressions of internal vs external directionality in English, Latin or Greek

For physical placement "up vs down" meets this meaning in relation to the Earth (even though the intended meaning is relative to the top vs bottom of an observer's visual field) and "...
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1answer
163 views

Is there evidence of a disposition for certain races to learn certain languages? [closed]

For example would those of Chinese descent have a disposition to learn Chinese? Chinese is a quite different language being logographic then say English which is alphabetic. Another example would be ...
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99 views

Is “them” in “I care for them” an indirect object, a direct object, or neither sort? What exactly is the term “object” describing?

I’m try­ing to sort out verb com­ple­ments (broadly de­fined here as any phrase that de­ter­mines, com­pletes, or re­fines the mean­ing of a verb) and the re­la­tions they form with verbs: ob­ject re­...
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107 views

Why can “however” be used independently, when “but” cannot?

According to Purdue OWL, there are two kinds of words that can be used as connectors at the beginning of independent clauses: coordinating conjunctions (so, yet, but, and) and independent marker words ...
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49 views

Do the two meanings of “badass” belong to pragmatics or semantics?

As far as I know, pragmatics is about context-dependent meanings and semantics is about literal i.e. context-independent meanings. For example, https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/badass says: badass (...
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3answers
145 views

How to Romanize “شایق” in order to be easiest to an English speaker?

Question How to Romanize "شایق" in order to be easiest to an English speaker? Description I am Iranian; my last name is شایق (Persian). To get a passport, it is needed to submit your full ...
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0answers
92 views

Stress bearing suffixes in Optimality Theory

Stress bearing suffixes in English words like Chinese, Japanese, cigarette, fifteen violate the non-finality constraint. Can anyone explain what other constraints outrank non-finality and allows the ...
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1answer
174 views

When speaking a foreign language, why do people use the corresponding word of their native language for the word “so”?

I have noticed people using the word for "so" (in order to / therefore) in their language, rather than the language they are trying to speak. This happens with persons who are otherwise very ...
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62 views

Is rhymability of languages a quantifiable concept?

I know some languages besides English, and poetry in them rhymes much better than it does in English. It's subjective, I know, but I feel like poetry generally sacrifices clarity for rhyme, while in ...
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22 views

Is there a thesaurus for homonyms?

I was considering building some dnd puzzles based on homonyms (it took me awhile to discover the correct term). I was both surprised and not that there were already riddles/puzzles based on this theme,...
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0answers
110 views

Is there evidence that English speakers associate black with bad and/or white with good

Prompted by the recent move towards replacing the terms "blacklist" and "whitelist", I wonder if there is research around the topic of how people feel about the words "black&...
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1answer
104 views

“Go” and “Went” — how words expressing (to modern speakers) very related concepts sound so different?

Does the difference in sound of these two words in English imply that at one time to "go in the past" was not understood as being related to going in the present? Or that there was no way to ...
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1answer
71 views

Is by - near - related to bi - double?

Is by - near - related to bi - double? I tried going through wiktionary to find out, but to no avail. I can tell that 'bi-' is from latin, and there is no mention of 'by' being from latin. However, in ...
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2answers
180 views

Why do Chinese and Hindi have more terms for relatives than English does?

I was thinking about labels we assign family members (like cousin, grand mother etc.) and it struck me that in my native language of Hindi, we have different labels for maternal and paternal family ...
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1answer
385 views

Was it ever common to pronounce “wife's” as “wives”?

Spelling, in principle, should reflect pronunciation, but I've also read that the opposite can happen, and that the pronunciation of a word already in circulation can be changed by altering/...
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0answers
260 views

Are there any studies on some English passive verb constructions currently being replaced by new intransitive senses?

In the past couple of years I've noticed a new trend in younger generations of native English speakers, at least in American English and Australian English. But I can't find it discussed anywhere on ...
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4answers
3k views

Is there a term for translating a word to a language that has a different alphabet (such as Hindi to English)?

The specific example that I am thinking of is the word "दाल का सूप" in Hindi. It translates to "lentil soup", and is pronounced "dal", however there are multiple ways of ...
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1answer
124 views

Is there any case in English where a noun phrase is not the subject of a sentence, or a complement of a verb, or the object of a preposition?

It's a simple question but limited to how noun phrases function in English sentences. Time phrases like last week, are an example of noun phrases functioning adverbially but they are still verb ...
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1answer
152 views

Why did “s” use to look like “f”?

Example: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b6/Houghton_EC65.M6427P.1667aa_-_Paradise_Lost%2C_1667.jpg Paradife loft. There is no way that I can ever read that as: Paradise lost. The ...
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0answers
54 views

Measuring lexical similarity between two arbitrary languages

Pardon me if this question is naive, but I am wondering if there is a way to quantify lexical similarity between two corpora of text, each written in different languages whose alphabets differ greatly....
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1answer
83 views

Is there any rule in Old English / Modern English a/o, a/oa transformation?

Is there any rule in Old English / Modern English a/o (ham/home, ban/bone, stan/stone), a/oa (fam/foam, hlaf/loaf, gat/goat) transformation?
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2answers
103 views

Does the word Culture come from Tamil “கலாச்சாரம்”? [closed]

The Tamil word "Kalacharam" is very similar to the English "Culture". The "am" can be ignored as it is in many Tamil ideas, so Kalachar is very similar to Culture. Did ...
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6answers
5k views

Why can you say “I am not sure whether it's raining” but not “I am sure whether it's raining”? [closed]

I know that some verbs take interrogative clauses ("I know where they are") while others don't (* "I believe where they are"). The verb "sure" is kind of like "...
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1answer
53 views

Is English modeled as a deterministic CFL or a CFL?

Books on linguistics and NLP often mention that English is modeled by context free grammars, but also is parsed by LR(k) parsers. LR(k) parsers are for parsing deterministic CFLs, while CFLs are ...
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1answer
124 views

Differences between free languages and official languages?

In short: as far as I know, English in the USA has no official standards from the government for how it's to be written and used. There are just dictionaries. Spanish however, has the RAE, which is an ...

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