Questions tagged [english]

A Germanic language, which originated from England, and is considered the leading language in international communication.

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0answers
17 views

What aspects of a conceptual metaphor can be compared cross-culturally?

I'm interested to do a cross-cultural study of a conceptual metaphor 'Love is food' between English and Thai. I would like to compare the use of this metaphor in the two languages to find similarities ...
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What are some English romantic novels which have a lot of conceptual metaphors of love? [on hold]

I'm looking for a romantic novel with a lot of conceptual metaphors of love, for examples, LOVE IS A NUTRIENT: I am starved for love. LOVE IS A JOURNEY: It´s been a long, bumpy road. LOVE IS A UNITY ...
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Is English tonal for some words, like “permit”?

I have heard the difference between tone and intonation described in the following way: Tone is when the pitch of a word determines its meaning. Intonation is when the pitch of a word conveys its ...
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4answers
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What is the past tense of 'yeet'?

Yeet (/ji:t/) is a recently coined verb in English that seems to have taken on the characteristics of a strong verb, as seen in this hilarious urban dictionary definition. In English, the strong ...
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2answers
123 views

Is it possible to speak like a native speaker of English by mastering the phonology?

I know some professors of phonetics teach phonetics(in a country like India) in a laboratory almost similar to that of the native speakers.But when they come out of the class their pronunciation does ...
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31 views

big english word frequency list

I'm in need of English 100,000 frequency word list. I hope you tell me about a free option (if available) or an inexpensive one.
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2answers
284 views

Beginner to Dutch language: should I translate Dutch to English or to German?

I am a fluent English speaker (lvl C2) and a decent German speaker (lvl B2 and fully prepared for C1). I recently started following a Dutch course for beginners. My fear is that I will eventually ...
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42 views

Can anyone translate this please? Which language is it? [closed]

Œëřþżůīœæßđğłýç somebody told me it's secret massage for me and I think he removed the space between the words.
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How they got this Chinese translation? [migrated]

I am tinkering with learning Chinese and am messing around with the Tao Te Ching. The first sentence in Chinese is this: 道可道,非恆道; The way this is typically translated is this: The Dao that can ...
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5answers
7k views

Is future tense in English really a myth?

Does English really have two tenses - present and past? Some linguists argue that it is a Latinate fallacy to think that English has three tenses. Some English professors and even some native ...
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3answers
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English words which are both verbs and adjectives

A question about UI design led me to speculate about English words which are both a verb and an adjective. My answer to the question addresses this linguistics issue as the root of the UI issue. I ...
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1answer
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Do linguistics academics adhere to arbitrary rules of English prescriptive grammar in their writing?

I'm specifically curious about passive voice and how it's often said to be a weak writing style. Since linguists ostensibly might view scorning passive voice as maybe a meaningless rule, would it be ...
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Why does ISO 639-3 have many language codes for Arabic but only one for English?

ISO 639-3 has many language codes for Arabic, but only one for English. I'm an Arab who is familiar with multiple Arabic dialects. We do not call it anything but "لهجات" which is translated to "...
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1answer
270 views

Why is there no Subject-Auxilliary inversion in Subject questions?

In questions where a wh-element refers to the object, we can observe SAI (Subject-Auxilliary inversion). [Who did [you see]]? As far as I'm aware, C-head has a [+Q] feature and it's occupied by a ...
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57 views

Slip of the tongue

Just now, I had a slip of the tongue which resulted in a silly grammatical error. I said "if I had, I would not commented on it". I added "have" afterwards. My question is "do natives make such ...
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1answer
62 views

Define “own” with more primitive linguistic concepts?

I am trying to define the concept of ownership or "having" with basic more primitive concepts. My first try is: I own X == Only I can take X But does the word take imply taking ownership of? So ...
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4answers
6k views

Why isn't “I've” a proper response?

Suppose someone asked me the question, "Have you completed the project?". A standard response would be "I have". Why does the equivalent "I've" sound so strange and never used as a replacement? I am ...
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2answers
70 views

Is “parent” a hyponym or a meronym of “parents”?

A hyponym is a word or phrase whose semantic field is included within that of another word. A meronym denotes a constituent part of, or a member of something It can be said that "parents" is ...
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2answers
148 views

What triggers the presuppositions in these sentences?

I am working with these two sentences: Alex stopped playing the piano. What I concluded is that the sentence presupposes that Alex had previously played the piano. But why does the ...
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8answers
4k views

What are some interesting features that are common cross-linguistically but don't exist in English?

This is on purpose not a very concrete question, I simply want to know some interesting properties other languages have that English doesn't, or features you even think English ought to have, this can ...
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2answers
53k views

The Origin of the Word 'God'

I originally posted this a while ago on my blog, but someone recently suggested that I pose it as a question here. A brief Wikipedia search on the origin of the word ‘god’ reveals the following: ...
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1answer
170 views

Why is the passive voice more prevalent in English than in other Indo-European languages?

Although the active voice is predominant in the English language the ‘ideal’ proportion of recommended passive sentences is still regarded as between 5% and 10%(source1) ( source2). Which is ...
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7answers
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Do absolute synonyms exist?

By absolute synonyms, I mean words (in the same language) that are interchangeable in all situations. There can't be differences in register, meaning, or emotional value. Is there material that ...
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0answers
52 views

What explains the semantic sameness in 'Verb + preposition + Direct Object' and 'Verb + Direct Object'?

Why can prepositions following a verb not affect the meaning of Verb Phrases that differ by only a preposition? I.e., what explains the semantic sameness between Verb Phrases that differ by only a ...
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2answers
236 views

Why do “house” and “mouse” have “s” on the end?

I know, that English "t" and German "s" may be a cognate it -> es out -> aus what -> was that -> das? Why do "house" and "mouse" have "s" on the end?
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1answer
184 views

Phrase structure tree of a Wh question

The sentence would be "Whose dirty underwear is this?". I assume that the base (is that called deep structure sentence?) would be "This is whose dirty underwear" but I'm not sure what ...
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1answer
175 views

Gothic script for “b”, “v” and “p”

I know that the German verb "haben", the English verb "have" and Latin "capio" are cognate. I know that the German verb "Sieben", the English verb "seven" and Latin "septem" are cognate. I know that ...
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160 views

Why was 'thwart' assigned to PIE *terkw- “to twist”?

thwart (adv.) [...] c. 1200, from a Scandinavian source, probably Old Norse þvert "across," originally neuter of thverr (adj.) "transverse, across," (cognate with Old English þweorh "...
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1answer
245 views

Can someone explain the English 'W' sound?

I have found out that the English letter 'W', as in the word "weep", is classified as a voiced labiovelar approximant. To quote Wikipedia: Its place of articulation is labialized velar, which means ...
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1answer
138 views

The “th” sound as a plosive in British dialects

I've noticed that the th sound often becomes a plosive sound in Appalachian English. When and how did this phenomenon start?The only case I know where this happens in the british isles is Irish.Does ...
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2answers
11k views

dear, ear, fear, gear, hear, near … why are bear/pear pronounced differently?

In class last week we were looking at pronunciation ... and something caught me out. Why are some words spelt very similar to multiple others, yet pronounced so differently? Is it because of their ...
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39 views

How are measure expressions in English analyzed?

English seems pretty flexible in allowing "measure expressions" to appear in positions modifying adjectives and determiners. What are these things actually called? How are they usually analyzed? 1) ...
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1answer
105 views

Where does the spelling <ea> as a short e sound (such as bread) come from? [closed]

Where does the spelling as the short e sound (such as bread) come from?
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English phonemes audio database

I need an audio file database with any audio format which will contain the 44 English phonemes spoken by different speakers.
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1answer
88 views

Is English unusual for using compound comparisons for describing unusual things? [closed]

English seems to create normal/not normal divisions. For instance: Paranormal Supernatural Extraterrestrial I'll call these compound comparisons. To me this seems to be very problematic in may ways. ...
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4answers
906 views

Does English language stand special in terms of phonology?

I am a native Russian speaker. When I am listening to songs and music in other languages, which I do not know, such as Italian, Romanian, Greek, Bulgarian, and even Japanese, Finnish, Kyrgyz and ...
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1answer
96 views

Why did Oftentimes not become standard English outside of the US

I had never heard anyone use "oftentimes" as a word until I watched an American in a youtube video about 5 years ago. I am confident that where I am in Australia and in the UK that it wouldn't be ...
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1answer
690 views

Meta-operational grammar

On the bottom page 6 of this paper, the author starts describing Henri Adamczewski's meta-operational grammar theory. What the author says is complete Latin to me, a complete newbie. Can anyone of ...
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1answer
146 views

Etymology of impersonal pronoun “one”

The 'impersonal' pronoun in Germanic and Romance languages seems to come from one of two paths: Cognate with the word for 'man' Proto-Germanic: *mann- Dutch: men German: man Old English: man (< ...
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1answer
85 views

Subordination. Chinese vs English

Linguists claim that subordination is universal across the world languages. Subordination in English looks can be understood by looking into these examples: I know a person who has a dog I know a ...
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3answers
141 views

What's the term for the use of “this” in “there's this guy called John, who…”?

What's the term for the use of "this" in "there's this guy called John, who..."? Here, the "this" is used like an "a", not literally "this". I'm not sure if there's a term for this.
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1answer
128 views

DP acting as AdvP?

Is it possible for a DP like "three times" to act as an AdvP ("He read the book three times.")? How would such a constituency tree look like? How does the DP modify the verb? Conversely, would the ...
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2answers
308 views

The current status of Irish Gaelic in Ireland

In addition to all the usual phonology, grammar, and vocabulary one has to learn for a new language there is the social situation, among many things when is it appropriate to speak in one register or ...
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1answer
85 views

Where does Texan English derive its l-vocalization?

My English teacher grew up in Texas and unsurprisingly her native dialect is Texan English. I noticed that when intervocalic /l/ is followed by /i/, the /l/ is elided and /y/ takes its place. For ...
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2answers
232 views

Why did Canadian English remain so close to standard U.S English?

TV Stereotypes about exaggerated Canadian accents not withstanding, to me Canadian English sounds identical to standard U.S English. I can't tell English speaking Canadians from Americans with ...
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1answer
145 views

Diphthongisation in varieties of English

Consider the vowel in a word like "know". The way I pronounce it sounds maybe like /nøʉ/ to me. But other Brits oftentimes think I have a foreign accent, so I don't know about that. And I am sure I've ...
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Theory of Enunciative Operations and the present progressive

Please, take a look at this answer from English.SE. I have spent a lot of time trying to understand what the poster meant, but to no avail. His suggestion nicely deals with the cases of be, need and ...
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0answers
134 views

What happened to the number of english speakers in february 2018?

I recently noticed that English was in front of Mandarin in the Wikipedia list of languages by total number of speakers, so I wondered when it became first. I didn't find any convenient statistics on ...
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2answers
113 views

“I gave Tom an apple” and “I gave an apple to Tom”

"I gave Tom an apple" and "I gave an apple to Tom" have the same meaning. The meaning of Tom receiving the apple comes form the position of the word in the former example and from the preposition in ...
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4answers
185 views

Tomorrow, he should pretend he *was* on a bus

"He is afraid of flying. When he flies tomorrow, he should pretend he was on a bus instead of an airplane." I uttered the above statement in a recent conversation. Of course, I could replace the "...