Questions tagged [etymology]

The study of the history of words including their origins and the changes they've undergone through time.

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0answers
33 views

Understanding the etymology of Persian “farāmoş”, to forget

I'm having a hard time understanding the etymology of the Persian verb farâmuš kardan, meaning to forget in Persian. The infnitive kardan is often used to make verbs from nouns and adjectives, so for ...
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1answer
86 views

How did the cross-linguistic univerbation 'nothing/not/none/no + less' semantically shift to signify 'despite'?

Several European languages have (false?) cognate adverbs with the meaning of 'nevertheless' (and 'nonetheless') built from words meaning "nothing/not/none/no" and "less". despite something that ...
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1answer
52 views

Etymology of the word “šowhar” in Persian

I am looking for etymology of the word شوهر in Persian language, I looked in wiktionary and two other dictionaries but found nothing. šowhar means "husband" in modern persian. https://en.wiktionary....
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1answer
63 views

What is a good etymological dictionary for the Persian language?

There are dozens of etymological dictionaries for Persian, has somebody compared them, and if yes could you recommend me a good one?
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1answer
73 views

Was there a Proto-Germannic root of “miskunn”

I was not able to find an etymology of ON "miskunn" within PrG. Is the first syllable a prefix "mis-" indicating any "wrong kunn, lack of kunn" or a deformed "midi-" as in E "com-passion", G "Mit-leid"...
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3answers
160 views

Common root 'to gather' and 'together'

I just saw this insightful and touching video by John Green where he makes the connection between 'to gather' and 'together'. One could say "let's gather at the bus stop" for instance, causing the ...
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1answer
71 views

How did 'sitting' semantically shift to mean 'properness'?

What semantic notions underlie 'sit' and 'properness'? The following words for propriety hail from the Proto-Indo-European *sed- like Spanish & Portugese sentar French seoir English 'sit well' ...
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1answer
87 views

What semantic notions underlie PIE *meh₂d- ('wet') and Proto-Germanic *matōną, *matjaną (“to feed, eat”)?

I was reading the etymology of amadouer when I lighted on these attested morphemes: Etymology From Middle French amadouer (“to coax, lure”), from a- + *madouer (“to lure, give food to”), from ...
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3answers
273 views

Is the Malay “garam” (salt) related to the Latin “garum” (fish sauce)?

The Malay/Indonesian word for salt garam is surprisingly similar to the Latin word for the Roman fish sauce garum. Since garum was made from fermented salted fish, is there an etymological ...
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1answer
139 views

Are English 'gay' and Norwegian 'gøy' cognates?

Norwegian gøy means "fun" in both Bokmål and Nynorsk. Does this word have anything to do with English gay? Wiktionary says gay comes ultimately from Proto-Germanic ganhuz "sudden" via Old French gai ...
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1answer
55 views

The Methatesis in “scope” vs “to show”

I would like to hear some ideas that can explain Greek *σκέπτομαι, σκοπός "watcher, look-out, spy, mark, goal" from Proto-Indo-European *skep-ye-, from a metathesis of *speḱ-. Cognate to ...
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3answers
140 views

Why is the word “idiot” so similar between multiple languages?

Weird question, granted, but I was just looking around on Google Translate and I noticed that the word "idiot" is basically the same across quite a few languages, here are a few examples: Italian: ...
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3answers
208 views

good references for old indo-European languages

what enjoy the most is to trace back the words right to their origin. i had little study on Mazandarani(tabari\tapuri) dialect spoken is Mazandaran province of Iran. traced back some words to their ...
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1answer
52 views

Finding roots and cognates online

I'm studying linguistics and I want to know if there's an option for having several translations at once? For example, I enter "word" as an English entry and I get the below output: German: word1 ...
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3answers
150 views

Is there a specific linguistic term for the following practice of constructing new words/characters?

I have in mind examples such as the Scheingallizismus (lit. appearance of Gallicism) in German which are words/phrases constructed from French origins but are themselves unknown in French speaking ...
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1answer
652 views

What is the name of this Middle English letter?

The meaning of the depicted letter, in my opinion, is "and", but what is its (page 61) Mk.1:15 name?
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0answers
75 views

Relation between keltoi and galatai?

The ancient Greeks used both words and appeared to have originated both. The first form appears first in 517BC by Hecateus of Milietus. The word is still known in the 12th century AD where it's used ...
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2answers
313 views

from ekwos to ippo : transition from kw to p in greek

I can't understand how the transition from kappa-digamma to pi-pi happened in the transition from ekwos (same etymology as latin equus) to ippo. I mean how did the prononciation change ? Because is ...
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1answer
68 views

Etymological connection between “uncus” and “unguis”

The Latin words uncus (hook) and unguis (claw, fingernail) appear very phonologically similar to me, and semantically I can see why 'hook' and 'claw' could derive from the same source. However, ...
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1answer
377 views

Relations between 'knee' and 'generation'

Recently, a question was asked about the possibility of the words knee and generation being cognates. Unfortunately, that question is rather unclear, so I'm asking this as a separate post. The words ...
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2answers
130 views

Are the English word knee and the word generation cognate? [closed]

Are the English word knee and the English word generation cognate because of the Latin word genu "knee" in the Genetive case has the form genus and this is the case birth (the generation of the new ...
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1answer
97 views

Are the German words wer/was “who/what” derived from the q. word wo “where” + pns. er/es “he/it” by analogy with the Old Slavonic koi/chto “who/what”?

Are the German words wer "who" / was "what" derived from the question word wo "where" + pronouns er "he" / es "it": by analogy with the Old Slavonic [which could inherited this thing (feature) from ...
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1answer
87 views

Are the Latin word “octo” is derived from the serial number of the letter “h” in the alpabet? [closed]

Are the Latin word "octo" is derived from the serial number of the letter "h" in the alpabet? The latin words "veho" and "traho" transform into the latin words "vecto" and "tracto" respectively by ...
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1answer
82 views

Are Old Slavonic verb рещи (reshchi) “to say, to command” cognates with PIE: [h₃reǵ]?

Can anybody please explain to me why the Old Slavonic verb рещи (reshchi) "to say, to command" does not reflect PIE: h₃reǵ (related Terms: нарещи (nareshchi), изрещи (izreshchi), пророк (prorok), ...
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2answers
52 views

What natural symbolic representations could be used for Mathematical constants?

We know mathematics is a language by itself. But to evoke any constants or any arbitrary values as such to solve anything, prior knowledge of a particular symbol and its usage must be understood. ...
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1answer
74 views

Why do we write read for both present and past tense, but we pronounce them differently? [duplicate]

read verb \ ˈrēd \ read\ ˈred \ The words have the same spelling, but they are pronounced differently, and one of the words is pronounced exactly the same as a color’s name, “red,” yet its ...
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4answers
138 views

Is there a link between the words red and bread?

While this might sound random at first, I noticed that it works in multiple languages: Danish: brød (bread) = b + rød German: Brot = b + rot English: bread (spoken language) = b + red Is this a ...
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1answer
49 views

Research in psychiatry

My research is not linguistics pers se, it is placed in psychiatry, and my problem and question is the French etymology concerning the word psychiatry in French
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1answer
116 views

Where did Irish “-acht” come from?

Modern Irish has a suffix -acht (allomorphs -ocht, -eacht, -cht, probably others) that forms abstract nouns. For example, beo "alive" → beocht "life, vital spirit". Since we also see Scottish Gaelic -...
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1answer
70 views

Do reborrowings and neologisms statistically help the communicative function of the languages or do the cause more confusion?

Rephrasing do reborrowings and neologisms help or bedim the communications? I am making the distinction of instantaneous or contemporary communications(especialy for scientific use and social) and ...
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1answer
99 views

Etymology of Romanian “amor” (cf. “iubire”)

I found it interesting to learn that Romanian borrowed this word from a Slavic language as well as the verb "a iubi". I also discovered that the word "amor" is present in Romanian but apparently it ...
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2answers
131 views

what makes the link between the right/left hands,north/south directions and the duality good-bad

Background : I used to think that employing the word "right" to speak about good thinks was only an arabic culture trait - for instance the Quran describes good people with the expression "people of ...
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1answer
142 views

Etymology of impersonal pronoun “one”

The 'impersonal' pronoun in Germanic and Romance languages seems to come from one of two paths: Cognate with the word for 'man' Proto-Germanic: *mann- Dutch: men German: man Old English: man (< ...
3
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2answers
142 views

Are there other languages, besides Old Slavonic, with adjectives ending with pronoun?

Are there other languages, besides Old Slavonic, with adjectives ending with pronoun, e.g. добрый /dobryj/ he who is good; доброе /dobrojo/ it which is good; добрую /dobruju/ she who is good; добрыя /...
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1answer
68 views

The Proto-Germanic vowel “e” changes to the English “i”

What is the name of a sound shift law under which the Proto-Germanic vowel "e" changes to the English "i", e.g. *fehtaną (fechten) -> fight; *rehtaz (recht) -> right
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1answer
107 views

What is 'OE Gloss.'?

I'm not a linguistics student, so my bad if this is actually very obvious/can be found online (I tried. Really.), but what is, exactly, the OE Gloss.? All I could find is that it means Old English ...
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1answer
59 views

Are the Old Slavonic noun “дщерь” /dshcher' ''/ (En. daughter) and the English noun “daughter” to be related in any way? [closed]

Are the Old Slavonic noun “дщерь” /dshcher' ''/ (En. daughter) and the English noun “daughter” to be related in any way?
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1answer
96 views

Are the Russian noun “пламя” /plamya'/ (En. flame) and the German noun “Flamme” to be related? [closed]

Are the Russian noun “пламя” /plamya'/ (En. flame) and the German noun “Flamme” to be related by analogy with “пихта” /pikhta/ (En. fir-tree) -> Fichte
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2answers
87 views

Are the Russian noun “мрак” /mrak'/ (En. darkness) and the English noun “mirk” to be related in any way? [closed]

Are the Russian noun “мрак” /mrak'/ (En. darkness) and the English noun “mirk” to be related in any way?
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4answers
101 views

Words which originate in superstition/myth [closed]

I'm interested in words, from any language, whose etymological origin 'exposes' superstitious or scientifically obsolete beliefs. For example, the English disaster comes from Latin dis- + astro, ...
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1answer
103 views

What's the reason behind the aternation of vowel in the Proto-Germanic suffix “-ungō”/“-ingō”?

I noticed that the form with the u vowel was kept only in High German. All other germanic languages use the form with i,such as Dutch and English. Why is that?Is this the result of some sort of sound ...
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2answers
126 views

How “üçün” is Turkic but “çün” is Iranic?

Azerbaijani: çün Persian: çun Means: because Origin: Persian Azerbaijani: üçün üç+ün old-Turkic: uçun Means: because of Origin: old-Turkic So, can somebody explain how this is possible? More ...
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1answer
96 views

Turkic etymology dictionary

Is there a new Turkic etymology dictionary? I don't want something like Nişanyan which all Turkic words are Sogdian or Persian origin. I want something that analyses the words using true rules not ...
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0answers
60 views

What term predated “even” when referring to numbers? [closed]

In doing some poking around in etymologies, I noticed that while "odd" in the sense of "odd number" is attested as early as c.1300 (and is in fact the original sense of the term), "even" in the sense ...
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2answers
100 views

Are Old Slavonic “шкурка” and “корица” related to Italian “scorza”?

Could Old Slavonic nouns “шкурка” (shkurka) and “корица”(koritsa) be derived from Italian “scorza”(En. peel)? I have already looked them up in M. Vasmer's "Etymological dictionary of Russian language"...
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1answer
66 views

Could speakings “Старый Свет”, “Новый Свет” and “Конец Света” have common historical origin? [closed]

Could speakings "Старый Свет"(En. Old World), "Новый Свет"(En. New World) and "Конец Света"(En. end of the world) have common historical origin? based on the fact that: the Americas (New World) was ...
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1answer
79 views

Parabens vs. parabéns [closed]

Is there an etymological link between the word parabens in English (ex. Soap without parabens) and parabéns (congratulations) in Portuguese?
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2answers
150 views

Is Old Slavonic “тесто” related to Latin “tiesta”? [closed]

Could the Old Slavonic noun тесто (t'esto) 'dough' be derived from Latin tiesta 'baked clay', (Sp. tiesto)? Notice: spelling of the words and their similar meanings hinted me that they may be related....
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1answer
196 views

Are the Old Slavonic interrogative particle “еда” and verb “быти” to be related in any way?

Are the Old Slavonic interrogative particle "еда (ʲeda)" and verb "быти (byti)" to be related in any way? For example, on the basis of: existence the following present forms of the verb: есмь (ʲesm'...
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111 views

What is the etymology of “Tarim” as in “Tarim Basin” and does it relate to Tocharian?

I was trying to obtain a proper etymology for the name "Tarim" and found it rather difficult. The Wiktionary page only lists the modern Turkish word tarım meaning agriculture, so was the Wikipedia ...