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Questions tagged [fricatives]

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1answer
33 views

Dental and labiodental fricatives with different relative positions of the articulators

Are there distinct phonemes for labiodental fricatives articulated with the upper teeth touching the lower lip from the inside (like in English /f/) and ones that are articulated with the tip of the ...
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0answers
102 views

Reviewing the evidence of the spirantization of β (betacism) in Greek

Although I understand that it is impossible to assign a specific time to any sound change in Greek, I am curious about the spirantization of voiced stops, particularly of beta. I'll present the ...
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2answers
217 views

What does the tongue do to discriminate sibilant vs. non-sibilant?

My native language is Korean. And including me, probably most Korean people often confuse /θ/ with /s/, and /ð/ with /d/. The problem is, I don't know enough how sibilant fricatives and non-sibilant ...
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1answer
103 views

Voiced fricatives are just breathy approximants?

When I pronounce [v] and [ʋ], [v] sounds just like [ʋ̤]. This led me to analyze them via spectrum. So I recorded [f], [v] and [ʋ] with my smartphone, moved them to my computer, normalized them with ...
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4answers
731 views

Anglicisation of the voiceless velar fricative [x]

The voiceless velar fricative [x] is present in the English word yech, and sometimes loch, but is often enunciated as [h] or [k] when English speakers pronounce calques or foreign names. Is [h] or [k]...
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1answer
378 views

When does the voiceless velar fricative, [x], undergo voicing?

The voiceless velar fricative, [x], appears as ⟨ch⟩ in Polish. Apparently, [x] undergoes voicing and becomes [ɣ] under certain circumstances: Voiceless obstruents are voiced (/x/ becoming [ɣ], etc.)...
2
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1answer
150 views

Can the voiceless velar fricative, [x], be represented in Japanese?

I was specifically thinking of whether the voiceless velar fricative [x] as in Polish could be represented in Japanese, but [x] would be the same or very similar in every language which contains it, ...
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3answers
260 views

What is the nature of the voiceless velar fricative, [x], in Polish?

My surname is Cuch. Though I don't know much about Polish, I assume that this derives from the Polish word for chain, łańcuch. I pronounce my name as I've been briefly told by relatives: /tsux/ in the ...
8
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2answers
342 views

Any Spanish speech variety where F is pronounced as ϕ?

Are there any living speech varieties of Spanish (geographic, socio-economic) that pronounce the phoneme associated with the letter 'f' as [ϕ], as bilabial rather than labiodental? Just wondering ...
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1answer
208 views

Australian Aboriginal Languages: Fricatives

Can anyone give me any information at all on the distribution of fricatives (or the lack thereof) in Australian aboriginal languages, nearby languages, and worldwide? Additionally, any further or ...
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4answers
572 views

Are there languages in which two or all three of /χ/, /x/, and /ç/ are opposed as distinct phonemes?

These (and some others) are all quite similar raspy sounds to most ears and by features other than place of articulation: [χ] unvoiced uvular fricative [x] unvoiced velar fricative [ç] unvoiced ...