Questions tagged [greek]

A Hellenic language principally spoken in Greece.

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Ancient Greek sophós, Meaning of [migrated]

Before I ask the question, may I politely ask people not to lecture me about me being an idiot. I know I am. So I am not asking for what is available in any dictionary. I am not asking what is the ...
Attila the Pun's user avatar
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How did οι merge with υ and υι in Koine?

Before the merger of ι and υ, there was a previous merger between υ, υι, and οι. υι makes sense as it was the long equivalent of υ. I’m still unsure how οι came to be pronounced as /y/.
Quinali Solaji's user avatar
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Eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age Sprachbund

I would like to know whether there is any research on the interactions between Bronze Age languages of the Near and Middle East like Greek, Hebrew, Aramaic, Phoenician, Persian and Hittite, in a way ...
Quaestor's user avatar
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1 answer
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When were the Greek names for these countries first used?

I'm analyzing this Greek prophecy which is contested to be from 1053 or 1753. I've seen claims that it uses Greek words anachronistic to 1053: Now over the years I began to doubt if the dating of the ...
c0d3rman's user avatar
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When discussing age in Greek, is use of the aorist tense more indicative of when one turned a certain age rather than them just simply being that age? [migrated]

The Greek text for Luke 2:42 reads: Καὶ ὅτε ἐγένετο ἐτῶν δώδεκα, ἀναβαινόντων αὐτῶν κατὰ τὸ ἔθος τῆς ἑορτῆς The English translation (KJV) of Luke 2:42 reads: And when he was twelve years old, they ...
warriorfortruth's user avatar
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Did Cretan Greek have [s] as an allophone of /ts/ after a nasal?

Wikipedia cites Hinge (2001) as reporting the claim that Cretan Greek had [s] as an allophone of /ts/ after a nasal. I’m not a German speaker so I can’t verify this. The relevant section from the ...
Quinali Solaji's user avatar
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Difference between ancient greek stative aspect and latin perfective aspect

In greek the perfect, pluperfect and future perfect are a combination of tense (present, past and future) and the stative aspect while the perfective aspect is used in combination with the past tense ...
Faith mp's user avatar
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1 answer
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How did the pronunciation of zeta vary by dialects in Ancient Greek?

From what I understand, zeta was pronounced as /zd/ in Attic during the 5th century BC arising from a previous /dz/. Was this metathesis unique to 5th c. BC Attic or was it innovated by other dialects ...
Quinali Solaji's user avatar
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What is the origin of alpha in the mediopassive indicative?

In greek, the indicative mediopassive in the 3rd person singular and plural are -εται and -ονται, however in PIE, the alpha was originally an o. Additionally, in the imperfect, the endings also have o ...
Blubber's user avatar
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Source of Greek long alpha

I'm reading about the Greek first declension on wikipedia, which mentions that the origin of the first declension originally had long alpha, which then shifted to eta, except when after rho, iota, and ...
Blubber's user avatar
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Why isn't there a letter for /b/ sound in Greek alphabet while they have the sound?

In Greek the letter B sounds /v/; for example we have Vanadium which is Βανάδιο in Greek which in turn is transliterated as Vanάdio in English. But what about when we have a /b/ sound? For example, we ...
Snack Exchange's user avatar
18 votes
1 answer
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Why did the consonant clusters /ks/ and /ps/ merit their own designated letters in Ancient Greek?

Ancient Greek had many consonant clusters, like /pn/ in pneuma, /bd/ in bdellion, and /pt/ in pteron. But for some reason, /ks/ (ξ) and /ps/ (ψ) received special real estate in the 24-letter Greek ...
Fomalhaut's user avatar
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Do the "gibberish lines" in the Charition farce reflect a Dravidian language?

The Charition farce (P.Oxy. III, 413) is a Greek theatre play which tells the story of a girl, Χαριτίων Charitíōn, who is held captive in a coastal kingdom of India. The only manuscript of this ...
Tochtli's user avatar
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Is it reasonable to connect the Old Persian/Avestan word for "garden" with the Greek word?

The Old Persian/Avestan word for "garden/orchard" is bustan/bostan. On the surface, this word looks very similar to the Greek term botane, which means the same thing (and is clearly the ...
Reb Chaim HaQoton's user avatar
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1 answer
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Why does πεντάμορφη mean "beautiful"? [closed]

How does "five-formed / five-shaped", πεντάμορφη, mean "beautiful"? Such that it's used as in translation of "Beauty and the Beast" movie titles, and accepted by Google ...
Malady's user avatar
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Is < eu > an element in Greek?

I am pondering the morphological structure of < therapeutic > and < pharmaceutical >. When looking at the Greek roots I can analyze the spelling with the exception of < eu >. I see ...
Shawna Pope-Jefferson's user avatar
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Does this way of organizing Greek consonants make sense?

I heard from a Greek learner who shared their way of organizing the Greek consonants in the following: unvoiced less unvoiced voiced less voiced kappa chi ...
Tim's user avatar
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2 answers
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How to understand the differences and similarities between the orders in Greek and Latin alphabets, for memorizing?

Letters in Greek alphabet are ordered similarly to those in Latin, but not exactly the same. Is there any reason for the differences? I ask the question for finding a way to understand and therefore ...
Tim's user avatar
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Is eta in Ancient Greek transliterated as long e or h?

Is eta in Ancient Greek transliterated as long e (e.g. https://pressbooks.bccampus.ca/greeklatinroots2/chapter/%c2%a798-the-greek-alphabet/), or h (e.g. https://www.dictionary.com/e/greek-alphabet-...
Tim's user avatar
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Why are there so few Hellenic languages when there are so many Romance languages? [duplicate]

Both Greece and Rome had huge empires and Greek was even used to administer the Eastern Roman Empire. Christian scriptures are even primarily written in Greek. So why are there so many Romance ...
King-Ink's user avatar
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Greek root in Latin: Greek ekleiptikos became Latin eclīpticus

How come it's lip and not leip? The English word eclipsis is derived from the Latin eclīpticus, of an eclipse, which is in turn from Greek ekleiptikos, from ekleipein, to fail to appear; Ancient Greek ...
Quora Feans's user avatar
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Is there any evidence for PIE *deikW- ‘feast’ to Greek deîp-?

The interpretation of Linear B de-qo-no as ‘main dinner’ and po-ro-de-qo-no as ‘pre-dinner’ would only work if PIE *deikW- ‘feast’ > deîpnon. However, it is cognate with words with -p-: *deip- >...
Sean Whalen's user avatar
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Are there any common Hebrew or Koine Greek markers for when a sentence is a summary of a previous thought?

Question pertains to the Hebrew Scriptures, and the Septuagint, so it may be more appropriate in a different SE. But, in case this is an acceptable place to ask: Are there any ancient Hebrew or Koine ...
Sam Thornton's user avatar
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1 answer
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How did Shiloah (שילוח) become Siloam and Silwan?

What sorts of changes led the Biblical Hebrew name Shiloah (שילוח) to become Siloam (in Greek) and Silwan (in Arabic)? Has this been discussed anywhere? EDITED I removed the word morphological from my ...
Reb Chaim HaQoton's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
195 views

Credible sources for Rho-Rotation?

A teacher of mine recently mentioned a phenomenon in linguistics called "rho-rotation". Across eons and languages if a r/rho sound was next to a vowel it tended to switch postitions and &...
SoccerFan's user avatar
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Can I find an Ancient Greek parsing program that dissects words into their constituent phonemes from reconstructed Proto-Greek?

For example, suppose I enter "πράσσουσα" and it outputs πραάͳοντσα or even, πρααͳ-ο-ντ-σα (root, ablaut, participle marker, feminine). Or I put in πᾶς and it outputs πάαντ-ς (root, 3rdNS)...
Oron61's user avatar
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Could lat. circus 'circle' (< gr. κίρκος) and κύκλος 'cycle' be related?

It is well established that the Latin word circus 'circle' is a loanword from Greek κίρκος kírkos 'circle, ring'. But it seems that κίρκος is of uncertain origin. One possibility is that κίρκος would ...
Davius's user avatar
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1 answer
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Origin of بطريق

I read here that the Arabic word بطريق (penguin) ultimately derives from Latin patricius (patrician), through Greek and Aramaic, but I couldn't find any explanation of how and why the shift in meaning ...
UndefinedBehavior's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
81 views

Why do Proto-germanic "-as" nouns have e-grade?

Why do Proto-germanic "-as" nouns have e-grade (don't have an ablaut like Ancient Greek τρέπ-ω τρόπ-ος, πέκ-ω πόκ-ος, λέχ-ομαι λόχ-ος, φέβ-ομαι φόβ-ος)?
Кузнецов Анатолий's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
166 views

Ioticism in Greek

Are there any good theories about what motivated the pervasive ioticism that developed between ancient Greek and modern Greek? Are there any other languages that went through analogous changes? The ...
Vegawatcher's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
461 views

Phonological Development from PIE to Greek

I found the following phonological development (from PIE to Greek) patterns very interesting. *kw>t / __ {e, i} (e.g., *penkwe- > πέντε) *gw>d / __ e (*gwelbhu- > δελψύς) *gwh>th / ...
Chickly's user avatar
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1 answer
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Why do Ancient Greek words have "εί" from PIE "e"?

Why do Ancient Greek words have "εί" from PIE "e"? Ancient Greek κείρω <- PIE *(s)ker-.
Кузнецов Анатолий's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
807 views

Where did the Greek consonant cluster "ps" come from

Where did the Greek consonant cluster "ps" come from? I tried finding resources to track down this fun-sounding consonant cluster but came with no information. I was thinking about a voicing ...
Jasperrolla's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
1k views

Beta vs eszett character difference

How to write the Greek letter beta and the German letter eszett so that they look different enough? I've seen variants of beta with the final arc ending on the vertical line and ones which have a ...
ByteEater's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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Does modern greek really nasalise intervowel γγ?

During my previous studies I was introduced to ancient Greek and, among other things, I learned that we believe double gamma γγ was pronounced like a prenasalised gamma, something like "ng", ...
Albert's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
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Linear A morphology

Linear A's lexicon is undeciphered, but I assume we know some things about it's morphology and phonology. I've only found this theory that the language of Linear A had a lot of prefixes. Where can I ...
Roses's user avatar
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13 votes
2 answers
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How did Greek loanwords with 'ae' come to be pronounced [i] in modern English?

There are a bunch of Greek loanwords in English that orthographically include the vowel sequence 'ae'. Examples include: aegis aether aeon The 'ae' vowel here is pronounced [i] in English, but at ...
A_S00's user avatar
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1 answer
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Does the root word mus- in Latin mean "thief"'? Mouse=thief, Moses=Extractor etc

I first got the idea of Latin mus- = mouse = thief from this list My primary question here is whether someone can confirm this, because I have not found any direct words in Latin that indicates that ...
Mr. Mouse's user avatar
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1 answer
295 views

What is the difference in usage of the word "root" in PIE and its daughter languages?

Now I understand that the conceptions of "root" in PIE and its descendant languages don't fully overlap. However what is the exact difference between them? What confuses me is the ...
Коля's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
90 views

What is the name of Germanic n > m near f / Greek ν > μ near π transformation?

What is the name of Germanic n > m near f / Greek ν > μ near π transformation?
fedor's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
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Pronunciation of P in Latin, versus Ph in Greek

In Latin, it seems some sounds that are pronounced like an "F" in Greek, are pronounced like a "P", why is this? For example, we have the Greek word Phoenicians, and this word ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
-5 votes
2 answers
235 views

Is the Greek ζ related to the Chinese 子?

I wonder whether there is any connections between the two letters. After all, they are both similar to the Phoenician Sade letter, and the Phoenicians were the dominant culture of the Mediterranean ...
AlgebraicsAnonymous's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
164 views

Can Greek form other compound words like "Hyperborea"?

In Greek mythology, the Hyperboreans were a race of giants that lived in a sort of paradise, where the sun shone constantly and everyone was perfectly happy. The land was supposedly located so far to ...
Curious's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
310 views

(Ancient Greek) Dogs and Emptiness, κύων and κενόω, related?

I've been curious about the concepts of emptiness and dogs. I have independently been exploring these and there seem to be some theological/philosophical convergence between Joshua and Caleb from the ...
Gus L.'s user avatar
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1 answer
106 views

Did the Greek term 'κεραία' derive from the Ivri term 'Kera' ( כְרָעַ֨ )? [closed]

Did the Greek term 'κεραία' (keraia) derive from the Ivri term 'Kera' ( כְרָעַ֨ )?
חִידָה's user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
4k views

Did Eureka lose its H?

Archimedes famously proclaimed Eureka, I have found it, but should the word itself proclaim I have lost my H? According to wiktionary and wikipedia, Eureka simply comes from the greek εὕρηκα, perfect ...
Matifou's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
193 views

Why did Χ and Ψ have such different sounds in early Eastern and Western Greek?

Why did Χ and Ψ have such different sounds in early Eastern and Western Greek? Which sounds are older? If the Western, why were both Ξ and Χ created to denote [ks] (note that they both appear in the ...
user17584's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
243 views

What is the position of the subject in a Greek sentence, whose word order is VSO?

The following is a Greek sentence Σε ποιόν φίλο νομίζεις ότι μιλάει ο άντρας; To which friend think.2SG that speak.3SG the man Its counterpart in ...
V.Lydia's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
72 views

Some idea of PIE in the ancient world? [duplicate]

Did the ancient Greeks and Romans have the idea (at least partly) similar to the concept the Proto-Indoeuropean language? Many among the elite spoke Greek fluently or at least learnt it intensively. ...
Max Li's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
266 views

Are the Paris's names "City of Light" and "Lutetia" connected?

Paris is called City of Light. I wonder whether this name could come from ancient name of the city Λευκοτεκία (Ptolemy). Λευκος in Greek means light or white. And τεκ- root means "stone" (cognates ...
Anixx's user avatar
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