Questions tagged [idiomaticity]

Use of segmentally complex expressions whose semantic structure is not deducible jointly from their syntactic structure and the semantic structure of their components. -- Weinreich (1972:89)

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1 vote
0 answers
74 views

Any languages beside English where one goes"back and forth" rather than "forth and back"?

Are there languages beside English in which one goes "back and forth" rather than, as is logical, "forth and back"? One typically goes "forth and back" or similarly in ...
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

Are there practical rules for distinguishing between literal and nonliteral expressions?

I'm very much a layperson with respect to linguistics, but I do enjoy reading religious texts (Bible, Hadith, etc.) and talking with adherents about their particular meanings. A question which seems ...
2 votes
0 answers
47 views

Do we have any evidence or research on the linguistic evolution of idioms?

Do we have any evidence or research on the linguistic evolution of idioms? For example, if two languages in the same language family have idioms with a similar meaning, is it likely that such an ...
  • 363
3 votes
0 answers
80 views

How is "In we go" syntactically valid?

Various simple sentences occur in English that I can't explain precisely. "In we went!" "Off he goes!" Is this an arcane idiom from an earlier grammar, or is there a general rule that can be ...
  • 131
2 votes
0 answers
39 views

what theories of idioms cover depth of idiomaticity?

It is obvious that, in English, the phrasal verb "get up" (meaning to awake and move out of bed) and the idiom "raining cats and dogs" (meaning rain strongly) have different depths of idiomaticity. ...
  • 61
2 votes
0 answers
115 views

Is there such a thing as "idiomatic density"?

I have heard about lexical density, but is there such a thing as "idiomatic density", and if so, does it have an established name? "Idiomatic density" would measure the effectiveness by which a ...
  • 121
2 votes
1 answer
124 views

Origin of “hold from” as an idiom meaning “love, like, respect” in European languages

Several European languages known to me have a verbal phrase idiom literally translatable as "hold from", expressing various kinds of positive attitude: Dutch houden van "love" Finnish pitää -stA "...
  • 10.6k
4 votes
0 answers
57 views

Term for universally-used quote with additional, non-compositional meaning

There exist certain fixed expressions which people use to convey quite specific meanings and (at least to me) always invoke a famous saying which is assumed to be common knowledge, such as I am not a ...
0 votes
1 answer
107 views

Name of the act of borrowing linguistic concepts from different languages

What is the term for concepts that got translated from one language or another? I've heard this term in a conversation about Czech Anglicisms such like: "Mějte hezký den." - the literal version of ...
  • 591
1 vote
2 answers
241 views

The Correct Research Methodology To Substantiate If an Expression is an Idiom?

Related: - Does linguistics have a concept of "set phrase" with a meaning differing from "idiom"? - In the Gospels, Can “Day of:” the Passover - be Interpreted Idiomatically? 1. ...
4 votes
1 answer
60 views

Within various languages, how often are colours used to signify a condition or a feeling?

I've seen in the English language that colors are used to signify what a person feels or a condition that person exists in (i.e. 'blue' referring to sadness and 'red' referring to anger.) I also know ...
0 votes
1 answer
380 views

Identifying phrasal verbs

I'm helping some native English speakers to learn Swedish. I have a large list of sentences which I wish to organise by linking each sentence to its associated set of meanings. For example: Jag: ...
  • 1,042
4 votes
0 answers
560 views

Is there any corpus for idioms?

I'm looking for a corpus for English (American, GB, Australian) idioms. Preferably created manually, because I already have two, but they are rather small and were built semi-automatically.
  • 141
0 votes
1 answer
12k views

What is the difference between "idiom and proverb"? [closed]

For example 'Kick the bucket." Is it an idiom or proverb? How can I recognize them?
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
179 views

Reasons for things named same way in seemingly unrelated languages

How did it come different languages share idiomatic expressions, or name something in same words? Like, take word "inflammation" for example. In English, it's "in(ner)" and "flame". In Ukrainian, it'...
3 votes
1 answer
1k views

How do idioms and metaphors fit into the principle of compositionality?

The principle of compositionality is formulated as: The meaning of a complex expression is a function of the meaning of its parts and of the syntactic rules by which they are combined. (Partee, ...
  • 585
1 vote
1 answer
103 views

Abbreviation taking the meaning of the whole expression

In English and some other languages (such as Portuguese and possibly Italian), the word "calculus" is actually an abbreviation from "differential and integral calculus" that has taken the meaning of ...
  • 1,487
1 vote
2 answers
2k views

Establishing the most common "semantic units" in a corpus

I have a corpus concerning spoken English, where the most common words include: you, the, i, to, a. However, I'm not only interested in words but also groups of consecutive words where the meaning is ...
  • 1,042
5 votes
1 answer
494 views

Body parts and metaphor

Across languages, body parts are used as part of a metaphor, whether it is in an idiom or in a phrasal construction. Do any know of any survey like academic paper that investigates the whys and hows ...
  • 349
1 vote
2 answers
316 views

Which other languages have idiomatic meaning for words meaning 'blue'? [closed]

I came across culture-specific meanings of concept 'blue' (that is, of a colour hue between green and violet) in various languages. We know its idiomatic meanings in Standard or American Englishes, ...
  • 2,731
5 votes
3 answers
439 views

Perception of time

In most cultures and languages, the future is associated with direction ahead of the speaker, while the past is "behind". However, it is the opposite in modern Chinese where future is "behind" and ...
3 votes
0 answers
885 views

Linguistic idiomaticity in different languages

I've been reading this article about linguistic idiomaticity, and there's a good research on English idioms and indirect speech, in general. I've been thinking on different amounts of idiomaticity in ...