Questions tagged [ipa]

The International Phonetic Alphabet: A Latin-based alphabet designed for transcribing all sounds of all languages.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0 votes
0 answers
74 views

Why is schwa considered 'one' sound when it can be pronounced many ways?

I have almost no linguistics knowledge, but apparently schwa is the 'A's in America, the the 'e' in problem, or the O in complete. It's always an unstressed vowel and I guess it's like if you could ...
Jeremy's user avatar
  • 109
0 votes
1 answer
60 views

Lip rounding doesn't transform the close-mid back vowels into each other, so why is the only difference between their names roundedness?

I don't understand why ⟨o⟩ is called the "close-mid back rounded vowel" while ⟨ɤ⟩ is called the "close-mid back unrounded vowel" - they sound completely different and they feel ...
Xiang Yu's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
109 views

Why don’t consonants have a definite pitch?

Is it because consonants are too fast or too slow that we perceive them as indefinite pitches?
Emotion's user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
3 answers
145 views

UCS IPA Extensions: can LATIN SMALL LETTER R WITH FISHHOOK (U+027E) be written without a fishhook?

WARNING: this question is misleading. See my answer below. Apologies and many thanks to drammock and Draconis for their answers too. In general, for example in Times New Roman, U+027E has a fishhook ...
Philippe Cloutier's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
130 views

What is the name of the "clicky" t sound used in some british accents in words like "little" and "mental"?

Emma Stone tries to replicate it here. It's not a glottal stop; the t is definitely being pronounced in the mouth and not the throat. It's almost exclusively used when a "t" sound is ...
keaek's user avatar
  • 23
1 vote
1 answer
68 views

What would an IPA narrow transcription be for Finnish /d/?

From Finnish Sound Structure (Suomi, Toivonen, Ylitalo): The Finnish /d/ is apical alveolar, and the duration of its occlusion is very short, about half of that of /t̪/, ceteris paribus, see e.g. ...
Someone211's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
102 views

What's the nasal phoneme before the "n" in "didn't"?

I've noticed that, in informal American english, we don't pronounce the word "didn't" exactly as /ˈdɪd(ə)nt/. There's a nasal sound right before the "n" that sound a bit like the /...
The_Animator's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
182 views

Why does the French consonant "b" sound so different from the "b" in the IPA chart (with audio)?

Why does the French consonant "b" sound so different from the "b" in the IPA chart (with audio)? I have compared many IPA chart audios, and the "b" in all IPA charts I ...
Wilks's user avatar
  • 1
2 votes
3 answers
299 views

Is DŽ actually ĎŽ?

I am from the Czech Republic, and one thing that has always bothered me is that a lot of English (and other) loanwords were written in Czech with "dž" in place of the English J, e.g. "...
Detheroc's user avatar
  • 121
1 vote
2 answers
172 views

Is there any reliable way to organize phonemes that aren't in the IPA?

I'm coming up with an idea for a game that simulates the evolution of languages, but to do that and make it the most realistic, I would need to put in the sounds that the IPA says are possible but we ...
Anonymous's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
63 views

If you hear three sounds in the pronunciation of wuss, are they correctly described?

Go here https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/wuss and play the pronunciation. I hear the semiconsonant/semivowel /w/ clearly, but then to me follows a short /ə/ or a sound more to the Romanian /ɨ/ than the ...
DanielC's user avatar
  • 103
2 votes
3 answers
214 views

Is there any sound change that can result in /ɞ/?

I am making a conlang where one of the distinctive sounds is /ɞ/. It is a rare vowel sound, and I searched Index Diachronica but couldn't find a sound change that results in it. The sound also does ...
Neil Iyer's user avatar
  • 123
2 votes
1 answer
226 views

Is this diagram accurate for [ɾʲ]

I've been having trouble realizing the /ɾʲ/ sound in Irish, and I wanted to know if I am interpreting the IPA correctly. I find it very difficult to tap the alveolus with my tongue raised to the ...
Sriotchilism O'Zaic's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
149 views

Most and least common places of articulation across world's languages

Which place of articulation is most common for oral pulmonic stops in the world's languages? In order, which places of articulation are the LEAST common in the world's languages? In order, which ...
teatime's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes
1 answer
240 views

How to type IPA quickly on Mac?

I want shortcuts (pre-existing or customised) for IPA symbols. I've installed IPA Unicode keyboard, which works fine on notes/ google docs but not on pages. I don't have ms word. Keyman does not come ...
BB12's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes
1 answer
82 views

How exactly are vowel qualities plotted on a neat quadrilateral chart?

How exactly are vowel qualities of a particular speaker, or average qualities of the speakers of an accent, plotted on a neat quadrilateral chart like these (from the Wikipedia articles for Received ...
Vun-Hugh Vaw's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
89 views

How can we represent a stressed monosyllabic word?

According to Wiktionary, in Chinese, the word 是 means "truly; indeed" when it is stressed. However, according to Wikipedia, it appears that the concept of word stress is not applicable to a ...
siffleur's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
227 views

Why is the vowel in “caught” in General American English transcribed to /ɔ/

The /ɔ/ sounds (as in “caught”/“bought”) in RP and GA sound very distinct to me. The one in GA sounds more like /ɒ/ to me. Why isn’t it transcribed to /ɒ/ in the dictionary? And I wonder what the ...
Robin's user avatar
  • 13
1 vote
0 answers
53 views

Swedish dalmål "ö" pronounciation

I speak swedish with a heavy dalmål accent and my pronounciation of the swedish ö feels most similar to ɤ̞ in the IPA chart since my tongue is pretty far back. I could not find this mentioned anywhere ...
Emil's user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
1 answer
51 views

recommendations on turkish-->ipa dictionary

Preferably a research-quality text. It doesn't need to be edited in English necessarily; and can be based on any dialect or standardization since the republics founding. I'm not a native speaker, so I ...
Paul Eugenio's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
1k views

What is the difference between traditional and modern IPA?

I have recently come across this while researching the phonetic spelling for "love", and I have come across a website (the website) that had both traditional and modern IPA spellings (with ...
Beathan Mann's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
149 views

Why does the IPA use four main vowel heights?

Because vowels exist at infinitely precise points on large acoustic and articulatory spectrums (vowel spaces), the study of phonetics uses generalized waypoints to describe them. The International ...
Graham H.'s user avatar
  • 714
0 votes
2 answers
91 views

Can broad and narrow transcription be distinguished by whether a transcription makes use of diacritics?

When doing transcription of English (British or American) in IPA, is broad transcription exactly the kind of transcription which doesn't make use diacritics, and narrow transcription the kind which ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 859
-1 votes
2 answers
200 views

Is the vowel quadrilateral in IPA 3 by 2 or 3 by 3?

I found some difference between the vowel quadrilateral from https://www.internationalphoneticassociation.org/IPAcharts/IPA_chart_orig/pdfs/IPA_Kiel_2020_full.pdf and the one from https://pressbooks....
Tim's user avatar
  • 859
-4 votes
2 answers
136 views

What written notation is used in IPA for the letter "A" in the English words "hand", "man", "and", et cetra?

In American English, the letter "A" is pronounced at least five different ways. What written symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is used for the vowel, or vowel group, shown ...
Samuel Muldoon's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
38 views

How are the varying boundaries of phonemes across idiolects and dialects objectively described?

I am taking a language I know nothing about as an example. In Vietnamese, I am told “hello” is *Xin chào”, pronounced |sin tʃaw|, with a mid tone like saying “aaah” at the doctor, and a falling tone ...
Julius Hamilton's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
665 views

How close are the Italian and the Romanian open central unrounded vowels?

The "a" sound in Italian and Romanian, is identified as the central unrounded vowel and represented as being practically identical, very close to [ä]. Although a is used in these images to ...
cipricus's user avatar
  • 696
2 votes
1 answer
116 views

The pronunciation of nasalized cardinal vowels

I hope to find the standard pronunciations of nasalized cardinal vowels and English vowels. Where can these pronunciations be found? I looked for them in many places. But they can’t be found in IPA’s ...
hangover's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
185 views

Phonemic transcriptions for English compound words

I have a question about the phonemic transcription for compound words in English. Is there a general rule? Specifically, Should there be space/hyphen/no space between each element in a compound? How ...
amai's user avatar
  • 23
7 votes
2 answers
717 views

What does it mean when a phoneme represented by one IPA is "phonetically" a different IPA?

I have been studying Hungarian and its pronunciation for a long time, using references such as the Hungarian Phonology Wikipedia page and comparing that to the General American Phonology page. The ...
David R's user avatar
  • 173
-3 votes
3 answers
168 views

Bilabial speech sounds with lower lip inserted between teeth

I have noticed the existence of several phones that can be produced with a place of articulation that I haven't seen discussed before. Basically, the two lips contact each other (as in bilabial sounds)...
Graham H.'s user avatar
  • 714
1 vote
2 answers
220 views

Single syllable breakdown of the word strawberry in IPA

My intro linguistics class was doing a demonstration of how to break up single syllables into their vowel trees. We came up with three different interrpretations and were looking for more opinions. ...
Laela's user avatar
  • 11
-1 votes
1 answer
51 views

What transliteration/romanization scheme does Strong's Hebrew Dictionary use?

I can't find anywhere a description of how to convert the Strong Hebrew Dictionary pronunciation transliteration entries into IPA, or a close approximation to IPA. What romanization scheme are they ...
Lance's user avatar
  • 4,342
0 votes
2 answers
344 views

There are roughly 46 speech sounds in the English language, however only 26 letters. Why?

There are roughly 44-46 speech sounds in the English language. However, we just have 26 letters which denote some of those 44-46 sounds. Why is that? Why we don't represent each of those 44-46 sounds ...
Harshit Rajput's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
34 views

Is there any free API that can translate from French to IPA? [duplicate]

I have invented a language that actually is just French but each phoneme is replaced by another one. So to build an application that can translate from French to that language, I need the phonetics of ...
nanto's user avatar
  • 9
2 votes
1 answer
111 views

Why are intervocalic coronal plosives apparently so unstable in English?

There are a plethora of words in the English language in which the phonemes /t/ and /d/ appear between two vowels, whether they be in adjacent syllables in the same word or in different words as a ...
Graham H.'s user avatar
  • 714
12 votes
1 answer
2k views

Is the rarity of dental sounds explained by babies not immediately having teeth?

Dental consonants, which involve the corona of the tongue contacting the teeth (typically the upper teeth) are known to be rare throughout the world’s languages. More specifically, phonemic ...
Graham H.'s user avatar
  • 714
-1 votes
2 answers
204 views

Can someone explain the ambiguity of the vowel [ø] and null segment [∅]?

Typically the IPA avoids using the same glyph in different scales to represent similar ideas however it seems to me that the representation of the Close-mid Front Rounded Vowel [ø] and the null marker ...
An Amateurish Linguist's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
457 views

Is there a difference between /tʲ/ (palatalized t) and /kʲ/ (palatalized k)? [closed]

I've noticed that what some languages refer to as "soft k" and others as "soft t" seems to be the same sound. Is it so? I was able to find a wiki page discussing the "soft g&...
Džuris's user avatar
  • 203
0 votes
1 answer
149 views

Why are the coronal approximants so different from the others?

I’m aware that there has been some criticism of the IPA’s classification of approximants, as well as debate over the merit of the term itself. However, my understanding is that approximants are the ...
Graham H.'s user avatar
  • 714
0 votes
0 answers
31 views

Tool for phonetic transcriptions of a specific list of words

Looking for a tool that will accept a file with a list of Basic English words as input and give the phonetic spellings/ transcriptions of the words in IPA as output. If that's not available, any ...
Meenu's user avatar
  • 41
-1 votes
1 answer
86 views

How do I represent SAMPA glottal stops in IPA?

I come from SAMPA world, and I am used to using a glottal stop. In German language, glottal stops are quite common: For example: z i ts ? E k @ The "?" is the glottal stop and intrudes a ...
tmighty's user avatar
  • 109
4 votes
1 answer
432 views

What is unicode character turned AE ᴂ(U+1D02) used for?

The near-open front unrounded vowel is written as æ(U+00E6), commented as "Latin Small Letter Ae". But I found the character ᴂ(U+1D02) commented as "Latin Small Letter Turned Ae" ...
C.K.'s user avatar
  • 301
0 votes
0 answers
43 views

Could the Midwestern (Wisconsin) L sound be described as a semivowel/glide?

In Midwestern accents, words like "love" (with the L in word initial) the L sounds close to the /j/ glide, but I wonder if anyone has noticed this or come across it.
Mahesh Sundaram's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
107 views

Voiceless Schwa after a plosive consonant

Take American English as an example, what is the difference in sounding between [pʰə̥ˈtʰeɪ̯ɾoʊ̯] and [pʰˈtʰeɪ̯ɾoʊ̯]?
Gaai Chia's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
126 views

Difference between Cantonese /gw/ and Mandarin /gu/?

As a native speaker of both languages, Cantonese /gw/ like in 過gwo3 and Mandarin /gu/ like in 过guo4 sounds the same, but I've checked that the Cantonese one is [kʷɔː] while the Mandarin one is [kwo], ...
Gaai Chia's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
60 views

The o-o-o-ol’ shakuh-shakuh: how can we describe this extended “o” sound?

Just after the 3-minute mark in this video, the chef tells us to give the pot “the o-o-o-ol’ shakuh-shakuh“. I think the pronunciation is in imitation of a stereotypical elderly man. I would like to ...
Guest's user avatar
  • 21
1 vote
1 answer
133 views

why pronunciations of cardinal vowel No.4 [a] are so different?

The cardinal vowel No.4 [a] pronounced by Daniel Jones and some other linguistics sounds more like /æ/ as in cat. but this cardinal vowel pronounced in the IPA website(by 4 speakers) sounds more like ...
hangover's user avatar
-2 votes
2 answers
116 views

Why the phonetic /ɔ/ is used in totally two different position?

Why the phonetic /ɔ/ is related to the phonetic /ɑ/ and the phonetic /oʊ/ at the same time even though they're totally different in pronunciation? /ɔ/&/ɑ/ /ɔ/ Awesome, autumn, Australia, Talk, ...
Abdullah 's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
139 views

What is the difference between these three IPA phonetics in American pronunciation?

"ɔ" Like (awesome, autumn, Australia), "ɒ" Like (octopus, October, occupy), "ɑ" Like (arm, art, argument). I know it's going to be hard to explain them in writing, but ...
Abdullah 's user avatar

1
2 3 4 5
8