Questions tagged [ipa]

The International Phonetic Alphabet: A Latin-based alphabet designed for transcribing all sounds of all languages.

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1answer
105 views

Is there any articulatory difference between these two IPA symbols?

Is there an articulatory difference between the voiced palatal nasal [ɲ] sound and the nasalized voiced palatal approximant [j̃] sound? If there is a diference, what is it? I ask that because in ...
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When enclosing a phonetical annotation, what are the differences between [] and //? [duplicate]

When enclosing a phonetical annotation, what are the differences between [] and //? Are they not completely equivalent?
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/t͡ʃ/ vs. /ʧ/ vs. /tʃ/

In English for example, the "ch" sound (as in China) is sometimes written as /t͡ʃ/, other times as /ʧ/ or simply as /tʃ/. Similarly, I have seen the German "tz" (e.g. Katze) ...
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1answer
80 views

How do you transcribe these sounds you make in IPA?

Uvular ejective fricative χʼ? I don’t know. It seems not. https://youtu.be/3u65Dk1bqWg?t=584 https://youtu.be/d3oBs5TljNE?t=8193 https://youtu.be/B2FkJVj2hj4?t=39 https://youtu.be/quF-CDV3K68?t=223 ...
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1answer
75 views

Has anyone ever ranked the prevalence of phones by number of speakers worldwide?

I'm interested in knowing the most-used and least-used phones worldwide. According to Wikipedia, the IPA charts about 140 pulmonic consonants, 80 non-pulmonic consonants, 30 co-articulated consonants, ...
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1answer
215 views

Does the orientation of the voiced uvular fricative IPA symbol (ʁ) not matter, or are these fonts buggy?

The symbol for voiced uvular fricative in IPA is ʁ (an inverted small uppercase letter "R"), but I have noticed that this symbol is not displayed consistently depending on where it is pasted ...
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1answer
102 views

Why does IPA have only finitely many symbols? Isn't the human voice box capable of producing a continuous range of sounds?

There are two things I've noticed: Every language has only finitely many sounds in it IPA, which is a notation for representing all possible sounds in all possible languages, has only finitely many ...
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110 views

How can I find IPA charts that pairs each language's phonemes, with a common word feat. that phoneme in that language?

How can I find equivalents to the following chart (for American English), but for the world's currently most spoken e-languages? E.g., the chart for Modern German must SCHEMATICALLY map out each of ...
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1answer
72 views

Simple Way to Determine if IPA Words Rhyme (English)

As a follow-up to my question at Mathematics of Rhyme (perfect, slant), I have been able to map most English words to IPA using a mix of custom code and a dictionary stored at flancast90.github.io. ...
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2answers
58 views

Proper phonetic names and IPA symbols for Russian [i] in линия and English [i] in happy

They have [i] on both IPA:Russian wiki and IPA:English wiki On the Russian page the example is линия and on the English page it's happy. And in practice these are similar but clearly different sounds ...
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974 views

What is the difference between /ʎ/ and /l̠ʲ/?

As far as I can find the descriptions it appears that they're the same. Why would 2 different IPA characters used then?
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783 views

Is it possible to have the same symbol for different sounds in IPA?

It is said that in IPA, each symbol represents a unique sound. But on the Wikipedia page on the Voiceless Velar Fricative (/x/), I find these examples: Hindustani 'ख़ुशी' /xuʃi:/ (sometimes खुशी, /...
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ʃ pronounced with tongue

Some people pronounce their [ʃ] not in the 'classic' way but by curving the tongue and bringing it forward toward the upper set of teeth. Here's an audio example I've created. My question: is there a ...
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731 views

Where are these Danish sounds in IPA?

I worked with a native Danish translator, using a simplified version of IPA for transcribing Danish words into their pronunciation. They pointed out 3 sounds that weren't covered by the system (which ...
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108 views

What is the difference between ðˤ and ðʕ in Arabic?

I am wondering if the emphatic and pharyngealized sounds of Arabic are the same thing as the letter followed by /ʕ/. So ðˤ, sˤ, tˤ, and dˤ would be ðʕ, sʕ, tʕ, and dʕ. If it's not the case, can you ...
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What is "˥˩" in the IPA?

While reading the Wikipedia page on voiced bilabial trill, I came across a transcription in the occurrence section which looks like: [tʙ̩˥˩] The word is from Lizu language and means 'bean'. What is ...
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Probability based algorithm to convert IPA into english language text

For a student job i'm creating a neural network-based method of determining the probability that two written names are referring to the same person (e.g. what is the probability that kelly m. refers ...
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1answer
137 views

order of tables in the IPA chart -- is there a reason?

I was told by a friend that the order of tables in the IPA chart is not completely arbitrary, but has some motivation to it. In particular, that C tables come before the V table, as features of C ...
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1answer
94 views

Breaking a word down into its constituent phonemes [duplicate]

How should the nonsense word 'frabjous' be broken down into its constituent phonemes (e.g. the consonant blend -fr)? I would like to determine how this word is regular in English phonotactics.
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1answer
200 views

Why are bilabial lateral sounds deemed impossible?

On the IPA consonant chart they are greyed out as impossible to occur. But I can easily clamp my tongue between my lips, or I can close only the center of my lips, either way leaving a narrow hole on ...
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1answer
131 views

How comprehensive is SLIPA?

I know that SLIPA is a first go around at making an IPA table for signed languages, but how comprehensive is it? The creator freely admits that his main exposure to sign languages is ASL, which ...
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152 views

Is there any word in other languages that begins with the urdu alphabet ṛē (ڑ‎)?

So in Urdu language there is no word starting with Ṛe "ڑ" IPA /ɽ/ but I think there may be some words in another language that begins with Ṛe "ڑ" or have similar sound.
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489 views

How do you bound a syllable / split a word into syllables programmatically?

What are the rules for bounding a syllable? I am trying to take IPA text and write software to automatically separate the syllables for the word. By trying I am still just thinking about how to do it. ...
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2answers
836 views

What is the IPA of the two-syllable r sound in English?

For example, the word "Emperor" in IPA on Wiktionary for General American is written /ˈɛmpɹɚ/. But that's kind of cheating because ɚ is basically /ɹ/ as far as I can tell. Yet, when you say ...
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106 views

Narrow Transcription: How is "very narrow allophonic" transcription identical to "impressionistic" transcription enabling something extra?

English: "check the lens well" Phonetic (broad) transcription: /tʃɛkðəlɛnzwɛl/ Impressionistic narrow transcription: [tʃe̞ʔ͡kð̞əlɛ̆nzwæ̠ɫ] (One) very narrow allophonic transcription: [...
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1answer
87 views

IPA Terminology--Articulatory Target versus Articulators

In phonetics (IPA) terminology, what is the difference between an Articulatory Target and an Articulator. I used to think that the former is just another name for the Passive Articulator or the Place ...
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What is the origin of the pronunciation difference between 'replicate' (noun) and 'replicate' (verb)?

In English, the noun 'replicate' is pronounced with a schwa (ə) at the end while the verb is pronounced with the diphthong 'eɪ'. The same is true for the word 'duplicate'. Is there a more general ...
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0answers
72 views

Intuitive phonemic transcription systems for various languages

When a text or video about pronunciation is aimed at the average reader, it often doesn't use the IPA to represent sounds. Instead, it might talk about the "AW" sound as in law, the "AH&...
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294 views

Pronunciation of double IPA consonants

Let's say an IPA pronunciation contains a double consonant, such as "dd" or "ss". Does that really mean this consonant should be pronounced twice? There are examples where this ...
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Central – lateral dichotomy for labiodentals

In the IPA chart, there's no labiodental lateral approximant. The cell isn't even left blank, it's shaded out and therefore the articulation is judged impossible. One of the explanations is (see, e.g.,...
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134 views

Is [ë̞] another symbol for [ə]?

I know that the diacritic ̈ is for centralization and ̞ for lowered. So when [e] is centralized, it becomes [ɘ] and when lowered it becomes [ə]. See the diagram: If someone gives me the ...
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2answers
123 views

What is the exact position of the tongue for [ n ] in these circumstances?

Hi I am an English learner, and I recently had this question about pronouncing n sound. I understand the standard way of pronouncing n sound is to put my tongue behind the top teeth, however, when I ...
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78 views

What cues would you look for in this spectrogram to figure out the word? [closed]

(It is produced in American English and the word is one syllable. The time scale is arbitrary so feel free to ignore it.) I was wondering what cues everyone would look for when reading this, and ...
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1answer
188 views

How can the continuum s-sʲ-ç-ɕ-ʃ-ʂ be described in technical terms?

To me, it seems clear that there is a continuum between this group of sounds, as all of them (apart from ç, which I will touch on later in the post) are sibilants, and the only difference between them ...
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374 views

Why does Polish have male and female accents?

This is particularly interesting to me as I can't seem to find any information on the topic, but, having listened to numerous Polish speakers from both sexes, the male─female pronounciational split is ...
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1answer
162 views

What is the difference between m̥, mʰ, and mʱ?

I am looking at Help:IPA/Nguni and Help:IPA/Welsh, and wondering what the exact difference is between these sounds, and if there are any good audio recordings (or if you can make one!) showing how ...
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2answers
387 views

What IPA sound is the danish "l"-ish sound as in "sidde"?

I have an ASCII system for writing sounds mapped to IPA letters, but I can't figure out what the "l" sound is as in Danish "sidde". It's pronounced sort of like (if I were to try ...
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1answer
93 views

What is the diacritic macron bellow (◌̱) used in the IPA [closed]

Well, I'm learning English, (I speak Spanish) sometimes I use the translator or the dictionary and several times I find this sign in the phonetic transcription, what am I supposed to do?
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2answers
186 views

Is it possible to automatically recognize a single syllable as its IPA transcription?

Is it possible to take a sound file as the input, in which there is a single syllable, and we can get the IPA transcription of the syllable automatically? If it is, how? Or to say is there already a ...
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25 views

Guessing phoneme duration for english words

Is there an existing method or dataset, which, given just a word in English (no context), could give a best guess as to how long to make each phoneme when recreating it as speech? Obviously the true ...
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2answers
147 views

[a̟]: advanced front vowel?

I saw [a̟] in PHOIBLE and thought "okay, it's an advanced front vowel-- hold on, it's already in the front." Is it an error in PHOIBLE or an error in my linguistic knowledge? What effect ...
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1answer
68 views

When we breathe through the nose, do we normally make an unvoiced uvular nasal?

I was thinking about what sounds we make when we breathe through our nose. I realized that we make a sound that is very far back, farther than the velar nasal. Do we normally make this sound, and is ...
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773 views

What do you call double consonants that are not affricates?

For example, the IPA Help page for English lists these consonants: hw whine lj lute nj new sj consume θj enthuse zj Zeus Is there a name to refer to this type of double consonants? I'm thinking &...
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398 views

IPA diacritic for "no oral release" of nasals

Is there a diacritic in IPA for explicitly marking a nasal consonant as orally released (like coda nasals in careful speech in English) or having no oral release (like coda nasals in Cantonese)? In ...
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1answer
402 views

Is a diphthong nasalized before a nasal?

I am learning IPA and I learned that vowels are nasalized before nasals. When we are transcribing nasalized vowels, we write the tilde over them to denote that they are nasalized. My question is "...
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186 views

What does the ◌͇ diacritic mean in the IPA?

I once saw [ʐ͇] and couldn't figure out what the diacritic meant. Any help is appreciated.
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1answer
134 views

Differences between /ᵐb/ (prenasalization) and /mb/

What's the difference between prenasalized voced plosive /ᵐb/ and just the sound /mb/, if any? I've watched this video where /ᵐbʷ/ is pronounced, and I'd pronounce /mbʷ/ in the same way.
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230 views

About the "ᵊ" superscript in IPA

I apologize for a diletant question but does "ə" in "piᵊŋ" indicate a secondary articulation? I couldn't find it in the list of "Co-articulation diacritics" on Wikipedia'...
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Is there a reason that /w/ isn't represented on the IPA chart?

The sound that represents the English <w>, as in "week", is the voiced labio-velar approximant /w/. In the "Consonant" section of the Wiki page for the IPA, however, /w/ isn'...
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196 views

Is h↓ the correct IPA representation of the ingressive "fast gasp", meaning "uh-huh", in French?

Spoken French has two ingressive forms of "yes". One is "ouais" [wɛ↓], equivalent to "yep" in English. The other is a "pure" ingressive sound, described ...

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