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Questions tagged [italian]

A Romance language spoken mainly in Italy, but also in Switzerland, San Marino and others.

2
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1answer
95 views

Phonological rule for realizations of Italian /s/

It seems that realization of Italian /s/ is not fully systematic and there are some exceptions. Is there any phonological rule for possible realizations of Italian /s/
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0answers
84 views

Is Italian the only modern language that uses the feminine 3rd person singular pronoun for formal speech?

Is Italian the only modern language that uses the feminine 3rd person singular pronoun (Lei) for formal speech, regardless of the gender of the 2nd person singular addressee? cf. T–V_distinction#...
2
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0answers
58 views

Andrea Bocelli Aspiration

I have been listen to Andrea Bocelli's songs lately. A noticeable feature of his pronunciation while singing Spanish songs is that he constantly pronounces the plosives (especially at word-initial ...
6
votes
1answer
395 views

Why does Italian use definite articles before possessive adjectives, except when these are followed by a singular family noun?

In Italian possessive adjectives are preceded by a definite article: “il mio amico” (the my friend), “la nostra casa”, “i tuoi libri”. The article however is always dropped with singular nouns ...
5
votes
1answer
73 views

Calabrian/Sicilian and unstressed e/o

I sorta-kinda was "taught" that Sicilian turns all unstressed "e"s to "i"s and "o"s to "u"s. Then I got to know a couple Calabrian songs whose dialect seemed almost Sicilian, so I extended that ...
7
votes
3answers
256 views

Any other example of “socially stigmatized phoneme” like the “th” sound in some Venetian dialect?

Older people living in some rural areas north of Venice use the voiceless dental fricative /θ/ for many words, like cena "supper" which is pronounced θena, exactly like in Spanish cena (Castilian, not ...
3
votes
1answer
102 views

English “fruit” vs Italian “frutta” plural number

So I was listening to: "Story of Human Language - John McWhorter" and I stumbled upon an example of errors foreigners could do while speaking English (at least the American variant), mainly: This ...
3
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1answer
202 views

Why do Croatian and Italian contain the same grammatical endings for nouns and verbs?

Italy is a country in the Southern Europe. Croatia is a country in the South-Eastern Europe (or Central, depending on interpretation). Because of the close geographical proximity, these two could have ...
1
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1answer
566 views

Italian: is there an authoritative word frequency list?

I'm having difficulty finding a good frequency list for the Italian language (lemmas, not including inflected word forms). Anyone know if there's some research or website or institute where I could ...
2
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1answer
247 views

Expressions derived from Italian mafia

I apologize in advance for the explicit words, the question is anyway purely linguistical. Feel free to censore the words if appropriate. I have heard that the American slang expression "Do not break ...
3
votes
1answer
92 views

Where are clitics initially Merged in Italian?

I'm trying to port Cardinaletti & Shlonsky's analysis of Italian clitic placement1 to the Minimalist framework for a term paper. The course is based on Adger's textbook2 which mostly focuses on ...
5
votes
1answer
184 views

Why do Spanish and other Romance Languages use the preposition “a” for culinary styles?

I've looked in the Real Academia Española dictionary and I can't find any information regarding why Spanish uses the preposition a for cooking styles, and I've noticed French and Italian do it too. I ...
2
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1answer
106 views

More or less - Widespread idiom?

I've encountered more or less in many different languages. Why is this idiom so widespread? In a few other languages such as Italian it's "more or less", but in Albanian it's "less or more".
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0answers
63 views

Where can I get data set for metaphony in Italian dialects?

The problem is that most sources refer to phonological data collected a long time ago. Where can I get some fresh stuff to analyze?
4
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2answers
227 views

From Italian to Spanish, I to L

Why is it, that in words like plaza to piazza, or blanca to bianca, the l in spanish turns into an i in italian? Is there a preference for this kind of sound in Italian, or is there another reason?
4
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1answer
530 views

Do we know if the Dutch vulgar/slang term “stront” is related to the Italian vulgar/slang term “stronzo”?

I have for years known that there was a Dutch bad word "stront" meaning "shit" but I expected it was spelled "stroent" until I looked it up just now. I have also known the Italian bad word "stronzo" ...
1
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1answer
61 views

grammatical role of the word “e” in Emiliano and Romagnolo languages

What is grammatical role of e word in Emiliano and Romagnolo languages? Notice the following excerpt: > La léngua emiliâna-rumagnōla l’é parlêda int l’Emélia-Rumâgna, int la pêrt ed sōvra dal ...
3
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0answers
185 views

Has the use of body gestures during speech production the same importance in every culture?

I know that different cultures may use different (hand or other body part) gestures to convey the same meaning. But is the amount of gestures similar in number among cultures? Some recent research, ...
3
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2answers
2k views

What are the most specific features of Tuscan dialect of Italian?

And is Tuscan regarded as a dialect or as a language by modern Italian linguists? I am interested mostly in its lexical peculiarities, but some interesting features of syntax would be of a great ...
1
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1answer
618 views

Are there glides in Italian?

Italian has diphthongs when you put together two vowels, like in the word "uomo". As far as I understand a diphthong is not necessarily a glide, because a glide has to be less sonorous than a vowel. ...
4
votes
2answers
324 views

What language do children think in?

If a child born in Canada is spoken to strictly in another foreign tongue other than english (ie. Italian), it is inevitable that this child will also think in Italian. When this child starts going ...
2
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3answers
380 views

Are there any specific traits in Italian which make it different from other Romance languages?

Although Wikipedia says 'the grammar is typical of the grammar of Romance languages', I suppose some ancient Italic (or perhaps even pre-italic) traits might prevail. I am especially curious about ...
4
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8answers
2k views

Do I need to learn Esperanto? [closed]

I am native Armenian speaker. I know Russian from childhood. Recent years English became my second language and I am using it in everywhere except interaction with friends. Now I want to learn Italian....
5
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1answer
197 views

To what extent do African dialects of Italian differ from their European counterparts?

According to Wikipedia, Italian is spoken to some degree in Libya, Eritrea and Federal Republic of Somalia. Are there in Africa any clearly different varieties of this language which have distinct ...
9
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4answers
1k views

Italian passato prossimo agrees with subject with 'essere' but not 'avere'. Why?

Another question about Italian grammar aside from this one which has bugged me for ages. In Italian, when forming the passato prossimo with an intransitive verb, we use forms of the auxiliary verb ...
14
votes
1answer
383 views

Italian past participle ending -uto

Why, in the paradigm for Italian past participles ending in -ere, does the regular past participle end in -uto? Whence the vowel, when the other two paradigms have -ato and -ito?
9
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2answers
491 views

What is this phenomenon called, and is it the only occurrence?

Usually it's fairly easy to know the spelling of words in Italian, given the very close relation between that and pronunciation. But that's not always true. The word musulmano in Italian (which means ...
14
votes
2answers
4k views

How did Italian manage to stay (mostly) phonetically spelled despite its long written tradition?

Italian is commonly cited as an example of a phonetically spelled language. It is easy to guess how an Italian word is pronounced based on the way it is written, because each written symbol highly ...
14
votes
7answers
655 views

“Overabundant nouns” in Italian: do they exist in other languages?

Under my answer to that question, I talked about a category of nouns that exist in Italian. The italian name is "Nomi sovrabbondanti" or "sostantivi sovrabbondanti", the meaning is roughly "...