Questions tagged [korean]

Official language of both South and North Korea, normally written in a script called Hangul, and widely believed to be a language isolate.

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6
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1answer
164 views

Did the removal of Chinese characters have an impact on Korean and Vietnamese?

Korean and Vietnamese used to have Chinese characters but no longer do; there has been talk (e.g. here) of doing the same in Japanese. Has there been an impact on the language? for instance changed ...
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1answer
111 views

Limitations of the parrot speech?

I was seeing a video of a parrot speaking Korean, and I thought the way the parrots distinct between aspiration. As I am not Korean, I really do not know. What kind of distinctions a parrot can make ...
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Do North and South Korean accents in Mandarin differ significantly?

I was watching a documentary about North Korean escapees living in China. It mentioned that some of these escapees were worried that their "North Korean" accent when speaking Mandarin would give them ...
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1answer
682 views

Why is Hangul (Korean script) not considered an Abugida

Abugida is a language where consonant and vowels form a unit of some form, and are typical in South Asia. Now, the Korean language isn't related to those languages, of course. But the Korean language ...
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3answers
83 views

Why are ㅔ and ㅐ referred to as diphthongs?

Why are ㅔ and ㅐ referred to as diphthongs in some Korean teaching materials even though the equivalent sounds (/e/, /ɛ/) do not constitute a change from one sound to another? I understand the ...
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1answer
94 views

Explain ㅎ being silent in Korean language

A: Between vowels, /h/ may either be voiced [ɦ] or become inaudible or disappear often. B: Intervocalically, it is realized as voiced [ɦ], and after voiced consonants it is either [ɦ] or silent. ...
5
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1answer
302 views

Did Google Translate supply North Korea with the word “dotard” because of J.R.R. Tolkien's “Lord of the Rings”?

This question contains some speculation that a good answer would confirm or deny: The North Korean government recently released a statement that referred to Donald Trump, the current US president, as ...
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4answers
5k views

Why do Korean and Japanese sound similar to each other to native speakers of English?

I don't understand why, but Korean and Japanese sound very similar to me, and also to other native speakers of English. I think I once read a comment saying something like "If it sounds like Japanese ...
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2answers
1k views

Is use of sorting expected and used in East Asian languages (Chinese, Japanese, Korean)?

For an English speaker with 26 characters, the concept of sorting is ubiquitous. If I see a list, I inherently expect it to be sorted by one of the columns, and of course clicking a column to sort is ...
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2answers
403 views

Contrast of degree of aspiration in Korean

I am learning Korean pronunciation, and find it reported that the distinguishing feature of Korean consonants such as orthographic ㅂ (b) and ㅍ (p) is aspiration. However, to my ears both (b) and (p) (...
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1answer
210 views

What is tenseness with respect to consonants?

In korean, consonants are divided into three categories of articulation or coarticulation, one of them is called Tenseness. In korean orthography, tensed consonants are written with a reduplicated ...
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371 views

What are arguments for and against a common origin of Korean and Japanese?

Now, Korean and Japanese have been proposed to be part of other language families, for instance Altaic, but Altaic is not considered a valid term subterfuged by evidence as much as Sino-Tibetan and ...
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4k views

Why is Korean considered a language isolate?

According to the Wikipedia article on Koreanic languages: Among extant languages, Korean is considered by most linguists to be a language isolate and by others as part of the widely rejected ...
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2answers
274 views

When transliterating English words to Korean, why does the first F become a ㅎ?

(EDIT: this question now has a new home at https://korean.stackexchange.com/) (Please visit https://korean.stackexchange.com/ for questions about Korean language) Most Korean words and sounds do not ...
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2k views

Looking for korean text corpus

I'm looking for a list of text corpus for korean. Is there any web site where I can find it? Regards.
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1answer
275 views

Irregular Fortition(경음화, 된소리 되기) in Modern Korean

I'm asking this question as a non-linguist native Korean speaker. I will use the word "fortition" as a translation of 경음화 or 된소리 되기. The Standard Korean (표준어) does define some complicated rules for ...
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1answer
356 views

Why does gang-nam and viet-nam both contain nam meaning south when one is in Korean the other Vietnamese?

Does anyone know why there is a character that is common to both the Koreans and the Vietnamese? Are there any other examples of these kind of similarity?
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3answers
162 views

Is the social relationship between listener and referent grammatically realized in japanese or korean?

I know that the social relationship between speaker, listener and referent are grammatically realized in japanese and korean. I know there are different levels for the relation between speaker and ...
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1answer
383 views

“Regarding” in Korean and Japanese

To mark what is being regarded in Japanese is について (nitsuite), and in Korean, 에, but do these two concepts completely overlap? 돼지고기에 질렸어요. I got tired of pork Would a translation into Japanese ...
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1answer
448 views

The true place of articulation of Korean affricates

About a month ago I began studying Korean and I am now at a stage where I have some familiarity with the writing system and the phonology. A native speaker is available to me, and while she tells me ...
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2answers
2k views

need to understand infinitive

What is the easiest way to understand what an infinitive is? How do I know which verb in which sentence is an infinitive? For example, let us take this website: Infinitive This is the example I am ...
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1answer
398 views

Does Korean have two classes of adjectives correlating to the -i and -na adjectives of Japanese?

It's widely claimed that Japanese and Korean have very similar grammars despite their differences in (non Chinese-derived) lexicon. Whether they're actually genetically related can be regarded as an ...
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1answer
198 views

What was the most usual and most recent system of writing Korean without any hangul at all?

It's proving quite difficult to learn some of the facts about written Korean before hangul was given official status by the government. We know that metal movable type printing was inventing in Korea ...
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2answers
529 views

Are there other languages where pronouns behave like they do in Japanese, Korean, and Ryukyuan?

In Japanese and Korean (and I have to assume the Okinawan / Ryukyuan languages also), pronouns are quite different from most other languages from most families in at least two ways I can think of: ...
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4answers
947 views

Can the Chinese script be used to record non-Chinese languages?

I know of at least 3 countries in the Sinosphere that have historically used the Chinese script (or scripts derived from it) - Vietnam, Korea, and Japan. So how did it work? Did they use it to read ...
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1answer
567 views

Is it accurate - Chinese Wikipedia on Japanese/Korean classification

I'm not very updated on random theories regarding the Altaic theory (which I personally am agnostic about; though I slant towards not believing in it due to the extreme lack of any regular sound ...
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1answer
3k views

Relationship between Turkish/Azeri and Japanese/Korean

How are Turkish and Azeri related to Japanese and Korean? Are there obvious similarities between them?
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1answer
343 views

Where can orthographic Korean words be split at the end of a line?

Unlike Chinese and Japanese, Korean does employ spaces between words. What constitutes a lexical word differs from what constitutes an orthographic word. For instance, particles which can is some ...
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2answers
6k views

Korean syllable-final ㅅ in Hangul transcription of loanwords

Why are English loanwords ending in /d/ or /t/ systematically transcribed into Hangul syllables ending in ㅅ rather than ㄷ? This seems strange, since when ㅅ is followed by a vowel, the coda is realised ...
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1answer
1k views

Criteria for separating Korean words

The rules for when whitespace is required/permitted in Korean are not obvious, but are not explicitly discussed in any grammars or textbooks I have access to. I can infer this much: Between ...
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5answers
40k views

How to distinguish Korean “ㅔ” /e/ and “ㅐ” /ɛ/?

I've always had trouble with the distinction between the "e"-like vowels in European languages: /e/ vs /ɛ/. But pronouncing them the same has never caused me any problems. In fact I don't even know ...
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1answer
619 views

Rules of Yale Romanization of Korean

This is kind of a specific question, though it appears there is no StackExchange forum for the Korean language... What are the specific rules in Yale Romanization of Korean with regard to where to ...
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4answers
754 views

How common is a topic particle beyond just Japanese and Korean?

Both Japanese and Korean are "topic-comment" languages and both have an explicit topic particle. (I believe Chinese might be an example of a topic-comment language without a topic particle but I may ...
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2answers
745 views

Are there other pairs of languages that are as close grammatically despite not being in the same language family as Korean and Japanese?

Though there are many theories grouping Korean and Japanese in the same family, none of these are widely accepted by linguists. Yet the grammars of these two languages are extremely similar in many ...
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5answers
5k views

How did Korean become a language isolate?

According to most linguists, Korean is a language isolate. Why doesn't it have any sister languages, like languages usually do? Why didn't it spread to other areas, or split into various languages? ...
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6answers
2k views

Are the Japanese and Korean subject particles known to be related in any way, including by Sprachbund?

Japanese and Korean have strikingly similar grammars but whether they are related or not is an open question. Both languages have a particle to mark the grammatical subject of a sentence and in fact ...