Questions tagged [modal-verbs]

Questions on modal verbs (such as the English verbs can, might, must, should, etc.)

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How can we say modals are of category T, but auxiliaries are really verbs? [duplicate]

Are there any arguments or theories to account for it?
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1answer
86 views

Pattern of use of modal verbs across languages

So I am toying with language and understand how to treat basic verbs and nouns and adjectives. But I am stuck on modal verbs like "I should have gone home". I would like to know basically a cheat ...
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1answer
38 views

What words relate to thinking about possible events? (Could've Should've Would've) [closed]

I'm thinking about how the mind works, and how the mind dreams or simulates events. This seems to be an important part of how the brain works so it seems like we should have special words to describe ...
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A question about Carnie's subcategories and features

From Carnie's "Syntax: A Generative Introduction": This notation is not explicitly explained. What does it mean? (I'll write my conjecture below) Recall that T is defined as follows: So I guess the ...
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211 views

Is it a causative morpheme or a modal morpheme?

Let us take the verb 'get', we can say both: 1- Someone gets to take something 2- Someone gets someone to take something In the 1st sentence, 'get' is a modal morpheme, but in the other sentence '...
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6answers
602 views

Are English modal verbs tensed or non-tensed?

My assumption: English modal verbs are non-tensed (i.e. we don't say shoulds or shoulded). Yet, in X' bar theory, modal verbs appear under the inflection node I', precisely where we find the ...
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83 views

Impact of European languages on AmE modality and grammatical moods

American English Use subjunctive more than British English and also they heavily use modal verb "would". Grammatical moods like subjunctive in many European languages like German and Spanish are ...
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How can I write subject and predicate phrases so they can be interchanged for a multiple-choice test and still have subject-verb agreement?

I’m trying to write a large set of multiple-choice test questions that can easily be randomized by interchanging their subject phrases and predicate phrases. I’m having some difficulty finding verbs ...
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2answers
149 views

What type of modality is “You must not fear”?

Someone challenged me to translate the phrase "You must not fear" into my conlang, and I was stumped, because I couldn't pin down the modality of the phrase. I came up with a phrase meaning "You are ...
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4answers
911 views

Are modal verbs lexical or grammatical categories?

Are modal verbs, such as must and can, considered lexical or grammatical categories?
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'modal' vs 'mode' vs 'modality' vs 'mood'

TL;DR (Actual Question:) I'm wildered; so please explain as though I were 10 years old. What are the similarities and differences? This doesn`t compare all 4 nouns simultaneously. A Student's ...
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367 views

Epistemic modality inside deontic scope?

I was taught (according to Role and Reference Grammar) that epistemic modality applies at clause level while deontic modality applies at core level. So in theory a sentence which has both would have ...
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Distinguishing between epistemic and circumstantial readings (without recourse to temporality)?

How can you/should you empirically distinguish between epistemic and circumstantial readings of modals? I (at least think I) understand how the two readings are supposed to be distinguished ...