Questions tagged [morphemes]

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Criteria for judging allomorphs and different morphemes?

I read in Crystal, D. (2008) that “Some morphemes...are realized by more than one morph according to their position in a word or sentence, such alternative morphs [are] called allomorphs” (p.313), and ...
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Modern authoritive textbook for morpheme analyses

I have been reading several books dealing with morpheme/semanteme, etc...But some of them are a few decades old and don't deal exclusively with the subject in the scope of Lexicology. So I would like ...
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1answer
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Is there an online Esperanto word stem “diagrammer?”

I'm wondering if there is a site or resource that will take an Esperanto word and diagram the different components. For example, given "malsanulejo," the "diagrammer" would return something like: mal-...
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4answers
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Examples of words that are monomorphemic in English, but polymorphemic in other languages

I'm looking for words that are monomorphemic in English – preferably basic words describing things in nature such as star, water, tree, grass, etc. – but polymorphemic in other languages. It would be ...
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Does “tetrahedrization” make sense?

I am deciding on a spelling of "tessellation composed of tetrahedra" to use in my thesis. There are four choices I know of Tetrahedralization with 3,530 results on Google Scholar and 25,800 on ...
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1answer
105 views

Why are pronouns considered grammatical (functional) morphemes?

Grammatical/functional morphemes are generally defined as morphemes that modify meaning, as opposed to lexical/content morphemes which supply a root meaning. In my intuition, a pronoun – although its ...
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2answers
844 views

What exactly a morpheme is

It says that morphemes include un-, -ed, -ness, and re-, in addition to words like town or chair or computer, words that can't be broken down. But computer comes from compute and -er. And compute ...
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2answers
186 views

Is a full stop a morpheme?

Is a full stop, represented by the graphical character '.', a morpheme? I haven't found a source either confirming or denying this, but the examples I've seen seem to indicate that the answer is no.
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1answer
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Is longish an inflected form of long or a lexeme?

I am a bit confused on this, since "-ish" is a a derivational morpheme for forming adjectives meaning "somewhat Adjective". Based on my knowledge, a comparative is made by the suffix "-er" and not "-...
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1answer
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Why is it problematic to assume a null morpheme signifying the singular number of nouns in German?

In a lecture, my professor said that assumig a null morpheme signifying the singular number of nouns in German is problematic. Now I´m wondering why. The issue came up during a discussion on whether ...
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1answer
113 views

Evidence proving lingustic perception of speech in brain?

Is there any evidence that speech is perceived linguistically, meaning is there evidence that shows that speech in the brain is perceived as phonemes, morphemes, and so on? I was thinking whether ...
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2answers
480 views

Why is recognition based on phonemes and not syllables or morphemes?

Why is recognition based on detecting individual phonemes, and not chunks such as morphemes or syllables?.. My question were in relation to human perception, and the existence of phonetic boundary, ...
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Are there dictionaries translating roots from one Indo-European language to another?

Are there dictionaries translating roots from one Indo-European language (family) to another? Such dictionaries would be helpful for translating calques like выставка, Ausstellung, and exhibition. ...
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0answers
58 views

Is there a name for the replaceable wildcard “morpheme”?

The very rare phenomenon I'm talking about is a part of a word that indicates that the word encompasses a number of hyponyms, which are arrived at by replacing that part. It is probably easier to ...
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2answers
130 views

Morphology - Detailed description

The adjective "happy" is a free morpheme. And at the same time, it is an adjective which is one of the lexical morphemes. So, can I say that "happy" is (a lexical free morpheme)? In the same way, can ...
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5answers
683 views

Can we conclude that morpheme is ALWAYS greater than syllable?

A morpheme is the most smallest meaningful unit of language. A syllable is the smallest piece of pronunciation that has a vowel in it. Definitions are taken from this link. I don't know why, but can ...
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1answer
286 views

About allomorphs of morphemes [closed]

Is it possible for an allomorph of a morpheme to have another allomorph that is a free form? Could you give an example?
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5answers
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Are all morphemes meaningful?

According to the notes I kept during a lecture on Morphology, morphemes are meaningful themselves and they can also differentiate meaning. Are all morphemes considered to be meaningful? For example {-...
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1answer
901 views

Are all complex words polymorphemic?

Complex words contain whether a bound and a free morpheme (eg unhappy) or two bound morphemes (eg intervene). In the first case (eg unhappy) the complex word is polymorphemic because it includes a ...
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1answer
243 views

verbal or adjectival suffix -ed in the word “excited”

is the suffix -ed verbal or adjectival in the sentence: I was excited about my new job. Would the answer be different if the sentence was: I was excited by my new job. Maybe by indicates that ...
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2answers
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Does adding the suffix -ly to a noun or an adjective provide morphological evidence for word class?

For example, adding -ly to quick to make quickly. Or adding -ly to gentleman to make gentlemanly.
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1answer
541 views

What is the morpheme that marks a question called?

When languages have a morpheme attached to the word that makes it a question, such as a suffix, is this called a question suffix, an interrogative, suffix, etc? I don't have much experience in ...
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0answers
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Does Lao (or Thai) have any “verbalizer” morphemes?

I know of at least two morphemes in lao which are nominalizers that can convert lexical verbs or adjectives into nouns: ການ and ຄວາມ. What I'm wondering is whether there are any counterparts which ...
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3answers
324 views

Are there any words, morphemes, or particles in any Chinese / Sinitic languages or dialects which don't have a set Hanzi character?

I am pretty sure that some of the spoken varieties of modern Sinitic languages include words, morphemes, and/or particles which don't have a set written form. Now I'm aware that some words or ...
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3answers
341 views

Across agglutinative languages are there tendencies for morphemes to occur in certain orders?

In agglutinative languages there are normally roots for nouns and/or verbs that can have multiple morphemes attached as affixes, following certain rules, to add information such as tense, aspect, mood,...
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0answers
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What are the advantages of using a morpheme-based dictionary in a speech recognition system?

What are the advantages of using a morphologically-based / lemma-based dictionary in a speech recognition system as opposed to a dictionary of 'Orthography' + 'transcription' or other types (which I ...
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2answers
1k views

morph/morpheme analyis

After analyzing many words morphologically I come across the following three words which I found hard to analyze: linguistic morphs: lingu/ist/ic --> 3 morphs; Would 'lingu' be then a bound ...
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0answers
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To what extent is aural language comprehension based on a post-processing model, and what are the factors involved?

It occurred to me that what we hear and interpret as speech is often an inarticulate garble of phonemes that native speakers process with lightning speed (usually) to come up with a clear and specific ...
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3answers
3k views

What is the function of “-ter” in words “laughter” and “daughter”?

Because there exists a word "laugh" but "*daugh", while the forms are alike to each other. I can't find the function of the morpheme "-ter" here, which is maybe irrelevant to the "-ter" in "enter" or ...
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4answers
903 views

Has the word ending *dition any independent meaning?

Does the term 'dition' has any meaning by itself or where does it derive from? It could be found for example in many English words, like edition, addition, expedition or extradition.