Questions tagged [morphemes]

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What is the function of "-ter" in words "laughter" and "daughter"?

The word "laugh" exists in English, but not "*daugh", even though both have a -ter word and their forms are similar. I can't find the function of the morpheme "-ter" here,...
archenoo's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
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Why is it problematic to assume a null morpheme signifying the singular number of nouns in German?

In a lecture, my professor said that assumig a null morpheme signifying the singular number of nouns in German is problematic. Now I´m wondering why. The issue came up during a discussion on whether ...
LittleD's user avatar
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7 votes
3 answers
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Across agglutinative languages are there tendencies for morphemes to occur in certain orders?

In agglutinative languages there are normally roots for nouns and/or verbs that can have multiple morphemes attached as affixes, following certain rules, to add information such as tense, aspect, mood,...
hippietrail's user avatar
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6 votes
5 answers
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Can we conclude that morpheme is ALWAYS greater than syllable?

A morpheme is the most smallest meaningful unit of language. A syllable is the smallest piece of pronunciation that has a vowel in it. Definitions are taken from this link. I don't know why, but can ...
Saeed Neamati's user avatar
6 votes
4 answers
5k views

Examples of words that are monomorphemic in English, but polymorphemic in other languages

I'm looking for words that are monomorphemic in English – preferably basic words describing things in nature such as star, water, tree, grass, etc. – but polymorphemic in other languages. It would be ...
Julian Gricksch's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
519 views

What is the difference among root, stem and base in English word-formation? Possible answer provided to check

Is the following text correct and updated?? It is based on Bauer (1983) but I don't know if this may have changed recently. Thanks in advance! A root is the primary lexical unit of a word which is not ...
Irene Domingo's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
4k views

The classification of morphemes

I have seen conflicting charts and models of morphemes. Here's how I understand it. Free morphemes do not require other morphemes to make sense. That means that all free morphemes are words. Content ...
A. Kvåle's user avatar
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4 votes
5 answers
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Are all morphemes meaningful?

According to the notes I kept during a lecture on Morphology, morphemes are meaningful themselves and they can also differentiate meaning. Are all morphemes considered to be meaningful? For example {-...
V.Lydia's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
441 views

Is a full stop a morpheme?

Is a full stop, represented by the graphical character '.', a morpheme? I haven't found a source either confirming or denying this, but the examples I've seen seem to indicate that the answer is no.
extremeaxe5's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
2k views

Has the word ending *dition any independent meaning?

Does the term 'dition' has any meaning by itself or where does it derive from? It could be found for example in many English words, like edition, addition, expedition or extradition.
feeela's user avatar
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How to split pronouns 'whom' and 'whose' into morphs?

Are the endings -m and -se inflectional suffixes?
Marijus Klp's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
2k views

What exactly a morpheme is

It says that morphemes include un-, -ed, -ness, and re-, in addition to words like town or chair or computer, words that can't be broken down. But computer comes from compute and -er. And compute ...
Lance's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
674 views

Why is recognition based on phonemes and not syllables or morphemes?

Why is recognition based on detecting individual phonemes, and not chunks such as morphemes or syllables?.. My question were in relation to human perception, and the existence of phonetic boundary, ...
Carlton Banks's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
75 views

Derivation of Morpheme for "Raising" in NACLO Problem

The Problem The Solution Partial Explanation chak appears in both (11) and (12), both of which are about catching. It doesn't appear anywhere else, so we can assume it is some form of "catching&...
MeltedStatementRecognizing's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
977 views

How many morphemes are in a contraction?

I'm a little bit confused about how to count morphemes when we talk about contractions such as "I'm" or "don't". I need to calculate the ratio of morphemes to words.
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
989 views

verbal or adjectival suffix -ed in the word "excited"

is the suffix -ed verbal or adjectival in the sentence: I was excited about my new job. Would the answer be different if the sentence was: I was excited by my new job. Maybe by indicates that ...
V.Lydia's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
1k views

Criteria for judging allomorphs and different morphemes?

I read in Crystal, D. (2008) that “Some morphemes...are realized by more than one morph according to their position in a word or sentence, such alternative morphs [are] called allomorphs” (p.313), and ...
ErinZhao's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
82 views

To what extent is aural language comprehension based on a post-processing model, and what are the factors involved?

It occurred to me that what we hear and interpret as speech is often an inarticulate garble of phonemes that native speakers process with lightning speed (usually) to come up with a clear and specific ...
Robusto's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
264 views

Are words such as sandwich,pumpkin and dictionary monomorphemic?

Can the above words be divided further or are they monomorphemic words?
Noora's user avatar
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2 answers
157 views

Examples of languages that lost auxiliary verbs [duplicate]

I've been looking around and haven't found any examples of languages that at one point in the past had auxiliary verbs but then later lost them. I know that both the Germanic and Romance languages ...
user3034777's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
180 views

A question regarding allomorphs

According to Wikipedia, two different word forms (allomorphs) can actually be different "faces" of one and the same word (morpheme). An example is the English indefinite articles a and an. ...
apprenant's user avatar
  • 127
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1 answer
902 views

What is the morpheme that marks a question called?

When languages have a morpheme attached to the word that makes it a question, such as a suffix, is this called a question suffix, an interrogative, suffix, etc? I don't have much experience in ...
Sue's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
2k views

Are all complex words polymorphemic?

Complex words contain whether a bound and a free morpheme (eg unhappy) or two bound morphemes (eg intervene). In the first case (eg unhappy) the complex word is polymorphemic because it includes a ...
V.Lydia's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
2k views

Why are pronouns considered grammatical (functional) morphemes?

Grammatical/functional morphemes are generally defined as morphemes that modify meaning, as opposed to lexical/content morphemes which supply a root meaning. In my intuition, a pronoun – although its ...
obskyr's user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
287 views

Expressing a phonological process happening only at morpheme boundary

If some phonological process (like gemination from here) happens only at morpheme boundary (say, only in the coda of a syllable when a certain suffix is added to the stem whose final syllable is that ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
67 views

Is there an online Esperanto word stem "diagrammer?"

I'm wondering if there is a site or resource that will take an Esperanto word and diagram the different components. For example, given "malsanulejo," the "diagrammer" would return something like: mal-...
Jeff Erickson's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
131 views

'London in' or 'in London'? 'ed-learn' or 'learned'?

In English, ‘in London’ and 'learned’ are grammatically correct. Grammatical elements or forms are divided into two categories: grammatical or functional words like prepositions or auxiliary verbs in ...
samhana's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
38 views

Confusion with Afrihili Word Machine Problem from NACLO

The Pretext The Problem I am referring to the third subproblem The Data The Confusion The solution states that it is possible to extrapolate from the data that -ma- is used to refer to occupations. ...
MeltedStatementRecognizing's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
44 views

Are there dictionaries translating roots from one Indo-European language to another?

Are there dictionaries translating roots from one Indo-European language (family) to another? Such dictionaries would be helpful for translating calques like выставка, Ausstellung, and exhibition. ...
Chill2Macht's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
88 views

Is there a name for the replaceable wildcard "morpheme"?

The very rare phenomenon I'm talking about is a part of a word that indicates that the word encompasses a number of hyponyms, which are arrived at by replacing that part. It is probably easier to ...
J. Siebeneichler's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
148 views

How is the word 'second' phonologically split into syllables?

The Cambridge dictionary says that the word 'second' is uttered as /ˈsek.ənd/, in which the first syllable is /sek/ and the second is /ənd/. My question is thus the following: why doesn't this word ...
thiagotps's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
136 views

Is longish an inflected form of long or a lexeme?

I am a bit confused on this, since "-ish" is a a derivational morpheme for forming adjectives meaning "somewhat Adjective". Based on my knowledge, a comparative is made by the suffix "-er" and not "-...
hixann's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
434 views

Are there any words, morphemes, or particles in any Chinese / Sinitic languages or dialects which don't have a set Hanzi character?

I am pretty sure that some of the spoken varieties of modern Sinitic languages include words, morphemes, and/or particles which don't have a set written form. Now I'm aware that some words or ...
hippietrail's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
1k views

morph/morpheme analyis

After analyzing many words morphologically I come across the following three words which I found hard to analyze: linguistic morphs: lingu/ist/ic --> 3 morphs; Would 'lingu' be then a bound ...
rena's user avatar
  • 181
1 vote
1 answer
124 views

Evidence proving lingustic perception of speech in brain?

Is there any evidence that speech is perceived linguistically, meaning is there evidence that shows that speech in the brain is perceived as phonemes, morphemes, and so on? I was thinking whether ...
Carlton Banks's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
159 views

Morphology - Detailed description

The adjective "happy" is a free morpheme. And at the same time, it is an adjective which is one of the lexical morphemes. So, can I say that "happy" is (a lexical free morpheme)? In the same way, can ...
Walid Jack's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
227 views

Is there an automatic way to divide French words into syllables/morphemes?

Context: I am trying to come up with a way to divide French words into syllables, phonemes, morphemes, or any other individually pronounceable/meaningful sub-unit in order to model word corruption in ...
0sharp's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
0 answers
229 views

Semantical and functional morphemes

I have this idea in my head that when it comes to morphemes, there are two divisions at the top: "semantical morphemes" and "functional morphemes". Semantical morphemes are those ...
A. Kvåle's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
107 views

Does Lao (or Thai) have any "verbalizer" morphemes?

I know of at least two morphemes in lao which are nominalizers that can convert lexical verbs or adjectives into nouns: ການ and ຄວາມ. What I'm wondering is whether there are any counterparts which ...
hippietrail's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
1k views

What are the advantages of using a morpheme-based dictionary in a speech recognition system?

What are the advantages of using a morphologically-based / lemma-based dictionary in a speech recognition system as opposed to a dictionary of 'Orthography' + 'transcription' or other types (which I ...
kearly's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
228 views

Question about the concept of free morpheme

Studying Understanding Morphology, by Haspelmath, couldn't find a reference to the concept of "free morpheme". Is that concept standard among linguists? What would be a better alternative, in any ...
F. Zer's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
187 views

Are the suffixes of such ordinal numbers as fir-st, seco-nd, thi-rd and six-th derivational or inflectional?

These suffixes do not change the part of speech, so are they inflectional endings?
Marijus Klp's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
3k views

Does adding the suffix -ly to a noun or an adjective provide morphological evidence for word class?

For example, adding -ly to quick to make quickly. Or adding -ly to gentleman to make gentlemanly.
Kimmy's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
107 views

Are adpositions lexical or grammatical morphemes?

In English, prepositions have something in common with most grammatical morphemes: they're a closed class. However, some phrasal prepositions in English contain lexical morphemes: "on top of," "on ...
James Grossmann's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
443 views

About allomorphs of morphemes [closed]

Is it possible for an allomorph of a morpheme to have another allomorph that is a free form? Could you give an example?
V.Lydia's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
73 views

What are the relationships between bound morpheme and affix?

Anderson's Essentials of Linguistics introduces bound morphemes in A morpheme is the smallest form that has meaning. Some morphemes are free: they can appear in isolation. (This means that some words ...
Tim's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
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Modern authoritive textbook for morpheme analyses

I have been reading several books dealing with morpheme/semanteme, etc...But some of them are a few decades old and don't deal exclusively with the subject in the scope of Lexicology. So I would like ...
bad_coder's user avatar
  • 121
-1 votes
1 answer
172 views

Does "tetrahedrization" make sense?

I am deciding on a spelling of "tessellation composed of tetrahedra" to use in my thesis. There are four choices I know of Tetrahedralization with 3,530 results on Google Scholar and 25,800 on ...
Dahn's user avatar
  • 107
-5 votes
1 answer
93 views

How to translate words like "the" to other languages?

So this question boils down to, how do you teach someone in Inuktitut (or elsewhere) about the word "the" (or "a")? How do you translate phrases like "the big red tree" ...
Lance's user avatar
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