Questions tagged [morphological-analysis]

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2
votes
1answer
84 views

Is _ing a derivational suffix in the noun “reading” (as in the event--e.g. a poetry reading)?

Clearly there is a difference between the gerund form of the verb "read" and the noun "reading." Is the word-formation process of the latter different in that its -ing suffix is derivational?
2
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2answers
100 views

Can I form a morphological condition like this?

I am pretty new to this site. I have a question about setting up a morphological condition. eg. In a language, we see a pattern that consonant-ending as well as ə-ending words are pluralized with a ...
2
votes
0answers
45 views

What’s the standard way to gloss a morpheme that provides subject, object and tense?

If there a Leipzig standard to gloss a suffix like “1st person subject, second person object, past tense” My best guess is 1.S.2.O.Past And then what if it’s first person exclusive 1.EXCL.S....
2
votes
1answer
53 views

Is there an online Esperanto word stem “diagrammer?”

I'm wondering if there is a site or resource that will take an Esperanto word and diagram the different components. For example, given "malsanulejo," the "diagrammer" would return something like: mal-...
6
votes
3answers
449 views

What prevents certain grammatical forms to be analysed as one word?

When analysing a language, when do we analyse certain morphemes as one word as opposed to multiple, or is this arbitrary? For instance, I could make the claim that (in certain cases) 'a/an' is a ...
7
votes
1answer
719 views

Why is it problematic to assume a null morpheme signifying the singular number of nouns in German?

In a lecture, my professor said that assumig a null morpheme signifying the singular number of nouns in German is problematic. Now I´m wondering why. The issue came up during a discussion on whether ...
1
vote
1answer
305 views

How to generalize over these morphological rules?

I've just started a linguistic course at university, we've just started Morphology this week. I am very new to the subject and I am looking for some guidance about how to approach a morphology ...
0
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2answers
2k views

Does adding the suffix -ly to a noun or an adjective provide morphological evidence for word class?

For example, adding -ly to quick to make quickly. Or adding -ly to gentleman to make gentlemanly.
4
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2answers
83 views

Help me unpack this Classical Greek word? [closed]

ἁλιπτοίητος Liddell and Scott seem somewhat uncertain how this links to other Greek words, though they affirm the reading as "driven by fear across the sea." My Greek is rusty, and I don't know that ...
0
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2answers
236 views

Is this nominal suffix more inflectional or derivational?

So, I'm working on this conlang as part of my work and the deliverable is a simple grammar. To facilitate reference, I've divided up the suffixes between inflectional and derivational forms. But of ...
3
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2answers
263 views

Word and/or syllable frequency data for Lao

I've returned my language focus to Lao now that my travels through Asia have finished and I'm back home. There are not as many or as high quality resources available for Lao as for many other ...
2
votes
2answers
489 views

Plural formation in Bulgarian

How could you analyze the formation of the plural below? Singular - Plural teatər - teatri - theater bobər - bobri - beaver pesen - pesni - song psalom - psalmi - psalm bancik - bancigi - ...
3
votes
2answers
267 views

To what extent is a language's morphology tied to orthography, and why do we not consider orthography when doing morphological analysis?

Linguistics classes seem to be mostly concerned with analyzing language in its spoken form. Written language is seen as almost "parasitic" to spoken language. A language's orthography generally gives ...
1
vote
1answer
332 views

How do directional morphemes work independant of relative positions of the speaker and listener?

This is from Wikipedia: An interesting aspect of Akatek grammar, which is also present in most other Q'anjobalan languages, is the use of directional morphemes, which appear as enclitics. These ...
1
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2answers
1k views

morph/morpheme analyis

After analyzing many words morphologically I come across the following three words which I found hard to analyze: linguistic morphs: lingu/ist/ic --> 3 morphs; Would 'lingu' be then a bound ...
5
votes
4answers
859 views

Which language has verb/noun compounding features?

Often languages have compounding phrases with the same Part Of Speech (POS) and it becomes a morphological analysis problem in Natural Language Processing (NLP). The most notorious being infinite ...
1
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2answers
207 views

Which features of Georgian verbs can cause an initial “ა” (a) to become an “ე” (e)?

Kartvelian languages such Georgian have a very complex agglutinative verb structure. Georgian is very well studied but there's not a lot of self-study books or online sites that go really in depth. I ...