Skip to main content

Questions tagged [morphological-analysis]

The tag has no usage guidance.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1 vote
0 answers
32 views

Georgian "suffixal nominal marker"

Let me conjugate აშენება asheneba "to build" as an example. In the present indicative: ვაშენებ v-a-shen-eb-Ø "I build" აშენებ Ø-a-shen-eb-Ø "you build" აშენებს Ø-a-shen-...
1 vote
0 answers
75 views

Does the morphological analysis of complex words acknowledge/allow multiple derivations?

I have been watching videos in Youtube concerning the morphological composition of complex words, e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQKJNBAbYqM. Phrase structure (as opposed to dependency structure)...
3 votes
0 answers
132 views

What do Georgian thematic suffixes even do, and where do they come from?

Georgian has two sets of verb affixes that don't really mark a specific tense or aspect themselves, but the combination of them narrows down which TAM-indicating conjugation you're looking at - the ...
3 votes
2 answers
1k views

How to split pronouns 'whom' and 'whose' into morphs?

Are the endings -m and -se inflectional suffixes?
2 votes
1 answer
102 views

What is morphological analysis of words to estimate their meaning called?

Is there a word for this? I'll use an example to show what I mean: Let's say you don't know what sepsis means, which is bacterial infection of blood. So, you start thinking. You break the word up into ...
3 votes
3 answers
154 views

Roots categorization

I'm computationally working on an agglutinative language, a morphological analyser. The thing is that roots can form verbs (not all) but some roots like lüg 'white' is classified as Adjective if it is ...
1 vote
2 answers
61 views

Terminology for this kind of affixes

I was solving an IOL sample exercise (which can be found here) about the Aymara language. I did it, it was kinda hard but I did it. One of the words in it was challwampiwa. The first part (challwa) ...
0 votes
1 answer
94 views

Is duck typing valid to identify parts of speech?

Let's say we're trying to identify a word or a phrase and on the surface it seems a bit strange and to not fit into an easily identified category/part of speech (POS). Is it valid to say "If it walks ...
-1 votes
1 answer
53 views

Has the notion of "semainophoric" structure been considered so far?

Semitic languages like Arabic use consonantic roots conveying meaning, like ktb which is related to writing. The vowels to be added to form a word vary and give a nuance to this general meaning. ...
2 votes
1 answer
510 views

Is _ing a derivational suffix in the noun "reading" (as in the event--e.g. a poetry reading)?

Clearly there is a difference between the gerund form of the verb "read" and the noun "reading." Is the word-formation process of the latter different in that its -ing suffix is derivational?
2 votes
2 answers
806 views

Plural formation in Bulgarian

How could you analyze the formation of the plural below? Singular - Plural teatər - teatri - theater bobər - bobri - beaver pesen - pesni - song psalom - psalmi - psalm bancik - bancigi - ...
3 votes
2 answers
131 views

Can I form a morphological condition like this?

I am pretty new to this site. I have a question about setting up a morphological condition. eg. In a language, we see a pattern that consonant-ending as well as ə-ending words are pluralized with a ...
2 votes
1 answer
67 views

Is there an online Esperanto word stem "diagrammer?"

I'm wondering if there is a site or resource that will take an Esperanto word and diagram the different components. For example, given "malsanulejo," the "diagrammer" would return something like: mal-...
2 votes
0 answers
172 views

What’s the standard way to gloss a morpheme that provides subject, object and tense?

If there a Leipzig standard to gloss a suffix like “1st person subject, second person object, past tense” My best guess is 1.S.2.O.Past And then what if it’s first person exclusive 1.EXCL.S....
7 votes
3 answers
483 views

What prevents certain grammatical forms to be analysed as one word?

When analysing a language, when do we analyse certain morphemes as one word as opposed to multiple, or is this arbitrary? For instance, I could make the claim that (in certain cases) 'a/an' is a ...
7 votes
1 answer
900 views

Why is it problematic to assume a null morpheme signifying the singular number of nouns in German?

In a lecture, my professor said that assumig a null morpheme signifying the singular number of nouns in German is problematic. Now I´m wondering why. The issue came up during a discussion on whether ...
5 votes
4 answers
1k views

Which language has verb/noun compounding features?

Often languages have compounding phrases with the same Part Of Speech (POS) and it becomes a morphological analysis problem in Natural Language Processing (NLP). The most notorious being infinite ...
1 vote
1 answer
712 views

How to generalize over these morphological rules?

I've just started a linguistic course at university, we've just started Morphology this week. I am very new to the subject and I am looking for some guidance about how to approach a morphology ...
0 votes
2 answers
3k views

Does adding the suffix -ly to a noun or an adjective provide morphological evidence for word class?

For example, adding -ly to quick to make quickly. Or adding -ly to gentleman to make gentlemanly.
0 votes
2 answers
330 views

Is this nominal suffix more inflectional or derivational?

So, I'm working on this conlang as part of my work and the deliverable is a simple grammar. To facilitate reference, I've divided up the suffixes between inflectional and derivational forms. But of ...
4 votes
2 answers
99 views

Help me unpack this Classical Greek word? [closed]

ἁλιπτοίητος Liddell and Scott seem somewhat uncertain how this links to other Greek words, though they affirm the reading as "driven by fear across the sea." My Greek is rusty, and I don't know that ...
1 vote
2 answers
1k views

morph/morpheme analyis

After analyzing many words morphologically I come across the following three words which I found hard to analyze: linguistic morphs: lingu/ist/ic --> 3 morphs; Would 'lingu' be then a bound ...
3 votes
2 answers
382 views

Word and/or syllable frequency data for Lao

I've returned my language focus to Lao now that my travels through Asia have finished and I'm back home. There are not as many or as high quality resources available for Lao as for many other ...
4 votes
2 answers
419 views

To what extent is a language's morphology tied to orthography, and why do we not consider orthography when doing morphological analysis?

Linguistics classes seem to be mostly concerned with analyzing language in its spoken form. Written language is seen as almost "parasitic" to spoken language. A language's orthography generally gives ...
1 vote
1 answer
530 views

How do directional morphemes work independant of relative positions of the speaker and listener?

This is from Wikipedia: An interesting aspect of Akatek grammar, which is also present in most other Q'anjobalan languages, is the use of directional morphemes, which appear as enclitics. These ...
1 vote
2 answers
366 views

Which features of Georgian verbs can cause an initial "ა" (a) to become an "ე" (e)?

Kartvelian languages such Georgian have a very complex agglutinative verb structure. Georgian is very well studied but there's not a lot of self-study books or online sites that go really in depth. I ...