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Questions tagged [morphological-typology]

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References to languages lacking morphology in scientific literature

Are there any references of natural languages lacking morphology in the scientific literature? I suppose there should be, given the topic's importance and the popular opinion on this, but so far all I'...
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25 views

How are nominal predicates expressed in active-stative languages?

Based on my reading, Active–Stative languages typically feature the core arguments of Agent (AGN) and Patient (PAT). While the precise rules differ by language, it seems to be that for intransitive ...
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1answer
199 views

Are there languages in which adverbs inflect?

Are there any languages in which adverbs (in the sense of verb modifiers) inflect to match the verb they modify?
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1answer
172 views

What are some of the most prefixing languages?

Turkish is commonly cited as an example of a language which is, with only one or two quirky exceptions, exclusively suffixing. Cross-linguistically, suffixing is much commoner than prefixing and I ...
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1answer
114 views

Metric For Morphological Richness Across Languages

Does a metric exist that quantifies morphological richness in languages? Either a numerical score, or at least a ranking of languages would suffice.
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3answers
1k views

How to distinguish a polysynthetic language from other languages? When is something a word?

For example, the probably most quoted sentence in a polysynthetic langauge (from Yupik): tuntussuqatarniksaitengqiggtuq: tuntu- ssur- qatar- ni- ksaite- ngqiggte- uq reindeer- hunt- FUT- ...
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1answer
270 views

Possible connection between PIE Ablaut and Semitic vowel alternation

Since I started to read about language typology and then got a hint about PIE ablaut system I have been wondering if there might be any prehistorical connection between these families at least ...
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1answer
100 views

TAM categories: Can they be predicted from their numbers (a language's TAM inventory size)?

To some extent, vowels can be predicted based on the size of the vowel inventory, so, for example, in a 3-vowel system, it will be /a i u/, whereas in a 4-vowel system, we will get /a i u ɛ/ or /a i u ...
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2answers
219 views

Is the idea of “simultaneity” in sign language as opposed to “linearity” in spoken language really tenable?

I have seen scholars claim that... "sign languages are simultaneous whereas spoken languages are linear". In my opinion, however, the notion of "linearity" vs. "simultaneity" is misleading at best....
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92 views

Distinguishing “Eskimo”/“Inuit” languages by the passive agent morpheme

In The Origin of Agent Markers by Enrique L. Palancar an attempt has been made to list morphemes used both 1.) as a case morpheme belonging to a noun and 2.) as a morpheme on such nouns that express ...
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What approaches exist to categorizing kinds of passive agent markers and what are their advantages?

For my thesis I would like to conduct a study on the cross-linguistic distribution of agent markers in passives. In English, this marker is usually realized by the preposition 'by', as in (including ...
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2answers
7k views

What is the distinction between agglutinative languages and polysynthetic ones?

My understanding of morphology is that a word is taken and many different words are glued to it. Is not this true for both agglutinative and polysynthetic languages? Or what is the finer level of ...
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1answer
342 views

How is “Writer/reader-responsible language” correlated with synthetic/analytic languages?

This blog post suggests a rather interesting concept of writer/reader -responsible languages. Basically, this quote expresses the idea: English is a writer-responsible language. That means it is ...
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1answer
201 views

What sort of morpheme is this suffix meaning ‘about'?

Some background: This is a conlang that I'm developing as part of my job. It's a difficult task, but I want to make it as realistic as possible. I have to make a detailed grammar so that other ...
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0answers
150 views

Which prefixing language has the most speakers?

Most if not all national or widely spoken languages with an inflecting or agglutinating typology do all of their inflecting at the end of the word. These are called "suffixing languages". This is ...
4
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2answers
1k views

Affix that makes nouns into verbs and verbs into nouns?

I have a friend studying a language from the pacific islands, and she found an affix that when added to a noun makes a verb and when added to a verb makes a noun. What would you call such a thing, and ...
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1answer
491 views

Citations for morpheme/word counts?

(Edited to provide context and clarify what I'm interested in) Context: I am reading a paper that involves comparing German, Dutch, and English. German is the outlier for the phenomena and measures ...
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1answer
2k views

How many morphological cases does Portuguese have?

In WALS (World Atlas of Language Structures), "Number of Cases" is listed for most languages. However, this information is absent for Portuguese. Does Portuguese have any morphological case marking? ...
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2answers
773 views

Where is Welsh on the analytic/synthetic spectrum?

I believe it's traditionally been held to be more on the synthetic side of the spectrum, but why? Are there any quantitative analyses to back this up?
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3answers
1k views

What are the alternate morphological typologies to isolating, agglutinative, fusional, polysyntehtic, etc.?

The above typology seems to also be called "Humboldt-Schleicherian". While reading this answer in the question "Is there really a difference between agglutinative and non-agglutinative languages when ...