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Questions tagged [names]

a word or set of words by which a person, language or thing is known, addressed, or referred to.

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Pronounce the last name Alipaz [on hold]

My family name is Alipaz, however I have always wondered how to pronounce it correctly. My family has always debated quite a bit on it. It is of Spanish origin and supposedly was shortened from ...
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1answer
84 views

What linguistic impact, if any, has the the Roman three name naming system left on modern Romance and European languages?

The ancient Romans had a three name system (tria nomina): praenomen, the birth/given name; the nomen, like a family name but marking the person as belonging to a specific gens; and the cognomen, of ...
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0answers
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Nicknames in Various Historical Cultures

There are a variety of ways to form casual address terms. Using family terms is common ('brother'), shortening/modifying a given name ('Teddy' from Theodore), or something based on the person's ...
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5answers
3k views

In romance languages, are there examples of male names that derive from female names?

In french, there are many female given names that are derived from male given names. Those names are often obtained by adding "ine", "ette", "e" or "a" at the end of the male name. Examples include ...
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1answer
84 views

Are names of dishes more prone to name change due to power / language shift?

I am wondering whether names of dishes are generally more prone to change when a power or language shift occurs in a society? Particularly, I am thinking of the Egyptian cuisine and the current ...
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1answer
94 views

Why is it that Babylonian king names do not match their Akkadian equivalent?

I am trying to figure out why it is that Babylonian (and Assyrian) king names do not match their Akkadian transcription. For example, in the one known inscription for Nabonassar, which is written in ...
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2answers
291 views

Julius Caesar original name spelling?

Was Julius Caesar originally spelled with and I before "J" was invented? Or was it spelled some other way? If so, how? I'm curious.
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1answer
68 views

Is Musa a Montenegrin Muslim female name?

I was checking family records and found out that a great grandfather married a Musa. I know that Musa is a male name but the records are kept in Turkish although the great grandparents were of Bosniak ...
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0answers
104 views

Similar diminutive name construction in Turkish and Armenian

In Armenian diminutive for personal names are formed by adding 'o' for some short part of the name (I'm intentionally not calling this short form "root" cause it's not necessarily a root), so some ...
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0answers
57 views

Where might the given name Xelefon originate?

I was recently reading some historical records wherein a lady was mentioned, Olga Malar (née Cuch), born in "Napodiwka," Poland, in 1922. She was said to be the daughter of Xelefon Cuch and Jewdokia ...
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2answers
121 views

Why do some languages have many names?

I understand that each language has one name in each language and that they are not necessarily the same. For example, German is Deutsch in German and Allemand in French. But I've just seen Sranan ...
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1answer
69 views

What is the hypernym of names, unique titles, and definite descriptions?

The name Elizabeth Alexandra Mary, the unique title The Queen of England, and the definite description the elder daughter of Cecilia Bowes Lyon all refer to the same unique entity. We might think of ...
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1answer
119 views

Use of “Ibn” in Arabic names [closed]

I've been given a script where the Persian scholar Ibn Rustah is referred to as "Ibn". As I understand it, "Ibn" is part of the patronymic nasab and shouldn't be used as if it were a first name. Am I ...
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3answers
563 views

Is the study of proper names really a branch of linguistics?

Is the fact proper names are somewhat fixed in language (often not translated and also do not tend to change even in light of a change in attributes from which it gained its name), mean that it is no ...
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1answer
75 views

Is the Indian female name “Sati” the same as the self-immolating Hindu goddess? [closed]

I heard about an Indian woman (possibly Hindu) with a given name of Sati the other day. Checking the internet, this site confirmed that Sati is an Indian female name. Is the name "Sati" related to ...
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1answer
120 views

Does this name's pronunciation match the spelling? [closed]

I want to use a unique name as my personal, yet it's spelling is very unclear to me. The pronunciation is "E m ai l" As in- E-end, M-me, AI-lie, L-live. Emphasized as word "agile". Is it correct to ...
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1answer
170 views

Open corpora of personal names

The only open corpus of personal names of which I am aware is the Names Corpus by Mark Kantrowitz and Bill Ross (which can also be found in the Python Natural Language Toolkit (NLTK)). It is much ...
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2answers
118 views

Kai as a Frisian diminutive of Gerhard, Nicolaas, Cornelius, or Gaius

On this website, it is mentioned that Kai might be considered as a Frisian diminutive of Gerhard, Nicolaas (Nicholas), Cornelius, or Gaius. I can see the relationship between Kai and Gaius (Caius, ...
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1answer
505 views

Do Azeri people actually use Ə instead of A in names?

I have two spellings of an Azeri name: Alakbar and Ələkbər. In official contexts (ID or passport), do both forms of the name appear or just the latter? Why do Azeris still transcribe their names if ...
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3answers
337 views

Why are most given names so common?

Is there a reason why it's so common for different people to share the same given name? This seems to be a normal pattern in most languages. Names like Anna, Mohammed, Wei along with their ...
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1answer
136 views

Meaning of “Elin”

Elin is supposed to mean "Woman of Intelligence" in Sanskrit see http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/0/Elin. However, I was not able to verify this independently in Sanskrit dictionaries on the web ...
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1answer
2k views

How do Indian short form of names work in the USA?

I noticed many Indians choose to abbreviate their names when they are in a foreign country because it's difficult for foreigners to pronounce them, especially if they are longer. So when an Indian ...
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2answers
567 views

How did the name for st Peter become to be rendered as “Peter” in English, and why is not rendered as “stone” or “rock”

As I understand it, in the original bible passage, Jesus says to Peter "And I tell you that you are Petros, and on this petra I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not overcome it" And ...
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1answer
94 views

Can a word have zero characters in it? [closed]

Is it possible for a word, especially a person's name, to have zero characters in it? No letters, no numbers, no punctuation, just totally empty? I'm aware of some people not having a surname, or not ...
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1answer
939 views

Why was the name תאומא transliterated as Θωμᾶς (Thomas) rather than Τωμᾶς (Tomas)?

Thomas derives from Aramaic תאומא (cognate with the Hebrew תאום). My understanding was that Aramaic, like Tiberian Hebrew, had the fricative [θ] as a conditioned allophone for the plosive [t], and ...
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1answer
411 views

Etymology of Greek Enualios

Enualios or Enyalius (Ἐνυάλιος) is, in Homer and other Greek authors, either an epithet of the war god Ares or else the name of a separate god, the son of Ares and brother or partner of Enyo (whose ...
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2answers
145 views

Why do these names from the Bible have these stress patterns?

In reading particularly the Old Testament, I think I note a pattern formed by many names such as: Israel, Abraham, Jerusalem, Solomon, Babylon, Zerubbabel, Lebanon, Capernaum, Zebulun, Galilee, ...
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5answers
6k views

Why does English not have a cognate of words like heter, in Swedish, or llama, in Spanish, etc?

This is something that I think is present in most languages. If I were to present my self in English, I might say: My name is DisplayName. Where as in other languages I can both say: Mitt namn ...
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2answers
473 views

Two questions about Sappho's name

The Greek poeter Ψάπφω/Ψάπφα beared an interesting name, probably not Greek. I have two questions, about the first and the last letter of her name : (1) what was the value of the initial Ψ ? This ...
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2answers
2k views

Why are Native American names translated?

Is there a particular reason that Native American names, such as Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, Black Hawk, or Red Cloud, are translated into English phrases? As far as I know, no other culture's names ...
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0answers
147 views

Phonological Differences Between Given Names and Surnames [closed]

I'm writing a CRF parser that splits a name string into components. For example, Bob Belcher => <GivenName>Bob</GivenName> <Surname>Belcher</Surname> Belcher, Bob => &...
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1answer
124 views

Name of the Armenian people/language

I once knew an Armenian girl from Yerevan and she said the Armenian people are the Hy (pronounced like "Hi, how are you") and their language is Hy-idan. However, the wikipedia writes the name of the ...
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1answer
118 views

What is the linguistics term for descriptive names?

I would like to read more about descriptive personal names, such as "Red Cloud", "His-Horse-is-Crazy", "Salmon Eater", "Twilight Sparkle", "Rainbow Dash", "One who yawns", "Sitting Bull", "One man ...
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2answers
311 views

Etymology of Agamemnon and Priam

What is the etymology of the names of the kings from the Iliad? Besides these two, I would be also interested in the etymology of the names of the other heroes from the book, such as Hector and Paris....
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1answer
1k views

Why is Mikołaj the Polish reflex of Nicholas?

The Polish name Mikołaj is held to correspond to the Nicholas family of given names, as evidenced by the Russified name of Mikołaj Kruszewski. As this is an odd sound change, my question is why? My ...
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0answers
69 views

Is there a term for names with the “X the Y” construction? [closed]

For example, "Ivan the Terrible" or "Conan the Barbarian".
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1answer
146 views

Using the alternatives for copyrighted zero derivation words (e.g. “LEGO”, “Xerox” [closed]

We have seen how copyright infringement goes into zero derivation English words such as a Xerox clone or He was Googling it or even A lego like construction. (e.g. http://agile.dzone.com/articles/real-...
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1answer
215 views

Difficulty in learning names of people in second language

The area I live in has a very large population of Chinese people. I also speak fluent Chinese as a second language (10+ years learning and also speak at home). For various reasons I regularly meet new ...
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1answer
2k views

Morphology of proper names

I'm wondering if there are any general morphological properties of proper names. If a word is used as a name, it will be constrained by whatever syntactic constraints that language uses from proper ...
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3answers
1k views

Why do Richard and Robert become Dick and Bob?

Is there a phonological reason for this change? I know there are names where, when clipped, there is /r/ in coda position. For example: Derek > Der Sarah > Sar Harold > Har So in non-rhotic ...
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2answers
470 views

Was there a Greek or Latin name spelled “Jesus” or similarly before the advent of Christianity?

Many of the originally Barbarian names in history were Christianized. Many Christian saints with Slavic/Germanic names were given similar-sounding Greek and Latin names. In this way "Kuzma" (...
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1answer
3k views

Why do we call some countries a different name than the people of that country?

For example, in English we say Germany, Japan, and China but they say Deutschland, Nihon, and Zhongguo respectively. If we change the names because they are difficult to say or spell outside of their ...
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1answer
250 views

Correct Alexamenos Graffito Translation

I am researching the "Alexamenos Graffito" from Rome and the various opinions of what the correct translation of the Greek inscription should be. I know some believe it is "Alexamenos worships (his) ...
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8answers
3k views

Are there any languages or cultures that have genderless given names?

In the U.S. where I live it is possible to be right almost all of the time when guessing the sex of a person from his or her given name: Ronald, George (Sand and Elliot notwithstanding), William, ...
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1answer
4k views

How to identify character names in a body of text?

I'm trying to research methods of identifying or pattern matching names of characters in a novel or a general body of text, but so far my search has been unsuccessful, since "character" refers to ...
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3answers
1k views

Gender-based name endings: Are they common?

For instance, if an English name ends in -a, it's likely female. But English has no grammatical gender, and there is no general requirement that nouns in -a refer to women. It seems like in English ...
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1answer
155 views

Are Ivar and Álvaro etymologically the same?

I have heard that the Spanish name Álvaro is of Germanic origin. So I began wondering where it might be preserved in the Germanic languages. After some thought I came up with the Scandinavian name ...
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11answers
3k views

Articles before the name of a person

In the question “La” or “le” before a person's name? on the French SE site, the asker refers to the phenomenon that in some rural/dialect settings the first name of a person is preceded by the ...
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4answers
427 views

Why was מֹשֶׁה‎ transliterated as [moʊzɨz]?

How did the name "מֹשֶׁה‎" come to be transliterated with a [z] at the end? The OED entry notes that "Moses" derives from Biblical Hebrew "Mōšeh" and that the earliest attestations with a strident ...