Questions tagged [nasals]

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2answers
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Is the schwa nasalized before a nasal?

I know that vowels are nasalized before a nasal in the same syllable in English. I am wondering if this would include the schwa [ə] as well? For example, would the schwa in "restriction" [rɪstrɪkʃən] ...
4
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3answers
1k views

Are nasals stop consonants?

Nasals: I must answer the question but I am not sure how to understand it... The question is: why nasals both can and cannot be treated as stop consonants? I thought that nasals cannot be stop ...
4
votes
1answer
267 views

What's the acoustic difference between laterals and nasals

I have a hard time distinguishing nasals and laterals on the spectrogram. They both seem to exhibit lower amplitude, and I think on average nasals have lower F1. Are there any sources on the acoustic ...
3
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1answer
272 views

Why are non-stop nasals so rare?

Almost every language has at least two nasal stops (usually /n/ and /m/), and a language that lacks any nasal stops is extremely rare. And yet, also very rare is any kind of nasal that isn't a stop, ...
2
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3answers
3k views

Anunasika(Chandrabindu) in Vowels (Sanskrit)

Someone said Anunasika is like trying to say something entirely in nasal voice. So let’s say I want to pronounce a vowel ‘U’kara with Chandrabindu on top of it. I know it’s should be completely a ...
2
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1answer
122 views

Should secondary articulation in front of the uvular nasal have a sonic effect?

I was performing some Catford-style "experiments" with nasal consonants, and found that slight opening of the mouth or rounding/unrounding of the lips has no particular sonic effect on, for example, [...
2
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2answers
121 views

What is the exact position of the tongue for [ n ] in these circumstances?

Hi I am an English learner, and I recently had this question about pronouncing n sound. I understand the standard way of pronouncing n sound is to put my tongue behind the top teeth, however, when I ...
2
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2answers
313 views

Are voiced stops in English articulated in the same manner as their nasal counterparts before the stop release?

I have a question regarding the initial part of stop consonants in English. Let's take /b/, the voiced bilabial stop consonant, as an example. When I produce this consonant, prior to the stop release,...
2
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0answers
187 views

Was Latin A Nasalized Language?

Thinking about it, most of the Romance languages I have heard nasalize vowels quite frequently and it seems consistent: that has me wondering, is there any evidence to show that Latin was a heavily-...
1
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1answer
216 views

Where the nasal-ness comes in

I understand the basics of what a nasal sound is. I understand that /m/ and /n/ are nasal sounds because you are letting air come out of your nose. But I don't quite get a few other things: What the "...
1
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2answers
168 views

Semi-nasalization of the preceding vowel

In this French Wikipedia article on the pronunciation of Occitan, semi-nasalization of the preceding vowel is mentioned. For example, from the table of consonants: -n final muet en général ([n] dans ...
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2answers
913 views

Core organs of speech

Do you think the core human 'organs' for speech/sound production can be reduced to the lips, tongue and throat? I realize there are elements like nasals and glottal stops but the other three seem to ...
1
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1answer
159 views

Do Nasal Consonants Require Nostrils?

As far as I can tell, some nasals don't seem to require nasal aspiration. For example, [m] and [n] seem to just involve oral occlusive voicing. I can plug my nose and still make such sounds. It surely ...
1
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3answers
650 views

How to transcribe a labial+glottal stop released as a bilabial nasal

I think English something is sometimes pronounced thus: [s] some vowel, arguendo [ə] a stop. This stop is pronounced by simultaneously closing the lips and glottis. So perhaps it'd be called a labio-...
1
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1answer
132 views

autosegmental representations of floating features like voice/nasal

While I think that I understand how tonal phenomena is meaningfully represented from an autosegmental perspective, I wonder about how other phenomena can be. I remember reading a while ago about so-...
1
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2answers
141 views

/o/ -> /u/ change in Persian xānum خانم ‘mistress’

Is it correct to describe /o/ -> /u/ change in خانم xānum as nasalisation under the influence of the following /m/? What does general phonetics say about it? One Persian teacher said /m/ has nothing ...
1
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0answers
154 views

When a vowel is nasalized does it effect on how open/close + front/back it would be?

I'm trying to generalize what environments a certain set of phonemes occur, but I'm not sure if nasalization would affect where the vowel would be on the IPA vowel chart. I think my analysis of the ...
1
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0answers
691 views

What is the nature of the (voiceless) aspirated "m" in Hmong?

Hmong is a dialect continuum spoken across several countries in Southeast Asia. One prominent characteristic is the "aspirated m" (IPA m̥ or mʰ) found in some varieties. This is the reason behind the ...
0
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2answers
123 views

Tenuis nasal consonants

We know that, for plosives, when the voice onset time is before the closure event, the consonant is voiced, like [b]; if about the same time, it is tenuis, like [p]; if after, it is aspirated, like [...
0
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1answer
68 views

When we breathe through the nose, do we normally make an unvoiced uvular nasal?

I was thinking about what sounds we make when we breathe through our nose. I realized that we make a sound that is very far back, farther than the velar nasal. Do we normally make this sound, and is ...
0
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1answer
122 views

Differences between /ᵐb/ (prenasalization) and /mb/

What's the difference between prenasalized voced plosive /ᵐb/ and just the sound /mb/, if any? I've watched this video where /ᵐbʷ/ is pronounced, and I'd pronounce /mbʷ/ in the same way.
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0answers
64 views

When are we not able to make regressive nasal assimilation in phonetics?

I remember my teacher saying something about when we can ellide the schwa and something about syllabic nasals ("often more" as an example of a case where we cannot do regressive nasal assimilation due ...