Questions tagged [noun-phrases]

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Where can I find a relatively comprehensive X-bar analysis of English noun and adjective phrases?

Could anyone guide me to where I might find a relatively comprehensive, or well representative, X-bar analysis of English noun phrases and adjective phrases? I'm looking for common things, for ...
ishtar's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
133 views

In X-bar theory, what is N' in the NP 'whichever candidate wins'?

He will support whichever candidate wins. In the NP hypothesis, whichever candidate wins functions as the object of the verb support, and has the noun candidate as its head, so it makes sense to say ...
JK2's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
676 views

What does 'overt NP' mean?

I just started studying syntax, and I am a little lost in terminology. Would someone please explain to me what does overt NP stand for?
future linguist's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
32 views

Do uncountabe (mass) nouns act as 'indefinite descriptions'?

I've always wondered what is the correct use of 'uncountable nouns', for example 'Water', we might see a use like this: 'There is water over here' This is different to a 'class' or 'category' name ...
Confused's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
140 views

Definite descriptions and 'concrete numbers' in language

'Concrete numbers' are a type of phrase consisting of a number and a unit expressed with a noun, such as 'two metres', 'three apples' etc. Historically called numerus numeratus Take '5 men', it does ...
Confused's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
65 views

How can I tell if a word like "multiple" is being used as an adjective or determiner?

A new dashboard design, including multiple buttons, ... Dictionaries I've looked in only list "multiple" as an adjective. It makes sense to me that in the above sentence, it could be ...
minseong's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
97 views

When is a noun an adjective in a noun phrase?

I am thinking of complex descriptive "noun phrases" (I think they are called): The hugely-oversized aircraft-carrier plane. The yellow-spotted night lizard. The intricate and overwhelmingly-...
Lance's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
39 views

Materialization of nouns by adjectives

I am not even an amateur in linguistics, especially semantics. I want to use this idea in computational linguistics that I am also new there. The idea is how to deal with nouns that become more ...
Mehdi Abbassi's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
233 views

Why "a liter of water" but not "a 100ºC of water"?

Imagine a volume of water, 100 ml in size, with a temperature of 100ºC. Interestingly, you can refer to the water as "100ml of water" but you cannot call it "100ºC of water". That ...
Raffi's user avatar
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0 answers
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Roles of noun phrases in passive transformations

They gave him a book. He was given a book. In the first sentence above, "They" is the subject, "him" is the indirect object, and "a book" is the direct object. In the ...
Michael Hardy's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
84 views

Noun phrases in dictionaries

Today's Oxford English Dictionary word-of-the-day ("ice master") reminded me of a question that's been on my mind for some time: What criteria do dictionary-makers use to decide whether a ...
Nathaniel Mishkin's user avatar
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2 answers
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NP or DP for "that book"

When referring to phrases such as "that book", would it be considered a DP or a NP? I think it should be considered as a DP but I am not sure how to prove it using our given data. Some data ...
junev's user avatar
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2 answers
220 views

Languages with overt determiners AND pronouns/proper nouns

I am currently performing a cross-linguistic investigation of determiner phrases, and I was wondering if there are languages out there where an overt determiner can occur with a pronoun or proper noun,...
JKodner's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
132 views

The term for the state of a noun

In linguistics, a case is how a noun declines with respect to its grammatical function within a given phrase, clause, or sentence. Is there a linguistics term to refer to the “state” of a noun within ...
blackened's user avatar
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1 answer
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Substantivized Adjectives and the NP vs. DP Debate

At least since the 80s linguists have debated whether simple phrases like the cake are NPs with determiners in the specifier position or DPs with NP complements. Substantivized adjectives seem to me ...
Alan T.'s user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
511 views

Accurate English terminology for "complément du nom" and for "complément/complemento" as a general term

I am looking at this kind of French sentences: Le directeur de la banque Un directeur de banque Le livre de l'élève Le livre de français Having done some research about English grammar terminology ...
Grammiferous's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
63 views

How could you summarise the noun phrase of a certain language?

What features of a noun phrase are appropriate to refer to when summarising a language and giving reference to that languages utilisation of noun phrases? If I were to ask you to tell me about the ...
Rustang's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
200 views

Constituency-based parse trees and the word 'both' in noun phrases

I ran into a problem when doing a parse tree recently. It appears to be the word 'both' in the following sentence that is causing the trouble: It is evident for both you and the listener Obviously '...
Zeneng's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
116 views

What is the term for the pronunciation change that occurs with overuse of a phrase or noun phrase?

I've noticed that when a phrase (particularly, a multi-word name) is used often, the way it's said changes slightly. For example, when talking about the television show "The Good Place", the way the ...
janizer's user avatar
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0 answers
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Name for adjectives modifying the verb within a noun rather than the noun itself (as in "illegal immigrant")

I'm interested in the phenomenon where people object to "illegal" as though it is inaccurate because the person implied by "immigrant" cannot be illegal in merely being a person. While moral and legal ...
Brett Zamir's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
132 views

Are there any languages that mark plural before the noun, while everything else comes after?

There's a lot of head-final languages where everything precedes the noun except for the number (Japanese is one example). But are there any that do the reverse? Is there a language where number ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
222 views

Find noun phrases using syntactic analysis from Google Cloud Language API

I'm using the Google Cloud Language API (GCL API) to do syntactic analysis of English sentences. In particular, I'd like to identify all noun phrases. I don't care how they are used (subject, object,...
minou's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
187 views

Has there been cross-linguistic work on differential adjective-noun order?

In recent years, a massive amount of attention in linguistics has been devoted to the variation within language varieties of grammatical structures caused by semantic and discourse-pragmatic factors, ...
WavesWashSands's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
183 views

What do you call what a noun phrase refers to?

In most dictionaries and grammars, 'noun phrase' is defined by the function it performs, i.e., a subject, an object or a predicative complement. But this definition is not quite helpful considering ...
JK2's user avatar
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11 votes
5 answers
2k views

Languages where articles occur to the right of nouns

Are there languages where articles appear—as independent words—on the right-hand side of the noun phrases they occur in - in other words after the head noun in the noun phrase?
Araucaria - him's user avatar
7 votes
3 answers
2k views

Adverbs as NP pre-modifiers

I would like to ask about the syntactic analysis of adverbs as what is called "peripheral noun modifiers" in The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, p436, which is illustrated in the following ...
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