Questions tagged [old-english]

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7
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140 views

Northumbrian pronunciation of ge-/gi- prefix and -g suffix

I'm working on a musical setting of Cædmon's Hymn, and I'd like to have the primary setting be in the Northumbrian dialect of its earliest written example (the 737 "Moore" Bede manuscript). I'm ...
5
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0answers
95 views

How did Old Norse influence Old English to lose genders and cases?

Wikipedia says that "Norse influence is ... considered to have stimulated and accelerated the morphological simplification found in Middle English, such as the loss of grammatical gender and ...
3
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0answers
175 views

Why did the Old English 'eo' diphthong disappear?

If I am not mistaken, the 'eo' diphthong was very common in Old English, and occurred in a lot of words, however this diphthong disappeared by the Modern English period, why was that? Notice that in ...
3
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0answers
106 views

Kaluza's law and Beowulf.64b

in short : (1) how shall I scan Beowulf.64b "herespēd ġyfen" ? (2) How shall I understand Seiichi Suzuki's remark about 64b : "[a verse whose] second lift fails to be occupied by a sequence of a ...
2
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0answers
62 views

What was the role of "compound" verbs in Middle English?

I was just reading a book where it is said that when perfect started to acquire modern meanings, "compound" verbs appeared. Here are some examples (I`m assuming with "compound" verbs on the right): ...
1
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0answers
86 views

How did wið shift to denote association rather than opposition?

Millar doesn't expound the semantic shift at all, but Wiktionary tries to. But wið is a functional morpheme, that at large change with less probability. So why did it shift "to denote association ...
1
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99 views

Why does OE endleofan have "e" at the beginning?

Why does OE endleofan "eleven" have "e" at the beginning? (not ā)? What is the name of this OE phonology process? ā > e?
1
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66 views

a-stem genitive singular in NW Germanic languages

This is a classic problem and I'm not sure I expect a good answer to it, but it's worth it anyway. The question is partly about what appears to be some specious reasoning around Verner's Law forms and ...
1
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0answers
102 views

Did Old English have a similar adverb phrase or interjection like "of course"?

I'm writing a story that heavily uses archaic or unusual English words, with a focus of non-Latin, non-French and non-Anglo-Norman derived words and how English might work without them. I found very ...
1
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0answers
47 views

Middle and Old English Corpora Distributable Under Open Source License

I'm working on an open source computational linguistics project, and I need Old and Middle English corpora that I can distribute along with the software. Most of the corpora that I've been able to ...
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65 views

Why does the OE form "byrht" appear?

Why does the OE form "byrht" appear? OE should have beorht (West Saxon) or berht (Anglian). Is it Kentish form or what? also byrc, fyht
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55 views

Are there any historical runic transcriptions that utilize two runes to represent a sound change? (particularly in the Anglo Saxon rune sets)

Anglo Saxon did not distinguish by voicing usually, particularly with the sounds /s~f~z~v/. After the adoptions of the Latin Alphabet letters "f" and "s" were doubled when representing a voiceless ...
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175 views

Translation of "Beowulf"

In the brief span of time I have studied this ancient poem, particularly verses 1829-30, I have read several translations. While observing each individual rendering of the text, it was evident to me ...