Questions tagged [parts-of-speech]

The traditional set of eight word classes: Noun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition, conjunction, pronoun, and interjection.

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5answers
2k views

What parts of speech / word classes do languages most frequently lack?

Among conlangers, AllNoun is a notable syntax because it only makes use one part of speech / word class, which is analagous to nouns. A natural language I've heard of (but I can't remember or find a ...
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1answer
101 views

How is the 'to' in English infinitive forms called formally?

If I have a construction using an infinitive form such as in: "I want to go" or "What is to be thought of that?" What is the formal name for the part of speech that 'to' represents? 'To' is part of ...
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How to extract Subject, Object, Verb through a parser

For my project, I need to extract Subject, Object and Verb from the sentence. I have read that, LFG F structure is what I need. I am using Stanford NLP package. I couldnt find out how to do that in ...
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1answer
284 views

Classification of verbs by meaning?

I'd like to ask whether someone has ever tried to classify verbs (and other parts of speech) in a relatively small number of semantic groups /not necessarily disjoint/ and if yes, what groups they ...
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197 views

Can one word be classified as two different word classes?

Over at German Language Stack Exchange, the question was asked what the structure of the sentence Ihr Antrag ist abgelehnt. is, and what the word abgelehnt can be classified as. Traditional German ...
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302 views

Do we have a taxonomy other than part of speech?

I'm trying to create an educational system, and I would like to have more taxonomies than a simple part of speech. For example, I would like to be able to categorize words into: Tree => object ...
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1answer
149 views

If two verbs are in a row, is the first always an Auxiliary? [closed]

Consider the sentence: He has gone. This is one of the example auxiliary verb sentences from: "Radford, A. English syntax: An introduction, Cambridge University Press, 2004" has is an auxiliary ...
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1answer
563 views

What's a good test to distinguish past participles from predicate adjectives?

Most past participles can act as predicate adjectives: "The island was inhabited." but there are some words that may look like both parts of speech, but can only be used in one way or the other: "...
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Are there some analyses or linguists with the view that Chinese does not have lexical word class?

I'm not a linguist but a language enthusiast and I read lots of stuff about all languages mostly on the internet in blogs but also in accessible books and sometimes attempt to read some things not ...
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1answer
376 views

Classification of adjuncts in preposition phrases

In the sentence "the mad cow jumped right over the moon", the adjunct 'right' modifies the preposition 'over' in the preposition phrase 'right over the moon'. As the adjunct 'mad' to 'cow' is an ...
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1answer
112 views

How many gaps should a sentence have to be solvable but not too easy?

At the moment I am coding an automatic cloze generator on Text on the following way: Use a summarizer to find relevant sentences in a text based on frequency Use Pos Tagging on the remaining ...
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2answers
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How do linguists determine whether a language has an indefinite article?

Given: For those languages which have it, the indefinite article mostly if not always is derived from the numeral for "one". Most languages have numbers but many lack articles. How do linguists ...
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1answer
361 views

NLP conversion between parts of speech and pertainyms?

I would like to write a program that can automatically group e.g. 'happiness', 'happily', 'happy' into 'happy': What do I need to read to get a handle on this subject? What is it called? What is the ...
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1answer
193 views

What part of speech is “city of”, “university of”, “county of”?

Is there a name for the phrases "city of", "university of", "county of", etc? As in, City of New York, University of Florida, County of Cork.
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Parts of speech in a language

I am starting studying linguistics independently. I have a few basic doubts. English has following types of words: nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verb, adverb, preposition, conjunction, interjection. ...
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1answer
902 views

Gold Part-Of-Speech tags

I've read this term in many papers in NLP: (Gold POS tags). what does it mean? Thanks.
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5answers
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What part of speech is 'found' in this sentence?

I have recently applied for an English teaching position in Brazil and had to take a test in which they asked: Choose the correct part of speech for 'FOUND' in the setence "A whale found dead on the ...
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2answers
662 views

Do all languages share the same set of parts of sentence? [closed]

I know, that there is a relation between part of sentence and part of speech, namely elements from parts of speech can be combined following certain rules in order to be used as a part of sentence ...
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1answer
104 views

Word commonly tagged as noun but use as verb

Given a sentence "Someone has to walk the shore and map the island, see what else there is". The "map" word is a verb, but it's commonly used as noun, i.e., in most of dictionaries, the first word ...
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1answer
107 views

Do affixes and clitics belong to an own part of speech, part of sentence or another category ?

Birds, flowers, children belong to the part of speech of nouns, to fish, to pick, to play to verbs, swift, smelly, nice to adjectives those are the easy ones, what about clitics and affixes and such ...
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1answer
203 views

Is pronoun a subset of nouns when referring to parts of speech?

To be frank, I am very unsure about this, but having two sets and not knowing how they relate, there are four possibilities so far: nouns and pronouns are own sets without any connection between them ...
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3answers
643 views

What parts of speech are the most, and least, susceptible to linguistic change? And why?

What parts of speech are the most susceptible, and the least susceptible, to linguistic change? And why? I would think that nouns are the most susceptible, and that closed word classes, such as ...
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3answers
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What is the word class of the first part of a partitive genitive?

I'm trying to determine the part of speech in the following example: German: Mario Götze ist einer der besten Fußballspieler der Welt. (partitive genitive) English: Mario Götze is one of the ...
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What really makes adverbs different from adjectives?

I just tried to answer a question that amounted to knowing whether adverbs can be inflected. Then, doing a bit of search for examples, I came up with the impression that, in many cases, I could not ...
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1answer
580 views

Mine, Yours, Ours, His, Hers, Its, and Don't Forget Theirs

What exactly are the Indo-European predicative mine/yours/ours/his/hers/its/theirs forms, in terms of word class and inflection? Would they be considered the genitive (or even the dative) case of ...
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1answer
177 views

How to determine if a word is a verb besides looking in a list of verbs?

I'm building a PoS tagger and I was wondering if there is a way to determine if a word is a verb other than looking in a list of verbs. What i'm doing is marking all words as nouns, then if it ends ...
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1answer
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What is the difference in word pairs like “scary” and “scared” [closed]

Take the word pairs "scary" and "scared", or "pleasing" and "pleased". The former adjectives give the impression of inspiring the particular emotion, and the latter adjectives are the emotion itself. ...
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How are mathematical operators like “plus” and “cos” analyzed?

Consider the mathematical statement 1 + 2 = 3 It is read in English as One plus two equals three. One plus two is equal to three. In English at least, equals is obviously an ordinary verb, ...
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404 views

Are there languages where adjectives are clearly neither noun-like nor verb-like?

Most language I have some knowledge of have adjectives with are either a) nominal in nature or b) verbal in nature. (apologies if this is not the best wording.) In German, Romanian, and Georgian, ...
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Adjectives/verbs being used as nouns: the trend grows?

"I want a job with a social connect" , using a verb connect for the noun connection. "It's a fail!" , using the verb fail instead of the noun failure. "Acme is a multinational corporate" , using the ...
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244 views

What part of speech is the French “à la mode”?

What is "à la mode" in French? I am thinking it must be an adjective but wondering how this might be represented in an arbre syntagmatique. I am new to linguistics and just trying to get a solid ...
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1answer
168 views

The word 'all' as an article, rather than an adjective?

The grammar descriptions of some languages seem to treat words like all and no, as in 'all giraffes are yellow' and 'no pigs have wings' simply as adjectives, because the words they determine are the ...
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Multilingual POS tagging set

As you know: Almost all languages have the lexical categories noun and verb, but beyond these there are significant variations in different languages. We want tag POS of some text of a lot of ...
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500 views

Tool for manually POS tagging texts

I'm interested if there is a text or set of texts where each word is correctly POS tagged. I know there are algorithms that can associate POS tags to the words, but there are always many of ...
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2answers
270 views

“Like” in English (and perhaps other languages)

How is English "like" — as in "you look like a monkey" — generally analyzed these days? I can think of two ways to go here. I'm tempted to call it either a preposition, or some sort of ...
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What is a determiner?

I asked a previous question related to this one about parts of speech. I need to figure out what a determiner (DT) is in Penn Treebank Tag Set. In the set examples found in the tag set, it appears ...
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1answer
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Turn Penn Treebank into simpler POS tags

I'm working on some code for an open source package to analyze dialogic classroom transcripts. I came across an interesting article that calculates a formality measure that I wanted to try out (LINK) ...
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2answers
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What word has the most valid meanings, across multiple different languages? (interlingual homographs) [closed]

What word is valid across the largest number of different languages, and as different part-of-speech? (The precise term is interlingual homographs/heteronyms/polysemes) Examples: 'rate' is both ...
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How to decrease CRF++ feature function set?

I have a problem with the CRF++ Package. CRF++ cannot handle large training parts-of-speech corpora (large tagset and large number of words). In fact, the number of feature functions automatically ...
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2answers
870 views

What is an “adjectival article”? Apparently Albanian “të” is one

Being in Albania I decided to sit down with a word frequency list of the language and look each up so I would know some of the common words I see around me. The second most common word in Albanian is ...
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Can the term “gerund” be linguistically defined?

The Wikipedia entry for gerund starts with a list that shows how the term is applied to various languages. And we can see that what the term actually means depends a lot on the specific language we ...
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4answers
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Can prepositional phrases with “of” ever be adjuncts to nouns, or only complements in English? If they can't be adjuncts, why?

This question came up while doing syntax homework. It seems to me that prepositional phrases with "of" can only ever be complements to nouns, not adjuncts. The basis for my conclusion was that, while ...
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1answer
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What diagnostics distinguish demonstratives from definite articles?

Historically, definite articles are often related to demonstratives. How might one characterize whether a word in a language is a definite article or a demonstrative?
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Are there languages which lack a full number system but which have an indefinite article?

Most languages have a fully developed concept of numbers but many do not, for instance most Australian Aboriginal languages lack numbers and counting beyond a few such as 1, 2, and 3. Many languages ...

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