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Questions tagged [phonetics]

The study of the production and perception of sounds or "phones".

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Whispering in languages heavily dependent on pitch or phonation distinctions

When whispering in English all (segmental) phonological distinctions can – as far as I am aware – still be made, which may be due to redundancy (or simply because voicing is optional). I even ...
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73 views

What type of stress does French have

So I know that there are on the one hand pitch-accent languages (like South-Slavic languages, Greek, Norwegian, etc.) where the accentuated syllable is indicated by a particular pitch contour/tone ...
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5answers
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Does a coherent sentence which is a cross language homophone exist?

Consider a basic example of the French word oui, and the English word we. Phonetically these words are pronounced identically (okay some French speakers may put emphasis on the oo sound in oui, but ...
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1answer
51 views

Is there a variation in the point of articulation for the alveolar tap depending on word?

I don't know if this is true, but it seems to me that the point of articulation of the tongue tip against the roof of the mouth for the alveolar tap varies depending on the kind of sound that precedes ...
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43 views

Rhotic gutturalization in French

While reading my tutor's paper I came across a term which I would like to understand better. Uvular trill [R] appears in certain French dialects. That sound often changes into a voiced uvular ...
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1answer
19 views

Interpreting formant intensity

I was wondering whether there is any practical way to tell whether differences in formant intensity are due to different harmonics in the source or different formants in the filter. Is there any data ...
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1answer
46 views

Formants - beyond F2

I have read that for front vowels, the cavity behind the lips (I think this must correspond to the space between the lips and the hump of the tongue) is F3, whereas for back vowels it is F2. In that ...
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0answers
40 views

Is there such a thing as an articulatory home base for a given language, and how could it be characterized?

I've been mulling over the idea that articulatory gestures should be looked as excursions from a home base that varies according to language and accent, and that defining sounds just in terms of the ...
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1answer
85 views

Does English have syllabic fricatives (allophonically)?

When speaking rapidly, it doesn't seem that I make a schwa at all when saying a phrase like, say, "the bus." It seems like I'm saying [ð̩.bʌs]. Is this a documented phenomenon?
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83 views

What might account for different numbers of formants in plots of male and female speakers pronouncing the same vowel?

I have been looking at a Thai vowel in Praat. I have several exponents from native speakers, though only one of them is male. The female plots all show four formants. The male plot shows five ...
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1answer
53 views

What is the maximum number of IPA diacritics that can be added on a vowel?

What would the symbol look like, and how would it sound like? E.g. a long rhotacized nasalized vowel with tone?
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0answers
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Which sub-dialect /accent of Spanish is the most removed from Northern Spain Spanish?

I imagine the answer to be something like Argentinian Spanish due to the differing double L sounds, or some dialects that pronounce R's as throat sounds (voiceless uvular fricative?) such as some ...
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1answer
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In the sound change [t] to [ð], what steps would normally take place in which order?

Say, the situation is intervocalic, for example: [ata] > [aða] The differences of the two sounds are whether the tongue touches the palate and voicing. So if I assume voicing happens first, the ...
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0answers
17 views

Does short throat or stronger constriction cause a higher F3 in a vowel spectrum and why?

What factors determine the throat length? is the throat length positively correlated with the individual's frequency (male 5000 and female 5500)? Stronger constriction here means that at the place of ...
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1answer
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Other languages like English whose orthography is “not quite” phonetic

Most languages it seems are pretty much phonetic. (I'm only focusing on alphabet languages, so not Chinese for example). From what I've seen, Spanish is phonetic, Cherokee too, Finnish, Inuktitut, and ...
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2answers
108 views

Given both a word and the corresponding IPA, how to match/map the letters together?

Given both the word and the corresponding IPA equivalent, is there any stable algorithm for mapping the letter of each word to the IPA letter? For example, given close-quote and IPA kloʊzkwoʊt -- I'd ...
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2answers
67 views

If any phonologies / languages make a distinction between voiced/voiceless nasals, approximants, vowels, trills, or flaps

So there are voiced/voiceless stops and fricatives in many languages, but I'm wondering if there are the same sort of voiced/voiceless distinctions for nasals / approximants / trills / flaps / ...
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1answer
55 views

How linguists determine the sounds a speaker is performing

So I see things like: Sharanawa has /ɸ/ instead of /β/, and Shanewana has a labiodental fricative /f/ instead of /ɸ/. where the table shows [β] as the symbol. That, along with other examples like ...
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0answers
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Pronunciation of Fermat in Gascon/Occitan

A math professor mentioned that the final segment of Fermat's name would probably have been pronounced [t] because of "where he was from." She didn't clarify further but I looked up where he's from ...
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2answers
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What factors can be involved and make a compensation when different heights don't make difference among vowels?

I found out the problem in my German recording. I knew I had to open my mouth a bit more when I pronounce an /e/ than in /i/, and I did so. But when I analyzed them in a spectrum, they got all ...
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3answers
108 views

non-aspirated voiceless stops versus their voiced counterparts before a vowel

Is there a real distinction in say, a spectrogram, between unaspirated voiceless stops and their voiced counterparts before a (voiced) vowel? For example, /ka/ and /ga/. Are they actually different ...
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1answer
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Automatic secondary articulator

I have this assignment to do and it has to with automatic and non automatic secondary articulators. This is my first time. I checked books at my disposals including Wikipedia, but none discussed ...
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3answers
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What does it mean to claim something about the phonemic or allophonic status of a speech sound?

Linguistics: An Introduction to Language and Communication (2017 7 ed). p. 551 Bottom. phone A speech sound. This term is generally used to avoid making any claim about the phonemic or allophonic ...
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1answer
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proper terms for tipper and dipper S articulation

I just learned for the first time from a WIRED video about movie accents (at 4:30) that American English has multiple possible places of articulation for the "S" sound. I was able to find terms for ...
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1answer
108 views

What makes certain sounds linguistically “rarer” than others?

Every sound is equally as capable of being performed by the human mouth, and I (correct me if I'm wrong) remember my psychology teacher telling me that infants go and say every sound babbling - even ...
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1answer
42 views

Are alveolar stops really alveolar stops?

I noted that to make the sound the sides of the tongue make an occlusion in the laterals, this would mean the point of greatest constriction isn't just in the alveolar ridge.
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Fricative Alveolar Trill?

I found an interesting sound myself while trying to speak some German. When I hear German people speak their language the r sound is either uvular or alveolar. While the uvular r seems more common I'd ...
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1answer
28 views

How can we get the precise articulation resulted from adding diacritics?

I am not sure about the articulation of the sounds with diacritics [sʰ sʲ lʲ] and so on, since [s] is originally aspired; [sʲ] could be taken as [ɕ] in some documents. Are there any books or texts ...
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1answer
121 views

Is Daniel Jones' cardinal vowel system auditorily or articulatorily based?

Two of my textbooks said it was the former, while one pointed it was both. No further details about the truthfulness of these affirmatives were given. I personally think is auditorily and ...
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1answer
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Extract time from frames in LPC objects

I want to take other acoustic measurements (voicing, F0, RMS, tilt) at the same time as the frames of my LPC coefficients. Is there a way to extract the exact times that Praat is using to find the LPC ...
0
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1answer
52 views

Phonetic mapping between English accents

Does anyone know if there is a resource which lists the mappings between phonemes in different English accents? e.g. a given phoneme in RP maps to this phoneme in Liverpool, that phoneme in Newcastle, ...
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1answer
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Example of a language with tones, stress, and umlauts all in one (or something more complex)

Wondering what the languages have the most bells and whistles added to latin characters. For example, pinyin has ǘ which has the umlaut and the acute accent (just 2 additions). But I'm wondering if ...
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1answer
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What is the articulatory nature of [lʲ] and how is it normally lenited world wide, especially compared to [l]?

[l] is lenited in some languages like English (dark L), and in Polish (Ł). How is [lʲ] developed further if it does?
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1answer
30 views

Why have we come up with symbols for secondary articulation?

I've just noted that [tja] and [tʲa] sound exactly the same. It seems that [ʲ] would only be relevant in classrooms when having isolated pronunciations such as [tʲ], [kʲ], [dʲ] due to the fact we don'...
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3answers
123 views

Are There Any Monophthong [o] Words in English?

Whenever I look up a transcription for a word containing [o], it's either an [oɪ] diphthong or an [oʊ] diphthong. Is it not possible to pronounce [o] without gliding through [ʊ] too? Is it possible, ...
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2answers
224 views

When should I use /ə/ or /ɪ/ and why does it seem like they're not used correctly?

So I'm trying to learn the vowel sounds of the IPA, and I'm looking at the words "temerity" and "moment" in AmE. What is especially confusing is that first word, where wiktionary lists the ...
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1answer
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In phonation vids the vocal cords don't close completely or very fast, but according to authors they're suposed to. Why this difference in data?

Suposed vibratory cycle (one open and one closure) of a normal adult male: 100Hz Video discrediting the statement: https://youtu.be/v9Wdf-RwLcs
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Why are vowels said to be segments produced with no obstruction whatsoever?

It's clear that in the production of many vowels air isn't free to go to every available space in the oral cavity once it leaves the pharynx. Our tongue even touches the molars in [i]. That's just an ...
2
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1answer
80 views

How these close sounds are distinguished in native language

This is not a comprehensive list but just a few snippets from languages that have a few consonants that sound pretty much the same to me. I wanted to ask how I can learn to hear the difference between ...
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3answers
2k views

Why vowels sound different from each other

This might be a basic question but I am confused about how mouth shapes for vowels, at a deeper level, are producing different sounds. Wanted to see if one could demonstrate with another instrument ...
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2answers
103 views

How many ways are there to produce alveolo-palatal fricatives?

My textbook mentions three: laminal prepalatal, dorso prepalatal and postalveolar palatalized. If we take each name strictly, they'll surely denote different gestures. I'm okay with this, what ...
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2answers
52 views

To phonate [ɹ], is there a picture for pressing tongue tip against the lower gum and raising tongue's blade to the mouth's roof?

Linguistics: An Introduction to Language and Communication (2017 7 ed). pp. 74-75. Do the sentences marked by my red and blue arrows refer to 2 different manners of articulation? To wit, the ...
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3answers
145 views

List of vowel and consonant sequences across languages

Wondering if there is any sort of list either across languages or for individual languages, either complete or partial, that list the sequences of vowels and/or consonants used in that language. If no ...
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2answers
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What is the story behind the pronunciation of Logic? [closed]

The English pronunciation seems a peculiar to me, /lɑdʒɪk/, compared to the Greek λόγος, /ló.ɡos/ root, Latin legere carries the hard "g" with only the first vowel sounding different. English pulls ...
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1answer
166 views

If we can say the following sounds when whispering

In learning about the IPA consonants, a big distinction is between voiced and unvoiced consonants. When whispering however, we use no voice (I think). Yet, I feel like I can still hear these voiced ...
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0answers
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German vowel charts with phonetic accuracy

German vowel charts used in the wikipedia article Standard German phonology do not locate vowels with great details. For example German [e] is a bit higher than the IPA [e] (something like what is ...
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2answers
90 views

Types of Sound Variations (Like Accents and Tones) in Languages

So in Spanish and other languages there are accents like: café tú And in Chinese there are tone shifts as in this graphic: The tones are accounted for in English / Romanization by adding accent ...
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1answer
66 views

Do animal sounds have linguistic symbols or classifications?

Wondering if animal sounds have any formal classification or linguistics symbols like the IPA. For example: Chicken sounds (pretty awesome, done by a human) Cat sounds (purr, like trilled t, or ...
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2answers
59 views

If there is a rolling `g`, or a few other sounds, found in any language

Like a rolling r, if there is a rolling g like gurgling in any language. There is a rolling h like ħ. Like ch or sh, if there is a psh or bjsh, like booj but shorter. Likewise, a gsh or gj sound.