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Questions tagged [phonetics]

The study of the production and perception of sounds or "phones".

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3 votes
2 answers
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Why do Koreans have trouble telling apart /p/ and /f/, when their Discrete Fourier Transforms look nothing alike?

I understand why Japanese have trouble telling apart /r/ and /l/: their Discrete Fourier Transform looks almost the same (the only difference being that /r/ has some element at around 2500 Hz that /l/ ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
71 views

Cot-Caught Merger in NYC and New Jersey?

I'm a bit confused with the cot-caught and father-bother merger, especially as they appear in the NYC / New Jersey area? I'm a native of the area and have lived there my whole life, yet I have the ...
Max Scialabba's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
109 views

Is the Alveolar Tap the Same as a Very Brief Alveolar Plosive?

Is the alveolar tap executed with the same tongue movement as in the alveolar plosive except that in the case of the alveolar tap, the tongue tip strikes and moves away from the alveolar ridge so ...
André's user avatar
  • 21
1 vote
0 answers
44 views

Does the Alveolar Tap Cause Complete Closure of the Vocal Tract and Total Obstruction of the Airstream for a Short Time?

When doing the alveolar tap, does the tongue tip cause complete occlusion in the vocal tract and total obstruction of the airflow for a split second? If so, then how long does the blockage of air last,...
Jane Melby's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
27 views

I'm looking for a praat script that measures the voiced portion of a consonant closure marked in a textgrid

Does anyone have or know of a praat script that can measure the voiced portion of segments that are marked on a textgrid in praat? Like, say I had a conversation and I had every /d/ spoken in that ...
HelplessLinguist's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
119 views

How commonly are [u] and cardinal close-mid [o] allophones?

I ask because I listened to the recordings of [o] here: https://www.internationalphoneticassociation.org/IPAcharts/inter_chart_2018/IPA_2018.html For me (being a speaker of Finnish) all but the first ...
Someone211's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
92 views

Lip rounding doesn't transform the close-mid back vowels into each other, so why is the only difference between their names roundedness?

I don't understand why ⟨o⟩ is called the "close-mid back rounded vowel" while ⟨ɤ⟩ is called the "close-mid back unrounded vowel" - they sound completely different and they feel ...
Xiang Yu's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

Is the physiology-to-sound function injective, and if so, why?

By injective, I mean that there are no inputs corresponding to the same output. I only recently learned that the range of sounds produced by human physiology has to do with different mouth positions ...
Julius Hamilton's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
35 views

Can anyone read a video spectrogram and understand it?

Is it known if there have been people that can visually digest a spectrogram of speech in time, as a video, and learn to read it in real time, like text? (Or vice versa, translating images to sounds ...
Julius Hamilton's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
38 views

Canonical flaps

Dear colleagues: I have a question about canonical flaps. The literature is not clear on whether a canonical flap has a burst or not. I have found in my data that many flaps do have a burst (sometimes ...
Reasearcher Pronunciation's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
15 views

Annotation of speech signal with Praat: criteria for setting vowel onset-offset?

I have a question for all those with experience in annotating acoustic (speech) data using Praat or similar software. Specifically, I'm referring to the annotation of vowels and the criteria used to ...
uniuser's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
117 views

Why don’t consonants have a definite pitch?

Is it because consonants are too fast or too slow that we perceive them as indefinite pitches?
Emotion's user avatar
  • 111
-3 votes
1 answer
131 views

What's this linguistic phenomenon in English speaking?

I was enjoying the relaxing vibes that the hotel provided. When Americans say the above sentence, do they sometimes say "vibes that" in a way that sounds like "vibesat"? Does it ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 883
1 vote
1 answer
126 views

What's the difference between 'voiceless' and 'unaspirated'?

It's an additional question to the following: Why is a voiced, voiceless unaspirated, and aspirated distinction so rare cross-linguistically? My understanding What distinguishes aspirated/...
sundowner's user avatar
  • 111
4 votes
1 answer
134 views

What makes linguolabial consonants rare?

Even though I don't speak a language with linguolabial consonants, it seems to me that these sounds are easy to produce and also auditorily quite distinct, e.g. the difference between bilabial or ...
Someone211's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
104 views

Did Cretan Greek have [s] as an allophone of /ts/ after a nasal?

Wikipedia cites Hinge (2001) as reporting the claim that Cretan Greek had [s] as an allophone of /ts/ after a nasal. I’m not a German speaker so I can’t verify this. The relevant section from the ...
Quinali Solaji's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
804 views

Spurious Fs' spawning

As advised, I am posting a separate question, but I still think it is a better fit for linguistics (because of phonetics and phonology); feel free to migrate to latin SE. Famagusta is supposed to be a ...
George Ntoulos's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
82 views

What precisely is the distinction between Finnish /p k/ and /b g/?

In Finnish /p k/ are formally voiceless, but in casual speech they can become fully voiced (Suomi et al), yet they are never mistaken for /b g/. What exactly is the distinction?
Someone211's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
42 views

Are laryngealization, low phasal tone and creaky voice all the same thing?

I read somewhere that creaky voice is produced by drawing the tongue root closer to the larynx. And also that the third tone in Mandarin Chinese is also regarded to as the low tone or creaky tone. So ...
Gabriel Marquetto's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
33 views

Are there any references for acoustic measurements of Finnish consonants?

I'd like to know details about the specific acoustic properties of Finnish consonants, as well as how these change in specific coarticulatory environments. It seems to be easier to find information ...
Someone211's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
137 views

What is the name of the "clicky" t sound used in some british accents in words like "little" and "mental"?

Emma Stone tries to replicate it here. It's not a glottal stop; the t is definitely being pronounced in the mouth and not the throat. It's almost exclusively used when a "t" sound is ...
keaek's user avatar
  • 23
1 vote
1 answer
73 views

What would an IPA narrow transcription be for Finnish /d/?

From Finnish Sound Structure (Suomi, Toivonen, Ylitalo): The Finnish /d/ is apical alveolar, and the duration of its occlusion is very short, about half of that of /t̪/, ceteris paribus, see e.g. ...
Someone211's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
66 views

Is there any way to numerically describe phonetic sounds?

I've been theorizing if it's possible to create an automatic transliteration program between two different languages that use two different writing systems. So, I was wondering if there are certain ...
Capnsockless's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
62 views

Which sounds, if any, induce vocal strain?

I use voice recognition software as a keyboard replacement. I recently replaced the word 'enter' with 'eek' to trigger an enter keystroke. The word 'eek' has much better recognition accuracy. Although,...
Moss Richardson's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
104 views

What's the nasal phoneme before the "n" in "didn't"?

I've noticed that, in informal American english, we don't pronounce the word "didn't" exactly as /ˈdɪd(ə)nt/. There's a nasal sound right before the "n" that sound a bit like the /...
The_Animator's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
185 views

Why does the French consonant "b" sound so different from the "b" in the IPA chart (with audio)?

Why does the French consonant "b" sound so different from the "b" in the IPA chart (with audio)? I have compared many IPA chart audios, and the "b" in all IPA charts I ...
Wilks's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
1 answer
153 views

Why is anekdota written with a "k" in Czech but a "g" in Polish (anegdota)?

So I decided to compare the languages Czech and Polish. The devolving of voiced consonants to voiceless consonants are pretty much the same. However, one of the differences were, words with [g] ...
Akshat Goswami's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
132 views

Is ʕ̞ equivalent to the semivowel articulation of ɑ?

Wikipedia claims that Ladefoged & Maddieson (1996) p. 323 states that ʕ̞ is equivalent to the semivowel articulation of ɑ. Is this true? If so, why? If not, what is the false premise behind this ...
Quinali Solaji's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
640 views

Do the qualities of a vowel determine its semivowel’s place of articulation?

[j] (the semivowel of [i]) is palatal. [w] (the semivowel of [u]) is labial–velar. [ɥ] (the semivowel of [y]) is labio-palatal. Does the position of the vowel in the mouth play a part in determining ...
Quinali Solaji's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
119 views

Vowel quality: tongue position vs formant frequencies

I stumbled upon the claim that vowel quality model based on tongue height and frontness has been known to be incorrect – and the so called openess and frontness are actually two formant frequencies. ...
Slavus's user avatar
  • 357
-1 votes
1 answer
130 views

About similarity of sounds in Swedish and Danish

In all sources I have found the symbol /ð/ is used for Danish 'd', indicating something between the English /ð/ and /l/ with the tongue moved a bit back, touching the teeth a bit. So, actually, I am ...
Denis D. Bavrin's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
40 views

What is the difference between double articulations and secondary articulators?

I need to know the examples that makes secondary articulators and double articulations different.
Tobi's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
151 views

How many beats is a syllable?

I’ve read some sources that say a syllable is “one beat” but I don’t understand that. Wouldn’t it depend on the tempo of the pulse. I.e, if a tempo is 60bpm can’t you fit different numbers of ...
Lecifer's user avatar
  • 111
5 votes
1 answer
274 views

What subdiscipline of linguistics studies the relationship between writing and pronunciation?

Most European languages use some variation of the Latin alphabet. However, while most of them seem to broadly agree on what sounds most of the individual letters represent (with some minor differences,...
Dragomok's user avatar
  • 153
2 votes
2 answers
298 views

Phonemes vs. Distinctive Feature Theories

I'm a high school student who will be going to college to study linguistics next fall. I'm already knowledgeable about some areas, but I'm currently trying to expand my knowledge in phonology. I have ...
Graham H.'s user avatar
  • 714
2 votes
3 answers
217 views

Is there any sound change that can result in /ɞ/?

I am making a conlang where one of the distinctive sounds is /ɞ/. It is a rare vowel sound, and I searched Index Diachronica but couldn't find a sound change that results in it. The sound also does ...
Neil Iyer's user avatar
  • 123
2 votes
1 answer
238 views

Is this diagram accurate for [ɾʲ]

I've been having trouble realizing the /ɾʲ/ sound in Irish, and I wanted to know if I am interpreting the IPA correctly. I find it very difficult to tap the alveolus with my tongue raised to the ...
Sriotchilism O'Zaic's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
117 views

How to analyze nasal vowels next to nasal consonants

Let's say a language uses two vowels /A/ and /B/ which differ only by one relevant phonological feature [+/- X] such that /A/ is [- X] and /B/ is [+ X]. Now let's say there's a consonant phoneme /C/ ...
Graham H.'s user avatar
  • 714
-2 votes
1 answer
91 views

Phonological rules

If I were to write a rule dictating that /l/ becomes [r] before a front vowel would it be: /l/ -> [r] / [V, +front], /l/ -> [r] / [+front] or /l/ -> [r] / V [+nasal]
Amy's user avatar
  • 19
4 votes
2 answers
142 views

Voice Onset Time, Onsets, Codas, and Pre- & Post-Aspiration

Whilst we're all familiar with voicing on an intuitive and/or phonological level, the actual acoustic phonetics are somewhat less intuitive to many of us. The main way of formalising this intuitive ...
Tristan's user avatar
  • 8,746
1 vote
1 answer
219 views

Determining the number of phonemes from set of phones

For this exercise, I'm to determine the number of phonemes from a set of phones and then write their allophonic rules for each phoneme phones: [b], [ɣ], [β], [l], [t], [d], [g] However, I think I'm ...
Amy's user avatar
  • 19
2 votes
1 answer
83 views

How exactly are vowel qualities plotted on a neat quadrilateral chart?

How exactly are vowel qualities of a particular speaker, or average qualities of the speakers of an accent, plotted on a neat quadrilateral chart like these (from the Wikipedia articles for Received ...
Vun-Hugh Vaw's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
74 views

Why are mid-open/open vowels considered [- tense]?

I found the following chart (which was taken from Donegan (1976)) on a book and something reminded me of a simple question I always had, but I never came across a definitive answer: why are some open ...
Ergative Man's user avatar
  • 1,436
-1 votes
1 answer
123 views

Was Katherine Hepburn's accent consistently, totally non-rhotic?

According to the data of Nancy Elliot's dissertation on rhoticity in American film actors' speech, Katherine Hepburn was totally non-rhotic speaker, but I found only two r-coloured sounds in her ...
Roman Sergeevich Sidorov's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
180 views

How can I get fast measuring of jitter and shimmer?

I want to be able to see fast computations of jitter and shimmer. Best would be on the fly but an online/software quick tool would be also good.
OMGsh's user avatar
  • 121
0 votes
1 answer
107 views

Etymological link between “govern” and “born”

So my question is two-fold. Specific and more general. I was doing some genealogy research and I was trying to read some Yiddish (I don’t understand Yiddish), and I thought a line said a certain ...
Daniel Elfenbein's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
236 views

Why is phonology part of a language, but writing isn't?

I very often see the pretense of something like "writing is not language" which I still don't quite understand. As I understand, writing is a representation of a language, but not the ...
NeonGooRoo's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
2k views

What is the difference between traditional and modern IPA?

I have recently come across this while researching the phonetic spelling for "love", and I have come across a website (the website) that had both traditional and modern IPA spellings (with ...
Beathan Mann's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
35 views

Synthesize tone contours?

Is there software that I can use to synthesize how a hypothetical tone contour would sound? I'm aware of "sound from formula" feature in Praat, but I'm unsure how to create the right formula ...
user42197's user avatar
  • 113
2 votes
1 answer
187 views

Allophones of dental fricatives (/θ/, /ð/) in English

I've noticed in my own speech (West Riding of Yorkshire, male, born in the '90s) two different ways I have of pronouncing phonemes /θ/ and /ð/: The tip of my tongue sits in the gap between my top and ...
mudri's user avatar
  • 191

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