Questions tagged [phonetics]

The study of the production and perception of sounds or "phones".

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1answer
36 views

English / French speech to IPA

Are there any open-sourced library / Deep Learning models that convert an audio clip of a word to its IPA representation? In this case, the audio is from a non-native speaker and the goal is to ...
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4answers
448 views

Are there any tonal languages with syllable-final consonants that are not unreleased, or even aspirated?

All the tonal languages I have some familiarity with, Mandarin, Thai, Lao, Vietnamese, and Cantonese either lack stop consonants in syllable-final position, or allow only "unreleased" stop ...
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1answer
93 views

Pre-fortis clipping of /n/

Pre-fortis clipping is usually defined as operating on vowels. See, for example, John Wells’s blog post on the subject. But at least in my idiolect (Northern English-influenced RP), in the environment ...
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43 views

Native Pronunciation of -rr- in the place name Wirral as voiced alveolar stop -d-

I was surprised to hear the Native Pronunciation of -rr- in the place name Wirral as voiced alveolar stop/tap -d- in this video as spoken by a native centenarian at the time point 0:47: Life Lessons ...
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1answer
105 views

Is there any articulatory difference between these two IPA symbols?

Is there an articulatory difference between the voiced palatal nasal [ɲ] sound and the nasalized voiced palatal approximant [j̃] sound? If there is a diference, what is it? I ask that because in ...
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1answer
30 views

What is the difference between a formant and resonant frequency?

From what I understand F1...F4 correspond to the 1st...4th resonant frequencies of speech. Why do we not just call them resonant frequencies? Or, in physics, why don't they call resonant frequencies ...
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0answers
54 views

Experiment to show that phonemes are not invariant: stimuli!

The fact that phonemes are not invariant is shown in many studies. The first one, so far as I know, is that of Liberman, Delattre and Cooper (1952) in their report on the identification of synthetic, ...
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1answer
81 views

Accents of Sung Language vs. those of Spoken Language

I'm a GenAmE speaker, but I've noticed that many BrE-speaking singers seem to sing in an accent that is almost indistinguishable from my own. I first noticed it with Ed Sheeran, who I didn't even know ...
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30 views

When enclosing a phonetical annotation, what are the differences between [] and //? [duplicate]

When enclosing a phonetical annotation, what are the differences between [] and //? Are they not completely equivalent?
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1answer
76 views

Octopuses and Non-phonetics

This is an odd question. I was thinking about octopuses and wondering about the nature of language. To my knowledge (and this isn't my field) all human language has a phonetic components. Are there ...
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1answer
27 views

What are the differences of word stress, lexical stress and metrical stress?

It is said lexical stress is word stress, but I don't understand why they named it differently.
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102 views

Why does IPA have only finitely many symbols? Isn't the human voice box capable of producing a continuous range of sounds?

There are two things I've noticed: Every language has only finitely many sounds in it IPA, which is a notation for representing all possible sounds in all possible languages, has only finitely many ...
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1answer
95 views

Which regularly used writing scripts commonly spoken are not alphabetic? [closed]

I believe Japanese and Chinese are logographic and the rest are simply alphabetic or abugida/abjad/alphabetic. Using Wikipedia as a reference it appears their definition of an alphabetic is not as ...
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1answer
127 views

Where does Google's pronunciation notation come from?

When you search for "X pronunciation" on Google, it shows the "Sounds like x·y·z" box with phonetic respelling. Does anyone know if this respelling system is based on a particular ...
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1answer
87 views

Is /f/ more sonorous than other fricatives?

Tashelhiyt permits any segment to act as a syllable nucleus, regardless of sonority. There's lots of theoretical analyses out there, but descriptively, Tashelhiyt consonant syllabification moves left ...
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1answer
68 views

Mathematics of Rhyme (perfect, slant)

I have recently been working on some programming frameworks incorporating audio analysis of the English language, particularly whether words "rhyme" or not (pure rhyme, slant rhyme, etc.) ...
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2answers
974 views

What is the difference between /ʎ/ and /l̠ʲ/?

As far as I can find the descriptions it appears that they're the same. Why would 2 different IPA characters used then?
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1answer
74 views

Is American pronunciation "optional" for Americans? [closed]

Stop consonants: b,p,g,t,d,k are pronounced very lightly or not at all, but this is optional. For instance, "wait"/weit|/ or /weit/, "stop"/st^p|/ or /st^p/ Variations in t ...
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1answer
49 views

Does an oral stop with simultaneous glottal stop look any different on the spectrogram than the oral stop would by itself?

I'm not always 100% confident in my judgment of whether or not a final oral stop has an accompanying glottal stop. I don't think this can be checked on the spectrogram but would be pleased to learn I'...
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84 views

Are there any phones that are produced with the tongue "cupped"?

The book "Experiencing Speech: A Skills Based, Panlingual Approach to Actor Training" sets out to describe all the possible movements of the articulators. One of these is "cupping" ...
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1answer
55 views

Is there a compendium for sound laws?

Sound laws such as the Canaanite shift, which is the proposed law that Proto-NW-Semitic *ā -> Proto-Canaanite ō, and the celebrated Grimm's Law. Is there a database that lists all transformations ...
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0answers
38 views

Are there generative theories of grammar with privative features outside of phonology?

By "generative grammar", I take the widest interpretation and do not mean "Chomsky's theory of syntax today", thus HPSG and LFG would be instances of GG(broad). Phonology has a ...
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26 views

How can I measure fricative voicing?

everyone! This questions regards Praat. I'm trying to find a way to measure the voicing property of word-final fricatives in L2 English. Learners (and often native speakers) often produce forms such ...
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22 views

Book recommendation on language acquisition of phonetics and phonology in American children?

I'm looking for answers to the following questions about language acquisition, as far as phonetics are concerned. I'm particularly interested in American English, though failing that any language ...
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1answer
1k views

What is "˥˩" in the IPA?

While reading the Wikipedia page on voiced bilabial trill, I came across a transcription in the occurrence section which looks like: [tʙ̩˥˩] The word is from Lizu language and means 'bean'. What is ...
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58 views

echo/doubling of consonants in sanskrit

I've notice that whenever people in india pronounce a sanskrit word where one syllable ends in a consonant and following syllable starts with a consonant, they tend to double up one of the consonant. ...
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1answer
44 views

How to differentiate between consonants and vowels on praat? [closed]

I am student of MA and i need your help to know about the praat software. i am stuck in my research in last section. If any one hear to know so i thoroughly and rigorously sorry to say and please help ...
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1answer
70 views

Why are phonemic transcriptions used in English pronunciation courses (instead of phonetic ones)?

I'm doing an English pronunciation course. There, I'm asked to pronounce, for example, the following: /i:/ In each case, I'm presented with articulatory and mouth position guidelines. However, if I ...
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1answer
37 views

Help PRAAT - My script to write duration of intervals as label of intervals

I am trying to write a script that extract the duration of intervals (in ms) which have a label (in this case "silent") from a single tier. There are several intervals labeled as "...
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1answer
70 views

questions regarding satemisation in sanskrit

I have some questions regarding satemisation in sanskrit. why there are still k in sanskrit if pie k tunred into sanskrit s ? It seems to me that pie *kʷ turned into k in sanskrit. is that right ? If ...
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2answers
134 views

In tonal languages, what is the tone relative to?

According to https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tone_language A tone language, or tonal language, is a language in which words can differ in tones (like pitches in music) in addition to consonants and ...
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1answer
44 views

Evidence for segmental phonology in the acoustic speech signal

What evidence for segmental phonology could be found in the acoustic speech signal? I think the parameters of acoustic speech signals include f0, amplitude, duration, wave form, etc., which are ...
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0answers
68 views

Is there a standard(-ish) definition of affricate aspiration/VOT?

Is the frication of an affricate considered part of its aspiration? Or does the aspiration start at the end of the frication? And does voice onset time (VOT) measure aspiration (as defined by the ...
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1answer
112 views

How does the phonetic definition of 'rhyme' relate to the poetic rhymes?

This book hints, without expounding, that the phonetic definition of rhyme relates to the poetry definition. Can someone please expound? For example, I still don't understand why "this type of ...
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1answer
63 views

How should I study additional texts?

This might sound a bit stupid. I just completed phonetics and phonology from Grady's "Contemporary Linguistics". I'm still in my schools and preparing to join bachelor of arts linguistics in ...
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2answers
169 views

What do these diagrams of vowels actually represent?

I've heard many times that spoken language is subjected to variations and we never make the exact same sound when we speak, even for the same word. If that's the case, how can you be so exact about ...
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14 views

Is it possible to extract a single word (may be in textgrid) from the textgrid file of a sentence through a code in praat?

Is it possible to extract a single word (may be in textgrid) from the textgrid file of a sentence through a code in praat? Suppose, from a long file I have put boundary and created one textgrid ...
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2answers
100 views

Differentiating phonemes in foreign languages for adults

I've heard that past a certain critical period for language acquisition, our brain loses some neural connections and thereby the ability to differentiate phonemes not occurring in our maternal ...
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1answer
182 views

Did h2 and h3 change the phonetic reality of an adjacent *e in PIE under any circumstances?

Did h2 and h3 change the phonetic reality of an adjacent *e in PIE under any circumstances? Can we treat *a and ā as allophones of *e in PIE?
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1answer
63 views

Feature correlates of the length and tenseness contrast in the low vowel /a/

My ultimate goal is to be able to predict from external factors whether and what kind of vowel quality correlates an /a–a:/ contrast might have in a language, and specifically to determine which on is ...
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2answers
3k views

How does the nonsense word "frabjous" conform to English phonotactics?

I am aware that this question is rather more complex than I am treating it, but I am looking for a few general rules (e.g. basic phonotactic constraints) that would lead to the conclusion that the ...
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1answer
94 views

Breaking a word down into its constituent phonemes [duplicate]

How should the nonsense word 'frabjous' be broken down into its constituent phonemes (e.g. the consonant blend -fr)? I would like to determine how this word is regular in English phonotactics.
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86 views

During second language acquisition, is it common for the speech organs to get tired by speaking the second language?

I am a non-native speaker of English (I'd rather not say what my native language is). I have noticed that my speech organs (tongue, lips, jaws and also the palate but I'm not so sure if it's the ...
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1answer
402 views

Why are voiceless plosives (p, t, k) unaspirated after /s/?

Take for example English voiceless plosives such as /p t k/ which are aspirated at the start of a stressed syllable and before a vowel as in kill, tar, pie: [kʰɪl] [tʰɑː(r)] [pʰaɪ] But after a ...
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1answer
48 views

What is the difference between these two nasalization constructs in Telugu, ఁ ం?

One is a half circle, one is a full circle, they both seem to nasalize the preceding vowel, but what is the difference in terms of IPA, or another way to describe it?
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71 views

Is the vocalic R and L pronounced the same in all Indian languages?

Wondering what exactly is meant by the vocalic R and L in Oriya, Telugu, Malayalam, Tamil, and other related Indian languages. In many of these languages on Wikipedia, you find the IPA transcription ...
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1answer
75 views

Diphthong detection technique -- reference?

I find it hard to directly detect which sounds a diphthong is composed of (or whether it even is a diphthong at all), but I found a little trick for it that seems to work. In song, one sometimes ...
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0answers
77 views

How diachronically stable is release type?

Are there examples of languages completely shifting from (vocalic) release of all coda stops to, say, nasal release? I imagine substrate effects could account for some of these cases (cf. unreleased ...
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1answer
51 views

About the behavior of the larynx and glottis in the production of consonants

Consider the following three consonant sounds in intervocalic positions: a dental click, an (aspirated) voiceless alveolar stop, and a palatal nasal. I'm trying to understand what happens with (1) ...
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1answer
78 views

Is /v/ cross-linguistically semi-voiced and powerless in devoicing preceding consonants in case of regressive assimilation? How to explain it?

In Danish, /v/ is semi-voiced, like a combination of [f] and [v], though /f/ does exist in Danish phonology. Russian features general regressive assimilation of voicing, but this rule doesn't apply ...

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