Questions tagged [phonetics]

The study of the production and perception of sounds or "phones".

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is this sound [ɫ]?

here. my native language (Georgian) is said to have velarized [ɫ] and plain [l] as the allophones of the /l/ phoneme, [ɫ] appears before back vowels /ɑ ɔ u/ and [l] appears before front vowels /i ɛ/. ...
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Is the laryngeal fricative the same as the glottal fricative /h/?

This page glottal fricative /h/ alternates between calling it a glottal fricative and a laryngeal fricative. Is the reason for it that laryngeally the only option to phonate is to exercise the glottis?...
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what kind of an /l/ sound is this?

here. some speakers of my native language use this /l/ sound instead of more common [ɫ~l] colloquially it is referred to as "soft l" and is transcribed as "ლь" which is a ...
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why pronunciations of cardinal vowel No.4 [a] are so different?

The cardinal vowel No.4 [a] pronounced by Daniel Jones and some other linguistics sounds more like /æ/ as in cat. but this cardinal vowel pronounced in the IPA website(by 4 speakers) sounds more like ...
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3 answers
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Can a phonemically aspirated consonant have an unaspirated allophone?

in My native language, Georgian there exist a set of phonemic aspirated consonants /pʰ tʰ kʰ/ which are said to be aspirated in all positions. though recently I noticed that when the aspirated ...
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the sound of "erre moscia" in Italian

In Italian we have the alveolar trill as a phoneme, but not all native speakers (me, for example) can do it: some people have what we call an "Erre Moscia" meaning we can't properly do the ...
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How is F0 determined?

I was reading Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology (Authors and page numbers will be added when I get my iPad back). And I am learning the concept of 'F0' for the first time. So according to this ...
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can a sibilant consonant like /s/ and /ʃ/ cause centralization of a following vowel?

As a native speaker of Georgian I recently noticed that in my idiolect the sibilants like /ʃ/ /s/ can make vowels /i/ and /ɑ/ sound more 'centralized', for example: /ʃiʃi/, "fear". and /...
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4 answers
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Is it possible for an ejective consonant to be realized as a non-ejective consonant allophonically?

In my native language, Georgian, there's a phoneme transcribed as /qʼ/ in IPA which is most of the time realized as some of a fricative or an affricate, like [χʼ] or [q͡χʼ]. Recently however, I ...
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The correct form for Baltics or Baltic [migrated]

I am trying to figure out the difference between Baltics and Baltic words should there be any. Imagine I was to call a company and want to use the Baltic/s word in it. Which would fit the most? Let's ...
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Pronunciation of г in Old Novgorodian

Pskov dialects are transitional between Belarusian and Russian, so this makes me think that <г> was pronounced as /ɣ/, but I have also read that Old Novgorodian has had an impact on Northern ...
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Are long vowel-less consonant clusters in Georgian actually vowel-less phonetically?

As some of you may already know, in Georgian language there exist a huge strings of consonant clusters which are said to be pronounced without an intervining vowel, like for example /brdɣvnis/ and /...
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Is a gesture a movement of a single articulator or of all articulators of a segment?

In researching the term '(articulatory) gesture', it seems to me that the meaning is something like 'movement of a single articulator for a single segment'. Ergo, e.g. a sound with secondary ...
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Name for motivation for synchronic reduction phenomena such as elision or fusion

Especially in spoken language, phenomena like elision or fusion occur fairly frequently, and often to an extreme degree. Take the German sentence 'Das ist ein Besen.', which I might (though not always)...
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Speed listening

I have just heard that there are people out there (mostly blind people) using screen readers at overspeed, achieving speech rates twice as high as usual, and even higher. What I want to know is: Are ...
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Please could someone decode this Albanian phonetics rule for me?

I was reading through a paper on Albanian stress as I am learning Albanian. The general rule, which the paper [available here: https://home.uni-leipzig.de/jtrommer/papers/alb.pdf] claimed functioned ...
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Can [ə] exist as an allophone of /ɑ/?

I'm asking this question because as a native speaker of Georgian I've noticed that in my speech the phoneme /ɑ/ sometimes sounds like a Schwa [ə], for example in the following word: /t͡ʃɑntʰɑ/ is ...
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is /t͡sʼ/ deaffricated to [sʼ] in these recordings?

my native language is Georgian which has the consonant cluster /st͡sʼ/ and I feel that I often use [sʼ] instead of /t͡sʼ/ in that cluster, for example: /st͡sʼɔɾi/ "exact, "precise", and ...
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4 votes
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What is the relationship between on-glide/off-glide of a phone and the transition period between articulation of phones?

In this question, the most highly voted answer mentions that Note, though, that on-glide and off-glide are also sometimes used to refer to the beginning and end of any sound, not necessarily a vowel, ...
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Correlation Between Voicing and Place of Articulation?

So after studying the phonologies of many languages, I've noticed the pattern that consonants produced towards the front of the mouth are more likely to be voiced, while those produced towards the ...
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2 answers
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Devoicing vs voiceless fricative

I was reading a session in the book Introducing Phonetics and Phonology (by Davenport and Hannahs, 4th ed.) about the articulatory variation in pronouncing the phoneme [w] when it follows voiceless ...
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Why the phonetic /ɔ/ is used in totally two different position?

Why the phonetic /ɔ/ is related to the phonetic /ɑ/ and the phonetic /oʊ/ at the same time even though they're totally different in pronunciation? /ɔ/&/ɑ/ /ɔ/ Awesome, autumn, Australia, Talk, ...
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can anyone help me identify this consonant?

in my native language of Georgian there's a phoneme transcribed as /v/ which has a wide range of allophones depending on the speaker. I for example have the following allophones: [ɸ] or [f] when next ...
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Is /ɑ/ of Standard Georgian realized as [ə]?

On page 263 of this PDF on Standard Georgian, it shows a narrow transcription of the North Wind and the Sun as narrated by a native speaker of the Georgian language. In that transcription, the ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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Does the IPA have a symbol to mark a letter that can be dropped in pronunciation?

I would like to mark a letter in a syllable with some kind of symbol that denotes that the letter can be dropped. Is there a symbol for that in the phonetic alphabet?
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2 answers
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Do sentences have primary and secondary stresses?

I know that stress can shift in an English phrase or sentence to emphasize the words that mean more specifically what the speaker wishes to express, however I'm talking about the general stress where ...
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4 votes
1 answer
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Difference between voiced and lenis consonants in English

What is difference between voiced and lenis consonants in English language.
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2 votes
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Is it more correct to use the minor and major foot groups in the IPA than commas and periods?

I transcribed some phrases from TV. This is casual American connected speech: As you can notice I'm using the | and || symbols instead of the commas and periods. Also, I do not show the question mark,...
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1 vote
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Is there a database that lists all ways of spelling IPA phonemes?

I'm looking for a list, database, table, etc. of different ways that IPA phonemes (like /f/) can be represented (e.g normally just f, but also the gh in cough).
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Variations of [aɪ] in English

I'm learning IPA and am surprised that some standard American English sounds which seem subtly different to me are all recorded as [aɪ]. Consider the phrase "I like the night", which I ...
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Why /əl/ in English sounds like [o]?

I am not a native English speaker. Recently i study some phonetics to improve my english pronunciation (and also french which i am currently studying). I noticed many words with phoneme /əl/ sound ...
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3 votes
1 answer
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What kind of stress is this?

I found the word "ice-free" is pronounced /ˈˌaɪsˈˌfri/ in Oxford English Dictionary, but what kind of stress is this? Should it be called 'there are two primary stresses and two secondary ...
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2 votes
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Why are voiced ejectives impossible?

Sounds made using the glottalic egressive airstream mechanism (one of the six main airstream mechanisms, and also of the four that are actually phonemic in natural human languages) are known as ...
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Do these letters belong to Kannada?

I am native Kannada speaker. But I've never came across these vowels: ಌ (U+0C8C) ೡ (U+0CE1) ೢ (U+0CE2) ೣ (U+0CE3) and these yogavahs: ೱ (U+0CF1) ೲ (U+0CF2) Unlike ಱ, ೞ I've never saw/heard above ...
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3 votes
2 answers
238 views

IPA symbol for a pause?

I started transcribing some phrases from TV and sometimes there are very short pauses between thoughts when longer phrases are pronounced, like the comma for instance. How can I represent the pauses ...
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3 votes
0 answers
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The dark l sound followed by a vowel sound during linking

the dark L in English is at the end of a word such as "girl", "pencil" or when it is followed by a consonant sound such as "child". I'm curious what is happening with the ...
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18 votes
4 answers
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Why was "zh" picked to represent /ʒ/, and where does it come from?

As a native French speakers I used to be puzzled by Zh being used for /ʒ/. At first because I didn't understand the need for it, since in French j is /ʒ/, and dj is /dʒ/. Then I understood why English ...
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6 votes
2 answers
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/ / vs [ ] - when to use which? [duplicate]

I'm a university student studying sound structure. It's a first-year course. No matter how many times it's explained to me in lectures, tutorials, help labs, or office hours -- I don't understand all ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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How to find a "burst quality" in a spectrogram?

What is the "burst quality" in a spectrogram? So for the example I provided from praat what would be the burst quality for the affricate shown below? Is it similar to a plosive?
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Is this a type of vowel reduction

in my native language there are some words written with the letter that represents the phoneme /i/ now in seemingly unstressed syllables I pronounce it like a schwa [ə] or maybe some other similar ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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What's going on when people hear my voiced stops as voiceless unaspirated stops?

I'm native speaker of Georgian, a language which has phonemic distinction between voiceless, 'voiced', and ejective consonants (according to study and Wikipedia) though when repeating Georgian voiced ...
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2 votes
2 answers
282 views

why do the plain voiceless stops sound like ejective stops?

Why do plain voiceless stops i.e [p t k] sound like ejective [pʼ tʼ kʼ]? am a native speaker of a language which has phonemic distinction between voiced, voiceless and aspirated stops and affricates (...
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1 vote
2 answers
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The Pronunciation of G in Old English

I couldn't find an answer to my question because Google Search went downhill these years. Why is g pronounced as y in a lot of Old English words? Is the reason native phonetics changes happen in a lot ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Shortcut to switch keyboards

I have the Linguist's Software IPA Unicode font, which requires a separate keyboard--internal, not external. I have Mac OS 11.5.1 and have created keyboard shortcuts within Word to switch from one ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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Does English have any words that are only unambiguous when spoken?

In Latin there are many words that are ambiguous when written, but unambiguous when spoken. For example, palus with a long A and short U means a stake. But palus with a short A and long U means a ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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What is the difference between a Diphthong and a heterosyllabic sequence of two vowels?

For example what is the difference between /aɪ/ and /a.ɪ/ or between /au̯/ and /a.u/? how they be distinguished from each other?
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1 answer
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Can anyone help me to resolve an issue relating to F0 and audio data?

I made a textgrid of the sentence "I quite like cheese a lot." and created three tiers and marked the sentence, word (cheese) and the nucleus of cheese to examine the f0. Then I used a ...
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I have a question regarding syllabic Sonorants

my native language supposedly has syllabic Sonorants and I'd like to know if they are actually syllabic or just a sequence of a short schwa+sonorant, here is me Pronouncing them in clusters. /kʼl̩dɛ/ ...
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1 vote
1 answer
132 views

Why does the Portuguese language sound similar to French language to me?

I thought Portuguese would sound very close to Spanish. However, to me, it sounds more like French? Why is that?
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1 vote
1 answer
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is this vowel sound [ɨ]?

the reason why I'm asking this question is because today I read a study which claimed that word-final vowels are "weakened" in my native language when pronounced in isolation, I tried ...
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