Questions tagged [phonetics]

The study of the production and perception of sounds or "phones".

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4
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3answers
329 views

Anguish Languish to English Language metric

Anguish Languish is a silly linguistics exercise to replace all words in a sentence with phonemically similar counterparts with no regards for semantics or meaning. The intent is that the original ...
2
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2answers
1k views

When is variation in the realisation of a phoneme allophonic variation?

The acoustic characteristics of the realisation of a given phoneme may vary depending on phonological context. For example, [v] may have a higher Zero Crossing Rate if it follows a consonant than if ...
6
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1answer
4k views

Was the change in spelling from “cw” to “qu” in English associated with any difference in pronunciation?

I always thought that "cw" in Old English represented /kw/, and the same for modern English "qu", and that the change from one to the other was purely orthographic, since the "qu" digraph was more ...
2
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2answers
160 views

Evidence of connections between f0 and a physiological parameter?

I have the impression that physiological parameters like e.g. the size of neck will alter their f0. It's just an impression but it seems to hold - I can usually guess someone's neck size over the ...
6
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1answer
816 views

IPA Listening Training

Are there any programs that will play a sound and allow the user to choose which sound was played? The options would need to be IPA or some other descriptive method (e.g., voiceless alveolar stop). ...
4
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1answer
266 views

Languages showing affricate-to-plosive fortition (especially diachronically)

It is well known that consonant lenition or weakening tends to be far more common cross-linguistically than the opposite process called fortition or strengthening. Now, some languages have been ...
4
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2answers
598 views

Should the voiced /t/ in the word “ninety” in General American English be considered a tap or a plosive?

[Please note that in the end this is not essentially a question about English!] Intervocalic /t/ in Gen Am English may be realised as a voiced alveolar tap, [ɾ]. In words like entertain or ninety ...
2
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1answer
1k views

Why are vocal cord vibrations quasi periodic and not periodic?

I read* that one reason that f0 varies over time owes to the quasi-periodic nature of vocal chord vibrations. But what does f0 variation over time have to do with the quasi-periodicity of the signal?...
4
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4answers
339 views

Forced aligner in Spanish? (Similar to P2FA)

I am looking for a forced aligner in Spanish. Something similar to P2FA for American English. I want to force align simple sentences in Mexican Spanish for a project. Does anyone know one?
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2answers
233 views

Tackling cross-linguistic vowel markedness system[at]ically: features or what?

I have been trying to find alternative ways of representing vowel phonemes for cross-linguistic comparisons in a unified, systematic way that would also reveal their relative (un)markedness. At the ...
2
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0answers
2k views

How to understand the difference between “Strong” & “Weak” Hypotheses in the case of Bolinger/Lieberman's views of Intonation?

1. Non-Whorfian contexts and missing Czech equivalents To begin with, I am not sure if this is the right place to ask a question that may just as well pertain to scientific terminology in general. ...
1
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1answer
140 views

Why does my P2FA skip every word?

I have a .wav file and a txt file that I am trying to use with the P2FA aligner. For some reason, it skips every word. I even tried running it with just two words: "the robotics". My text file is this:...
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0answers
44 views

Can someone tell me the differences between the vowel system in Canadian English and the one in General American?

I am interested in knowing what are the vowels found in Canadian English, more particularly in Toronto and Montreal. I know that the low back merger occurred where both /ɔ/ and /ɒ/ merged into /ɑ/ in ...
0
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1answer
287 views

How to represent acronyms using IPA?

As we all know in IPA isn’t used capital letters. There is also the 2nd option for representation acronyms which is to use dots, but in IPA dots is used to represent syllables. And therefore I'd like ...
4
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2answers
1k views

For each IPA phone, are there animations or videos that depict the vocal tract during articulation?

(TL;DR) For each IPA phone, are there animations, ams, pictures or videos that depict exactly and precisely the location of your articulators (eg: your tongue), needed to articulate that letter? ...
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0answers
168 views

Schwa syncope in “hundred”

My girlfriend noticed that I say when I pronounce a word like 'hundred' it sounds like I'm deleting the schwa sound in the final syllable and pronouncing the word mroe like, "hundrd". Does this fall ...
5
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2answers
780 views

Algorithm for Separating Consonant and Vowel Waveforms from Speech Signal

Is anyone aware of a software package or general algorithm that allows the separation of consonant and vowel waveforms from a continuous speech signal? I've tried to implement the technique "Harmonic/...
6
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1answer
685 views

Confused about vowel diagram (Vowel chart)—Can you clarify and explain how to read it?

Ok, here is the English vowel chart: I'm really confused, what do "front" "central", "back", "close(high)", "close-mid", "open-mid", "open (low)" mean? Ok, Here is what I understood, please correct ...
9
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2answers
7k views

Confused about vowel diagram (Vowel chart)! Can you clarify & explain how to read it?

Ok, here is the English vowel chart: I'm really confused, what do "front" "central", "back", "close(high)", "close-mid", "open-mid", "open (low)" mean? Ok, Here is what I understood, please correct ...
7
votes
1answer
2k views

Select a portion of a sound in Praat

In Praat, I want to select a portion of the sound, extract it, and save it separately from the original file. This part of the sound is always between 0.108 s and 0.112 s because it is from pure ...
4
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1answer
1k views

Palatalised allophones of /k/ and /g/ as a cross-linguistic phenomenon

As a native speaker of Russian, where [k]/[kʲ] and [g]/[gʲ] are phonemically distinct, I've always been intrigued by the fact that several languages that don't have that distinction, and are in fact ...
2
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1answer
54 views

What statistical methods are appropriate to comparing e.g. VOT across different groups?

As part of forensic linguistics practice, I must assess the relative age of multiple individuals based only voice. One crucial variable is VOT, which is known to decrease with age. So, let's say ...
3
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0answers
268 views

Specifics about the impact of natural gender on pronunciation?

What is the difference in pronunciation between women and men when speaking a language, as opposed to the difference in the voice of men and women? The context for the question arises from my looking ...
1
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1answer
445 views

What do harmonic-harmonic and harmonic-noise ratios have to do with voice pathology?

I was reading about spectral techniques to detect pathological phonation and came across the plan to establish relations between harmonic-harmonic and harmonic-noise ratios in for certain kinds of ...
0
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4answers
123 views

What's a good technique to understand the differences between the time and frequency domains?

I understand that phonetic analysis can be performed in various domains, among which: time, frequency, cepstral, and spectral. In the time domain, one studies e.g. Rate, energy, and duration. In the ...
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1answer
49 views

How do you learn what an old word might have imitated?

psyche (n.)    1640s, "animating spirit," from Latin psyche, from Greek psykhe "the soul, mind, spirit; breath; life, one's life, the invisible animating principle or entity which occupies and ...
2
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0answers
264 views

Confusion matrix for consonant clusters in English?

I was wondering if anybody knew of a confusion matrix for consonant clusters in the English language. I've seen CV, VC, and CVC phoneme/syllable confusion matrices, but never any with any sort of ...
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1answer
123 views

Making a balanced word list systematically using COCA and CMUdict

I am trying to find words in English that mirror the conditioning environments for spirantization of /b, d, g/ in Spanish. I am balancing for proceeding phone, lexical stress, word-internal vs. word-...
7
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3answers
307 views

Are there any words that have merged in pronunciation and spelling and then separated again?

Are there any words that started off different, merged in pronunciation and spelling at some point and then separated again? E.g. Two hypothetical words in Old English OX and OY are neither ...
0
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1answer
175 views

What is the protocol to determine sample size in phonetic research?

I am doing a simple graduate-student research project with a colleague in the CompSci Department. We want to develop a program that automatically distinguishes a man's voice from a woman's. We ...
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2answers
641 views

Is there a comprehensive list of all (or many) phonological rules (specifically allophonic) of the English language available anywhere online?

It would be very helpful to have for a programming project I'm working on involving grapheme-to-phoneme translation. I've been able to find many rules for phonemes but not too many for allophones.
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1answer
39 views

What are the most distinctive differences in the glottal wave between modal vs breathy phonation?

I understan that with modal phonation the glottal wave has a triangular shape, whereas with breathy voice, the source wave is closer to a sine wave. This means that the higher harmonics are more ...
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0answers
139 views

Is diphthongising [ʌ] as [ʌɪ] novel or an accent feature?

I have noticed some speakers diphthongising [ʌ] as [ʌɪ]. For example, in Bea Miller’s Young Blood, she pronounces “young blood” as [jʌɪŋ blʌɪd] and “us” as [ʌɪs]. Has this been documented elsewhere? ...
0
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1answer
45 views

Why are the higher harmonics less prominent in a spectrum of modal (as opposed to breathy) phonation?

I'm trying to learn more about breathiness. I understand that the cepstral peak is less prominent in the cepstrum of breathy phonation than plain ol' modal phonation -- but I'm not sure why this may ...
2
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2answers
259 views

Word reduction and American T before consonant

when I pronounce the phrase "It was good" in a context like this one: Person A: How was your day? Person B: It was good. I think that "was" is reduced to wəz (with a schwa sound). The only word ...
0
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1answer
98 views

Does word TA comes from historically, or a psychically to many languages on earth?

Does word TA comes from historically, or a psychically to many languages on earth? Ta, sumerian -root Ta, english -thank Ta, mongolian -grateful and respectful calling of "you" etc
2
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1answer
5k views

Word stress in English

Though English stress is free there are certain factors or tendencies that determine the place and different degrees of word stress. Vassiliev describes them as follows: Recessive tendency is when ...
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0answers
353 views

Modifications of consonants

Could you help me to figure out one thing? My task is to comment on the modifications of consonants by the neighbouring sounds(assimilation,ellision). But there are some words in the task where I don'...
5
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2answers
616 views

Phonology vs phonetics : /ʁɔz/ vs [ʁoz]

It's written on French Wikipedia that the noun “rose” is represented in phonology by /ʁɔz/ whereas Wiktionary is claiming that it should be /ʁoz/. In both case, the associated representation in common ...
13
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3answers
1k views

What's the evidence for and against isochrony?

The question What evidence is currently known that favors or disfavors the hypothesis that a regular beat of some kind—that is, an “isochrony”—plays some important role in languages? I've run across ...
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1answer
202 views

Why is English word accent traditionally defined as dynamic?

Coud anyone explain why is English word accent traditionally defined as dynamic? Due to some of it's features,history?
7
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1answer
287 views

Indistinguishability of [f] and [s] on phone - citation?

I have long felt that [f] and [s] are hard to tell apart on the phone, especially when spelling out words letter by letter. As a non linguist (but audio engineer) it seems to me that the frequencies ...
1
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1answer
316 views

Consonants in the same tongue position

the phrase: "Sit down" phonetically looks like [sɪt daʊn]. The "t" and "d" are in the same tongue position. Can we drop the "t" in the first word in this situation in fast/casual speech? like this: [...
0
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1answer
167 views

stress of function words in English

Generally speaking, what are conditions under which function words in English are to be stressed. I am working on weak/strong/contracted forms in English and the textbook states that WFs are to be ...
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2answers
628 views

Glide between the words “be” and “okay”

the phrase "It's gonna be okay" phonetically looks like: [ɪts gʌnə bɪ oʊkeɪ] There should be a glide (y) or (w) between the words "be" and "okay": ɪts gʌnə bɪ(y)oʊkeɪ, or ɪts gʌnə bɪ(w)oʊkeɪ I'm not ...
3
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3answers
1k views

What are the stages of child speech and language development and why?

What are the distinct stages, landmarks or milestones in language acquisition in regard to phonetic development? What is the order they're typically reached, and why is it that order? For instance, I ...
4
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1answer
175 views

“h” in French words of Germanic / onomatopoeic origin

As I understand it, the [h]-sound in Latin words (habere, prehendere, etc.) was lost before French became a distinct language. But French also has many words of Germanic or onomatopoeic origin that ...
5
votes
1answer
435 views

Do cardinal vowels form a plane in 3D-space?

In 'A course in Phonetics' P. Ladefoged writes: If we consider vowels to be specifiable in terms of three dimensions, this implies that the cardinal vowels fall on a plane in this three-dimensional ...
0
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1answer
466 views

What is the difference between cepstral and temporal domains?

Some parameters of speech analysis occur in the temporal domain (those are the ones I typically understand: f0, formants, etc.) - but others occur in the so-called cepstral domain. If I google "...
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1answer
148 views

Why do peoples(Europe, Asia, Africa, etc) call “God” in very similar ways? [closed]

UK: dieu(the motto on passport - French)/deity(English word) China: tien(Chinese Wade-Giles... t->d) South Africa: modimo(o->əʊ) New Zealand: atua(Maori... t->d) North America: tirawa(Pawnee... w->u t-...

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