Questions tagged [phonetics]

The study of the production and perception of sounds or "phones".

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How does one transcribe a plosive that involves lip closure AND the velum sealing off the nasal cavity before releasing the air mostly thru the nose?

In the conlang I'm creating, I want the clusters /b/ + a nasal. When I say such a cluster, I find myself realizing the /b/ with simultaneous lip closure and the production of a stop consonant that ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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What is the difference (if any) between a prenasalized voiced bilabial plosive and a voiced bilabial plosive with prolonged closure?

The consonant [b] can be prevoiced, so it would seem, at least at first blush, that prolonging the closure for this plosive would entail prenasalizing it. I've tried to produce it without ...
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2 votes
1 answer
315 views

Where can I find a list of phonetically possible consonant clusters?

I wanted a list of consonant clusters 2 to 5 consonants long that are phonetically possible, in other words, possible for the human speech mechanism to produce. Unfortunately, I have been unable to ...
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4 votes
1 answer
380 views

What is the difference between [j w] and [i̯ u̯]?

The symbols [i̯] and [u̯] always confused me, like what makes them different from [j] and [w]?
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1 vote
1 answer
79 views

What the process is here?

Here is a phonological rule: -ViC(-) > -VCʲ(-), where i both /i/ or /j/; and its vice versa: -VCʲ(-) > -ViC(-). (I think that -VeC(-) is possible too). But I don't know what is the name of ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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is this a schwa?

Today, out of interest I tried to unround the /o/ sound of my native language and I got this vowel sound, is this vowel a schwa?
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1 vote
3 answers
137 views

With the English sibilant 's' (voiceless alveolar sibilant) could the tip of the tongue be touching the back of the upper teeth?

The wikipedia's Voiceless alveolar sibilants section states: The voiceless alveolar sibilant is a common consonant sound in vocal languages. It is the sound in English words such as sea and pass, and ...
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What is the phonetic transcription of the vowel sounds in these recordings?

I'm really interested what those vowels are phonetically, sorry if there's anything wrong with the audio, I recorded it with my phone. recording 1: https://voca.ro/1eAvg2BdKK0q recording 2: https://...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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How can I determine Quality of a vowel/consonant without things like praat?

Really is there any way I can determine quality of a vowel/consonant without praat?
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13 votes
1 answer
578 views

What's the difference between a syllabic consonant and a schwa followed by a consonant?

I'm a native speaker of a language which has syllabic consonants, here are the examples კლდე/k'lde, [kʼl̩dɛ] "cliff" ქრთამი/krtami, [kʰɾ̩tʰami] "bribe" ბრძენი/brdzeni, [bɾ̩d͡zɛni] &...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Categorizing "r" sonorants in (rhotic) English

While I usually see phonemes like /ər/ and /ɜr/ described as phonetically corresponding to r-colored vowels, I've occasionally seen them referred to as syllabic consonants, e.g., [ɹ], rather than, say,...
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Phonetics of labiodental / bilabial consonant cluster

So someone asked me the following question. I was wondering why the letter "b" disappears when the Beatles sing: "and I've ((b))een working like a dog" I listened to the Song on ...
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3 votes
2 answers
172 views

How to exactly pronounce IPA

I'm a native Korean speaker, and I somtimes have trouble pronuncing some of the sounds which is not used or not distinguished in Korean. For example, ɛ and e are equivalent to Korean phoneme ㅐ and ㅔ. ...
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Is the Romanian verb "pișca" etymologically related to Spanish "pellizcar" ( to pinch )?

From wiktioanry: "pellizcar (Spain) /peʝiθˈkaɾ/, [pe.ʝiθˈkaɾ] (Latin America) /peʝisˈkaɾ/, [pe.ʝisˈkaɾ]- From Vulgar Latin *vellicicāre, from Latin vellicāre, most likely ultimately from vellus (...
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2 votes
0 answers
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Does aspiration propagate to the following vowel?

My native language is Korean, which is notorious for its three-way distinction (plain vs. tense vs. aspirated) of (non-nasal) stops. As such, I tried to analyze my own pronunciation. Then I found that ...
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0 answers
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Where do the "îs" and "îi" forms of "a fi" ( "to be" ) originate in dialectal Romanian?

perhaps the Latin first person singular indicative "sum" with an "î" of uncertain origin? Im not sure about "îi". I guess from the short "e" /je/ form of "...
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How did latin "de post" become Romanian "după"?

Wouldn't the expected result be: "dopă"? I understand that the short "e" was assimilated by the long "o" from the next word, and then /o/ -> /ə/, but why o -> u ? ...
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Do Diphthongs occur in Georgian?

I'm asking this question because of this study https://www.cambridge.org/core/services/aop-cambridge-core/content/view/A7DCF9606BA856FCA5CC25918ADB37EF/S0025100306002659a.pdf/standard-georgian.pdf ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Confusion about compression vs. protrusion in rounded vowels

I'm making a song-synthesizing software, so I built some models about human speech, and I'm testing them. But it turns out there is an obstacle. I seem to have misunderstood how vowels are rounded. I ...
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0 votes
0 answers
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what is tonal crowding in intonation literature

What is tonal crowding, especially under Autosegmental-Metrical Framework? Is it simply a collection of different intonation tones associated with one segment?
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2 votes
2 answers
227 views

Finding phonetic similarity of names in different languages

I am trying to come up with a way using Python to find phonetic similarities between how differently written names with different meanings in different languages might sound alike. Names can be ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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What does 'anterodorsal' mean?

In the context of places of articulation of consonants, what does "anterodorsal" mean? I came across it in the 2008 paper by Wai-Sum Lee: The Articulation of the Coronal Sounds in the Peking ...
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3 votes
1 answer
106 views

Why is IPA Transcriptions of Georgian so inconsistent?

for example why do some sources transcribe ღ and ხ as /ɣ x/ while others transcribe it as /ʁ χ/ also ა is transcribed as /a/ by some while others transcribe it as /ɑ/ can anyone explain to me what's ...
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2 votes
1 answer
105 views

What is the phonetic realization of /ɣ/ and /x/ in Georgian? are they velar? or are they actually uvular?

I'm confused as to which symbol should I be using when transcribing Georgian with IPA. as native speaker of Georgian myself, I feel my /ɣ/ and /x/ sound more like uvular than velar. I could be wrong ...
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2 votes
1 answer
145 views

Consonant clusters in English - how many exist exactly?

I am really struggling to find a complete list of all consonant clusters that are possible in the English language. Can anyone point me in the direction of one? I have spent hours looking online with ...
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0 votes
1 answer
72 views

English / French speech to IPA

Are there any open-sourced library / Deep Learning models that convert an audio clip of a word to its IPA representation? In this case, the audio is from a non-native speaker and the goal is to ...
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5 votes
4 answers
517 views

Are there any tonal languages with syllable-final consonants that are not unreleased, or even aspirated?

All the tonal languages I have some familiarity with, Mandarin, Thai, Lao, Vietnamese, and Cantonese either lack stop consonants in syllable-final position, or allow only "unreleased" stop ...
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3 votes
1 answer
174 views

Pre-fortis clipping of /n/

Pre-fortis clipping is usually defined as operating on vowels. See, for example, John Wells’s blog post on the subject. But at least in my idiolect (Northern English-influenced RP), in the environment ...
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Native Pronunciation of -rr- in the place name Wirral as voiced alveolar stop -d-

I was surprised to hear the Native Pronunciation of -rr- in the place name Wirral as voiced alveolar stop/tap -d- in this video as spoken by a native centenarian at the time point 0:47: Life Lessons ...
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1 answer
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Is there any articulatory difference between these two IPA symbols?

Is there an articulatory difference between the voiced palatal nasal [ɲ] sound and the nasalized voiced palatal approximant [j̃] sound? If there is a diference, what is it? I ask that because in ...
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What is the difference between a formant and resonant frequency?

From what I understand F1...F4 correspond to the 1st...4th resonant frequencies of speech. Why do we not just call them resonant frequencies? Or, in physics, why don't they call resonant frequencies ...
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0 votes
0 answers
58 views

Experiment to show that phonemes are not invariant: stimuli!

The fact that phonemes are not invariant is shown in many studies. The first one, so far as I know, is that of Liberman, Delattre and Cooper (1952) in their report on the identification of synthetic, ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Accents of Sung Language vs. those of Spoken Language

I'm a GenAmE speaker, but I've noticed that many BrE-speaking singers seem to sing in an accent that is almost indistinguishable from my own. I first noticed it with Ed Sheeran, who I didn't even know ...
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0 answers
34 views

When enclosing a phonetical annotation, what are the differences between [] and //? [duplicate]

When enclosing a phonetical annotation, what are the differences between [] and //? Are they not completely equivalent?
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  • 109
0 votes
1 answer
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Octopuses and Non-phonetics

This is an odd question. I was thinking about octopuses and wondering about the nature of language. To my knowledge (and this isn't my field) all human language has a phonetic components. Are there ...
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0 votes
1 answer
42 views

What are the differences of word stress, lexical stress and metrical stress?

It is said lexical stress is word stress, but I don't understand why they named it differently.
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0 votes
1 answer
122 views

Why does IPA have only finitely many symbols? Isn't the human voice box capable of producing a continuous range of sounds?

There are two things I've noticed: Every language has only finitely many sounds in it IPA, which is a notation for representing all possible sounds in all possible languages, has only finitely many ...
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-2 votes
1 answer
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Which regularly used writing scripts commonly spoken are not alphabetic? [closed]

I believe Japanese and Chinese are logographic and the rest are simply alphabetic or abugida/abjad/alphabetic. Using Wikipedia as a reference it appears their definition of an alphabetic is not as ...
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5 votes
1 answer
192 views

Where does Google's pronunciation notation come from?

When you search for "X pronunciation" on Google, it shows the "Sounds like x·y·z" box with phonetic respelling. Does anyone know if this respelling system is based on a particular ...
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3 votes
1 answer
110 views

Is /f/ more sonorous than other fricatives?

Tashelhiyt permits any segment to act as a syllable nucleus, regardless of sonority. There's lots of theoretical analyses out there, but descriptively, Tashelhiyt consonant syllabification moves left ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Mathematics of Rhyme (perfect, slant)

I have recently been working on some programming frameworks incorporating audio analysis of the English language, particularly whether words "rhyme" or not (pure rhyme, slant rhyme, etc.) ...
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11 votes
2 answers
1k views

What is the difference between /ʎ/ and /l̠ʲ/?

As far as I can find the descriptions it appears that they're the same. Why would 2 different IPA characters used then?
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-2 votes
1 answer
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Is American pronunciation "optional" for Americans? [closed]

Stop consonants: b,p,g,t,d,k are pronounced very lightly or not at all, but this is optional. For instance, "wait"/weit|/ or /weit/, "stop"/st^p|/ or /st^p/ Variations in t ...
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Does an oral stop with simultaneous glottal stop look any different on the spectrogram than the oral stop would by itself?

I'm not always 100% confident in my judgment of whether or not a final oral stop has an accompanying glottal stop. I don't think this can be checked on the spectrogram but would be pleased to learn I'...
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Are there any phones that are produced with the tongue "cupped"?

The book "Experiencing Speech: A Skills Based, Panlingual Approach to Actor Training" sets out to describe all the possible movements of the articulators. One of these is "cupping" ...
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  • 455
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1 answer
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Is there a compendium for sound laws?

Sound laws such as the Canaanite shift, which is the proposed law that Proto-NW-Semitic *ā -> Proto-Canaanite ō, and the celebrated Grimm's Law. Is there a database that lists all transformations ...
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2 votes
0 answers
48 views

Are there generative theories of grammar with privative features outside of phonology?

By "generative grammar", I take the widest interpretation and do not mean "Chomsky's theory of syntax today", thus HPSG and LFG would be instances of GG(broad). Phonology has a ...
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1 vote
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How can I measure fricative voicing?

everyone! This questions regards Praat. I'm trying to find a way to measure the voicing property of word-final fricatives in L2 English. Learners (and often native speakers) often produce forms such ...
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Book recommendation on language acquisition of phonetics and phonology in American children?

I'm looking for answers to the following questions about language acquisition, as far as phonetics are concerned. I'm particularly interested in American English, though failing that any language ...
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8 votes
1 answer
1k views

What is "˥˩" in the IPA?

While reading the Wikipedia page on voiced bilabial trill, I came across a transcription in the occurrence section which looks like: [tʙ̩˥˩] The word is from Lizu language and means 'bean'. What is ...
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