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Questions tagged [phrases]

The tag has no usage guidance, but it has a tag wiki.

-1
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1answer
74 views

Why do swear words mean the same thing in both English and Spanish (possibly more languages)

Earlier today, I was talking about swearing in other languages with some friends (this is a serious question, bear with me), so I decided to look up some lists of Spanish swear words for fun. This ...
0
votes
2answers
45 views

Metalanguage to describe expressing an idea in many different ways

I am looking for a term to describe expressing an idea in many different forms yet the meaning remains the same in each rendition. An example of this: The Australians, Australians, the Australian ...
1
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0answers
10 views

Phraseology definition

What's difference between free-phrase and fixed phrase? Because for some linguist differentiate phraseme (fixed phrase) into 3 part, vollidiomatizität, teilidiomatizität und nichtidiomatizität.
1
vote
1answer
37 views

Infinitive clauses referring to an adjective before a noun [closed]

We know that infinitive clauses can sometimes refer to adjectives before nouns. I feel with what adjectives they can do that, but I don't have any reason for it. Examples; You can buy the best ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Is there such thing as a 'hyperphrase'?

In linguistics there is a common hierarchy of words: Hypernym (e.g. Colours) | V Hyponym (e.g. Brown, yellow) Does such a hierarchy exist within phrases?
0
votes
1answer
58 views

How to extract meaning of colloquial phrases and expressions in English

I am looking into extracting the meaning of expressions used in everyday speaking. For an instance, it is apparent to a human that the sentence The meal we had at restaurant A tasted like food at my ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

What is the term for the formation of word groups with single meaning/function (e.g. “in relation to which”) in lingustics

Clearly - pharases "in relation to which" (subordinating conjunction) function as one word. How such process is named in linguistics. It would also be interesting to know how such formation is ...
6
votes
1answer
3k views

What kind of phrase is “until recently”?

I learned about prepositions: they establish a relation with two words the preposition is followed by an object -the object of a prepositional phrase is made by a noun phrase However, I don't know ...
0
votes
0answers
62 views

Is “down at the bar” an adjective phrase or adverb phrase?

There are three parts of speeches attributed to "down" in the dictionary: adjective, adverb and verb. I understand , that at the bar is a sub phrase and a prepositional phrase. I don't know the rules ...
3
votes
2answers
88 views

Which word is the head of the phrase “somewhere there”?

Robocop's catchphrase is somewhere there is a crime happening If the sentence was just a crime is happening it would be unproblematic for me: a crime would be a noun phrase in the function of a ...
5
votes
3answers
172 views

Does each word category have a corresponding phrase category?

The word category noun has a corresponding phrase category noun phrase, adverb has adverb phrase, noun has noun phrase Other word categories like, for instance, determiners and quantifiers seem to m ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Is there a chart showing all assignments of phrases to functions within a sentence?

For practical reasons, it is obvious to assume there is chart giving an overview which phrases can be assigned to which functions in a sentence. For instance, one sentence function is called an ...
4
votes
4answers
764 views

Is the adverbial phrase and adverb phrase identical?

context I understand there are different theories of grammar. There is the a set of traditional pragmatic grammars aiming at teaching languages, which might not even have names for themselves. Then, ...
1
vote
1answer
220 views

What is the “headedness” of Germanic noun phrases?

Some casual reading of the literature shows that noun phrases in languages such as Afrikaans, English, Swedish, German etc. are more head-final than head-initial. While it is easy to show that non of ...
2
votes
3answers
164 views

What part of speech is “as their native”?

In the sentence: The number of people who speak English as their native language will decline. what part of speech is as their native?
2
votes
1answer
43 views

Having trouble with assigning stress degrees to a long compound

I need to give the stress degrees for each component in "compressed air powered fence post driver". If I want to argue that "compressed air powered fence post driver" is a compound, what are the ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

The function of prepositional phrases

I'm looking at the function of prepositional phrases within a sentence, and particularly in this example as a part of a verb phrase. The example I have is: I remember the precise moment, crouching ...
2
votes
1answer
38 views

“Have in view” - origin

The phrase "have in view" also exists in two other languages that I know, in Russian and in Armenian: иметь в виду, ի նկատի ունենալ. This means it could have a common origin, perhaps Latin. My ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Phrase suggestion model using a gold standard corpus

There are already spell checking models available which help us to find the suggested correct spellings based on a corpus of trained correct spellings. Can the granularity be increased to "word" from ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Is there a phrase for someone being ashamed of, or self-conscious about their accent when moving to another region?

I was reading a book about accents at a local library and there was a chapter where the author says "some varieties of a language are more aesthetically pleasing than others". Some accents are ...
3
votes
2answers
477 views

singular part of speech for multi-word units and expressions?

Part of speech assignment provides a pos to a word. In many pos systems this can occasionally produce errors due multi-word expressions of one form or another. When 'we' look at the text, we may see ...
1
vote
2answers
168 views

Is there an objective definition of compound words?

I've always had difficulty in distinguishing phrases from compound words. To me, spelling a compound word without spaces between the constituents seem to be mostly arbitrary. For example the spelling ...
11
votes
2answers
499 views

Why do so many languages have a phase like “so-so”?

Many languages seem to have some sort of repeating and/or singsong equivalent of the phrase so-so: Arabic: نصف نصف (nisf nisf) Chinese: 馬馬虎虎 (mǎma hūhu) Greek: έτσι κι έτσι Hebrew: ככה ...
1
vote
1answer
185 views

Phrases and clauses used as an adverb, and hence don't take a preposition

He had been in precarious situations his entire life. I know here in this sentence his entire life is used as an adverbial phrase and, hence there was no need of placing a preposition before that ...