Questions tagged [plosives]

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1 vote
0 answers
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How to find a "burst quality" in a spectrogram?

What is the "burst quality" in a spectrogram? So for the example I provided from praat what would be the burst quality for the affricate shown below? Is it similar to a plosive?
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1 vote
2 answers
3k views

How did Ancient Greek 'πυρ' become English 'fire?'

fire is derived from the Ancient Greek πυρ. My question is: how did the plosive become a fricative? I believe pyre is also derived from πυρ; why is it that pyre didn't also undergo this "...
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3 votes
2 answers
1k views

Is a lateral plosive a thing?

Lateral (egressive) consonants are made by obstructing the path of the airstream using some part of the tongue and directing it to escape the along the sides of the mouth. This gives lateral ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
126 views

Relation between VOT and three way distinctions between plosives and affricates

I faced this puzzling Fill in the Blank which asks- VOT can make a three way differentiation among i.____________________ ii. ________________________ iii. _____________________plosives and fricatives....
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2 votes
2 answers
340 views

Are voiced stops in English articulated in the same manner as their nasal counterparts before the stop release?

I have a question regarding the initial part of stop consonants in English. Let's take /b/, the voiced bilabial stop consonant, as an example. When I produce this consonant, prior to the stop release,...
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  • 171
1 vote
3 answers
1k views

Is the consonant [b] always voiced across languages? What about [p]?

Is the consonant [b] always voiced across languages? What about [p] being voiceless? Similarly, is [k] always voiceless across languages? Basically, I am taking what I know in English and wondering ...
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  • 343
11 votes
1 answer
748 views

Diachronic devoicing of initial lenis plosives in English

I get the impression that in the "classical Received Pronunciation" of English during phonetician Jones's era, the lenis plosives /b/, /d/, /g/ (and probably the affricate /dʒ/ as well) in initial ...
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  • 5,543
9 votes
4 answers
2k views

Are there languages with contrasting unvoiced aspirated, unaspirated, and ejective stops?

In English there are just two series of stops, voiced (b, d, g) and unvoiced (p, t, k). The latter are generally aspirated (though it depends on phonological context). In many common languages of ...
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