Questions tagged [pronunciation]

An informal term referring to the verbalized form of words specific to a language. Can also refer to particular individual's pronunciation, as in an accent or a pathology, or a specific speech event, as in a mispronunciation.

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2
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5answers
136 views

Is voice really the only difference between [s] and [z]?

I have read some time ago that [z] is the voiced counterpart of [s], as [d]-[t], [g]-[k], [b]-[p] and [v]-[f]. For all pairs except the first, I was able to consciously perceive it by starting to ...
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Historical pronunciation of Hindi यह and वह

The Hindi 3rd person singular proximal and distal pronouns यह and वह are commonly pronounced [jeː] and [ʋoː], in contrast to the [hyper-correct?] pronunciations [jəɦ(ə)] and [ʋəɦ(ə)] one might expect ...
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2answers
131 views

Why is “convenient” pronounced with a long e?

Why is convenient/ce pronounced with a long e? (Sounds like veen to me) I would expect the ven in convenient to be pronounced as it is in oven , seven, venn diagram, vendor, venison, convent, ...
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1answer
245 views

Can someone explain the English 'W' sound?

I have found out that the English letter 'W', as in the word "weep", is classified as a voiced labiovelar approximant. To quote Wikipedia: Its place of articulation is labialized velar, which means ...
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2answers
109 views

Why are the Egyptian and Hittite versions of Tutankhamun's name different?

The sacred writing of Egyptian king Tutankhamun's throne name is shown belong aside the same name as it appears in a letter written in cuneiform to his majesty from the king of the Hittites. The four ...
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2answers
3k views

How did שְׁלֹמֹה (shlomo) become Solomon?

According to Wiktionary, שלמה (pronounced /ʃloˈmo/ in Modern Hebrew) is the Hebrew version of Solomon. The pronunciation seems to follow reasonably well from the spelling, and as far as I can tell, it ...
3
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1answer
115 views

Are semivowels pronounced differently than vowels?

A vowel is a sound generated by an open vocal tract, with vibration of the vocal cords and without friction. A consonant is every sound that is not a vowel. These two concepts are very simple and ...
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0answers
56 views

minimal pairs for Portuguese

Does anyone know of a list of minimal pairs for pronunciation, preferably with audio files? So far the best I have found https://european-portuguese.info/minimalpairs but this is specific to European. ...
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3answers
139 views

Is the distinction between phoneme and allophone useful in language learning?

IPA purpose seems straightforward to me: map all the known ways to produce sounds using the mouth to symbols and, for a specific language standard/dialect, map the possible sounds of it to these ...
3
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1answer
389 views

Proto-Indo-European (PIE) words with IPA

Are there any resources that can show IPA pronounciation for each PIE word? Either with laryngeals or without laryngeals? Wikitionary gives me only small list Category:Proto-Indo-European terms with ...
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2answers
318 views

from ekwos to ippo : transition from kw to p in greek

I can't understand how the transition from kappa-digamma to pi-pi happened in the transition from ekwos (same etymology as latin equus) to ippo. I mean how did the prononciation change ? Because is ...
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1answer
67 views

Italian Pronunciation Lost in Translation or regional language difference?

Sometimes the "c" such as in Tortorice and Celente are pronounced as "s" which is not according Italian rules. Why?
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1answer
76 views

Why do we write read for both present and past tense, but we pronounce them differently? [duplicate]

read verb \ ˈrēd \ read\ ˈred \ The words have the same spelling, but they are pronounced differently, and one of the words is pronounced exactly the same as a color’s name, “red,” yet its ...
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2answers
95 views

How does the Sankt Goar isogloss work?

The Sankt Goar line crosses the german town of Sankt Goar and separates the dialects that have t in words like wat and dat and the dialects that have s in the corresponding words was and das. Is this ...
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1answer
80 views

What is the term for the pronunciation change that occurs with overuse of a phrase or noun phrase?

I've noticed that when a phrase (particularly, a multi-word name) is used often, the way it's said changes slightly. For example, when talking about the television show "The Good Place", the way the ...
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1answer
54 views

Does a surgery on your short tongue give you benefits on gaining the correct pronunciation in L2?

Sometimes I heard that L2 language learners make a surgery on their tongue in order to gain better pronunciation. Example: http://saundz.com/south-korea-tongue-operations-for-better-english-...
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4answers
241 views

Cause: [z] --> [s] at the end

Someone said that there is a sound beginning [z], turning into [s] at the end of words like cause. Maybe, this is just a recommendation on how to pronounce English consonants correctly, but if it is ...
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3answers
129 views

Why are two versions of a word written in the same IPA pronounced differently?

My question is to be applied on any language; why do I find for instance two versions of the same word written in the same IPA symbols pronounced differently, in case of different accents for example. ...
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2answers
311 views

Is wikipedia wrong when it speaks of the hebrew shwa not being pronounced ə?

Is wikipedia wrong when it suggests that the hebrew schwa/shva has never been pronounced as 'ə'? Looking at these two wikipedia links https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schwa "The word schwa is from the ...
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0answers
35 views

Online collection of the world languages' melodic patterns?

Every language has some very typical melodic patterns and I've been wondering is there some sort of a global repository collecting and comparing such patterns?
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1answer
210 views

What the palatalized [ʲ] means

So I'm pretty sure I understand labialized [ʷ] and some of the other superscripts, but I don't fully understand palatalized [ʲ]. An example of palatalized is Abkhaz, Selkup, Bulgarian, and Yanesha. ...
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1answer
224 views

How to do the Xhosa clicks

So this video explains clearly how to do the 3 Xhosa clicks at the same time as each vowel sound. The Wikipedia page also shows clearly how to produce those 3 clicks as well, independent of any vowel ...
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1answer
96 views

Good audio resources for the ejective consonants

I think I understand the ejective consonants, but even after listening to the Wikipedia audio clips, I am not sure I would be able to distinguish them from the corresponding "regular" consonant, like ...
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1answer
396 views

Types of “stress” in language

Wondering what are all the different kinds of "stress" (so to speak) in any language. I just found out about Prosodic Stress which is pretty cool. I didn't take the test yesterday. (Somebody else ...
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5answers
298 views

Algorithm for figuring out the pronunciation of a word

Wondering how we pronounce words. I feel like I learned this when I was a kid in school with all the language rules, but now I can't remember. I am trying to think about how we pronounce words. How ...
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1answer
196 views

Why do I speak more accurately in English rather than my native language?

I have a diction/vocal issue from birth so I can not speak on the "right rhythm" of my tongue. My speech seems always slow and boring at my native language so that I have a huge difficult to verbally ...
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2answers
554 views

Trying to make sense of “…but voiced obstruents are not always voiced”

I came across the following phrase in a description of German pronunciation: The basic rule is that voiceless obstruents are always voiceless, but voiced obstruents are not always voiced. ...which ...
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2answers
473 views

Arabic /R/ - correct pronunciation in Modern Standard Arabic

Arabic has many dialects, but in general the /R/ in Modern Standard Arabic is an alveolar trill (or is it not?) - like the Spanish perro - according to Wikipedia and it is also what I have heard from ...
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2answers
55 views

What is the pronunciation of English word “feeling” in General American accent? The normal sound [ˈfilɪŋ] or add the “l” sound, [ˈfiɫ lɪŋ]?

What is the pronunciation of English word feeling in General American accent? The normal sound [ˈfilɪŋ] or double the "l" sound, [ˈfiɫ lɪŋ] ?
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1answer
158 views

When does the “dark l” sound in English date back to?

There is no "dark l" sound in Proto-Germanic language and Proto-Indo-European language.
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1answer
96 views

Is there vowel harmony in the way to pronounce re-?

Example: I noticed yesterday that in 'reheat' it is pronounced /i/ but in 'recollect' it is pronounced more like /ɛ/.
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4answers
664 views

What was the original pronunciation of 'ä' in German?

I always learnt it was pronounced the same as how 'e' is usually pronounced in German (in either its short or long forms respectively). But then the question is: why have a different letter for it? ...
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2answers
1k views

Why do Americans and Canadians pronounce “t” with flap [ɾ] in unstressed syllables in English?

Most Americans and Canadians pronounce "t" with flap [ɾ] in unstressed syllables. Why?
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2answers
77 views

Is plumminess pharyngealization? Plus: Deaffrication

You’ve all heard the phrase “plummy accent” and many variants of it. I’ve been trying to find out how can this be called or described in more scientific and phonetic terms. So I bumped onto John ...
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2answers
148 views

Wellsean Syllabification and Recapitulation Symbols in the LPD

Those of you who deal with phonetics and phonology of English, and perhaps other languages as well, will surely have read John C. Wells’s article “Syllabification and allophony”, which you can find ...
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1answer
97 views

Explain ㅎ being silent in Korean language

A: Between vowels, /h/ may either be voiced [ɦ] or become inaudible or disappear often. B: Intervocalically, it is realized as voiced [ɦ], and after voiced consonants it is either [ɦ] or silent. ...
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1answer
52 views

Looking for large word list file/db (>1k) with IPA transcriptions

I'm building a mobile app to practice/teach IPA. The idea is you look at a word and then input the correct IPA. I've used some dictionary APIs, but they either: Don't include the IPA If it includes ...
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3answers
1k views

Dark L vs L Vocalisation

I am a bit confused about this. Question: Is this the main difference between L-vocalization and the Dark L? Vocalised L - The tip of the tongue DOES NOT touch the roof of the mouth. Dark L - The ...
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0answers
100 views

Why does the English Alphabet sometimes function like a syllabary?

One of the things that I never really noticed growing up until I began learning about other languages and the elegance of writing systems is how, in America for sure, we use letters like syllabic ...
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1answer
56 views

How does the pronunciation of r change from “art” to “arth”

1) Does it change, even slightly, due weakening of the last consonant sound? 2) If it does what is this phenomenon called?
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2answers
107 views

Can the “n” sound be made without the tongue touching the roof of the mouth?

I am able to say "no" clearly while simultaneously holding my tongue down at the bottom of my mouth. How is the n sound made?
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0answers
47 views

How much of a difference does vowel mergers make to perception of fluency?

Listening to some example French conversations between an experienced, fluent speaker and an inexperienced learner, I noticed by chance that the experienced speaker differentiates between similar ...
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3answers
215 views

Why do speakers of certain East Asian languages chop off the end of English words?

I've noticed that often, when speaking in English with native speakers of certain East Asian languages, they tend to skip consonants at the ends of words. I'm wary of providing examples out of a ...
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3answers
203 views

Is it possible for an adult to learn a language without carrying a foreign accent?

As an adult, I'm working on learning French, coming from a background growing up speaking a few languages natively. According to French friends of mine I practice with, I have a "good" accent, but I'...
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0answers
118 views

Why is it believed the West Germanic /i/ became /aɪ/ in some cases?

I am no study of linguistics, it is an hobby, so certainly nothing I know about in depth, but this one I do find puzzling. I understand that sometimes sounds change, this happens in English today due ...
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3answers
1k views

Anunasika(Chandrabindu) in Vowels (Sanskrit)

Someone said Anunasika is like trying to say something entirely in nasal voice. So let’s say I want to pronounce a vowel ‘U’kara with Chandrabindu on top of it. I know it’s should be completely a ...
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2answers
159 views

How is it possible to reconstruct old accents of a language?

I just a video of a guy who delivered the opening lines of Romeo and Juliet in the modern received pronunciation of (British) English and then the same lines in what he claimed was the original accent ...
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2answers
290 views

Why hebrew אמא pronounciation vary from the logic of אבא pronouciation?

Why does the pronunciation of 'ABA' ( אבא ) is straightforward, while the pronunciation of 'IMA' ( אמא ) is not ? Shouldn't it be pronunciated 'AMA' instead of 'IMA' ?
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1answer
73 views

How do I pronounce each syllable slowly from a word in audio?

any ideas? Of a software that transforms the counting syllables slowly automatically from a word in audio at normal speed. des-pa-ci-to please. Suppose I want to do that with audios from this page ...
4
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1answer
308 views

Why Is It That Ancient Greek Reconstructed Pronunciation Is Always Used For Koine?

By the time of Koine greek, in general, it was much the same as today, but I always see the Ancient Greek pronunciation being taught, why is this? Is is it because most people learning koine in ...