Questions tagged [pronunciation]

An informal term referring to the verbalized form of words specific to a language. Can also refer to particular individual's pronunciation, as in an accent or a pathology, or a specific speech event, as in a mispronunciation.

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Phonetic/ phonological, not orthographic, syllables of تَطْوِيْل?

Pronunciation of تَطْوِيْل (as verbal noun), is it 'tat-weel', or rather 'ta-tweel' ? Notice the difference in syllable structure.
philo's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
188 views

Is syllabification significant in (natural) spoken languages?

The way I understand/guess it, it's not significant in English, that is, there's no example where a word changes meaning by how it is broken into syllables. I guess and ask because there are different ...
skyking's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
128 views

The vowel used when pronouncing a consonant/reciting the alphabet

While this answer talks about how the names of letters are pronounced, my question is how we came up with this way of naming consonants. Is there an official term for the standard vowels used in the ...
ang_rq's user avatar
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1 answer
63 views

If you hear three sounds in the pronunciation of wuss, are they correctly described?

Go here https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/wuss and play the pronunciation. I hear the semiconsonant/semivowel /w/ clearly, but then to me follows a short /ə/ or a sound more to the Romanian /ɨ/ than the ...
DanielC's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
269 views

What subdiscipline of linguistics studies the relationship between writing and pronunciation?

Most European languages use some variation of the Latin alphabet. However, while most of them seem to broadly agree on what sounds most of the individual letters represent (with some minor differences,...
Dragomok's user avatar
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2 votes
7 answers
370 views

Why do so many loan words have a different pronunciations of letters like X and Q (among others)?

I have been thinking about the following question quite a bit recently: why do other languages, which often do not even use the Latin alphabet, seemingly get to decide on the way their words get ...
Joeytje50's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
164 views

Is there a Mid-Atlantic pronouncing dictionary?

I’m someone who speaks what I would describe as “a conservative American accent”. I sound like General American from a couple decades ago. I distinguish between the vowels in Mary, marry, and merry, ...
haley's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
62 views

Looking for a more general model/theory of pronunciation similar to the IPA chart for vowel sound

I have been introduced to the IPA diagram (the triangle/trapezoid) for vowel sounds and I find it interesting as a model of pronunciation as it represents the mouth position so it can be very ...
MiKiDe's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
98 views

Is there a phonological rule or process that dictates the choice between voiced and unvoiced "th" in the English word "with"?

There are two different pronunciations recorded for the "th" sound in the English word "with" in most dictionaries (Webster, OED). I was wondering if one or the other is preferred ...
komeyl's user avatar
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10 votes
1 answer
665 views

How close are the Italian and the Romanian open central unrounded vowels?

The "a" sound in Italian and Romanian, is identified as the central unrounded vowel and represented as being practically identical, very close to [ä]. Although a is used in these images to ...
cipricus's user avatar
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1 answer
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The pronunciation of nasalized cardinal vowels

I hope to find the standard pronunciations of nasalized cardinal vowels and English vowels. Where can these pronunciations be found? I looked for them in many places. But they can’t be found in IPA’s ...
hangover's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
164 views

How has the standardization of the Friulian language made the language easier to learn?

I read that, the standardized version of Friulian was made to make learning it simple. However, did it really make the language simpler? Are there still variations in the pronunciation of letters like ...
Akshat Goswami's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
55 views

How do I tell apart voiced and unvoiced plosives after a stop with no audible release?

I'm making a conlang and I want it to differentiate voiced, breathy voiced, unvoiced, and unvoiced aspirated plosives, but I'm having trouble telling apart the pronunciation of voiced/unvoiced when it ...
Jay Jun's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
134 views

History and Reason of Portuguese accentuation marks

What is the background of having rules for marking the accentuated syllables in Portuguese? For example the word "tecnológica" is a proparoxytone, and all of these words must have a graphic ...
Bernardo Benini Fantin's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
337 views

In english, what's the origin of pronouncing the `e` as /i/ or /e/?

As instance, the sentence let it be is pronounced /lɛt it bi:/ . And in general, the e seems to me pronounced just arbitrarily. Does it come from Germanic languages? During language evolution, did ...
blue_lama's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
865 views

Does word order and word choice influence how a word is pronounced?

I'm curious about the connection between word order/grammar and how that influences the way we pronounce a word, particularly in reference to dialect. For example, if we take the word 'going' and ...
Jim Terrace's user avatar
12 votes
7 answers
5k views

Why doesn’t a language modernization initiative adopt pure phonetic spelling?

Given that there are language associations that work to standardize languages’ orthography, vocabulary, grammar, etc., why is it not more common to use phonetically accurate spelling?
Julius Hamilton's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
108 views

How did Otto Jespersen figure out the Great Vowel Shift?

How did Otto Jespersen figure out the Great Vowel Shift? Surely, there were no pronunciation audio recordings available. How did he know how British people had pronounced vowels centuries ago? Have ...
Youngsub Yoon's user avatar
-2 votes
2 answers
76 views

Are there any languages with greetings that could be easily mixed up with other phrases? [closed]

I'm currently writing a script in which a character tries to use a machine translator, but it fails and shocks/offends the person she's trying to talk to. Are there any languages I could use that have ...
Southpaw1496's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
160 views

In the Romanian language standard accepted pronunciation, is **noștri** pronounced differently from **noștrii**?

In the Romanian language standard accepted pronunciation, is noștri pronounced differently from noștrii? Could you share any link to a document / book confirming this? As a native speaker, I do not ...
Gabi's user avatar
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1 answer
554 views

Reason for silent letters in languages

Why are there silent letters in languages? I understand that there may be not any reply to this question. But if there is one, I am curious. Like in French: Je ne parle pas français. Why is it not ...
Jane B.'s user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
428 views

How did ⟨x⟩ become /ʃ/ in Iberian Romance?

In Latin, ⟨x⟩ stood for /ks/. I'm a native Portuguese speaker and nowadays in my language this letter can also have the sounds /gz/, /s/, /z/ and /ʃ/. It seems relatively straightforward for me that /...
Mutoh's user avatar
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2 answers
2k views

Pronunciation of D sound in British English

I could be wrong about this, but the D sound in British English (RP) sounds a little different from the American counterpart. Often when I hear the words "Lady", "Ready", "...
iloveturtles's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
226 views

does modern Hebrew have spelling pronunciations?

A spelling pronunciation is the pronunciation of a word according to its spelling when this differs from a longstanding standard or traditional pronunciation. Words that are spelled with letters that ...
noah johnson's user avatar
34 votes
10 answers
8k views

Is pronouncing loanwords according to their "native" pronunciation stigmatised across most cultures and languages?

This old CollegeHumor sketch highlights an interesting phenomenon: it's often frowned upon or disapproved of, at least in the US and England, to pronounce a loanword according to the phonetics of the ...
Lou's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
522 views

Lateral Approximant v. s. Lateral consonant

Reference https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voiced_dental,_alveolar_and_postalveolar_lateral_approximants#Velarized_alveolar_lateral_approximant https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liquid_consonant ...
Jinn Jinn's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
97 views

Name for motivation for synchronic reduction phenomena such as elision or fusion

Especially in spoken language, phenomena like elision or fusion occur fairly frequently, and often to an extreme degree. Take the German sentence 'Das ist ein Besen.', which I might (though not always)...
Sam's user avatar
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-3 votes
1 answer
70 views

What is the name of this Hebrew pronunciation at 0:58?

The pronunciation is guttural but at the same time the pronunciation is the kind of pronunciation that Classical Latin and the Romance languages have! For example, the pronunciation of the Classical ...
Ana Maria's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
190 views

How can I tell the difference between types of assimilation?

I am currently studying linguistics (new to the subject) and I have a challenging time understanding the different assimilation forms. So far we studied these: Assimilation of voicing only (place and ...
KN.S's user avatar
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-5 votes
1 answer
74 views

What is the name of the thing that the tongue does on the syllable pri in Classical Latin, Spanish, Italian, and Brazilian Portuguese? [duplicate]

What is the name of the thing that the tongue does on the syllable pri in Classical Latin, Spanish, Italian, Brazilian Portuguese, and possibility other Romance languages? Since Classical Latin has ...
Ana Maria's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
521 views

What is the name of the category for the vibrations that the tongue does in linguistics?

There are guttural sounds such as the French R so I'm guessing that there is name for the category of speech sound in which the tongue vibrates! For example, in the words pater, et rubente http://www....
Ana Maria's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
54 views

Characterizing the "tonality" or the tone of a language

I can illustrate my question with an example. I started by learning German. To me German sounds very articulated, sharp and clear. I then studied Italian. Italian sounds singing, fluid, warm and ...
kiriloff's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
291 views

How accurate are Google's pronunciations of Welsh words?

I'm a complete beginner in Welsh and it would be very convenient to use Google Translate to show me how to pronounce words and phrases. Can a native speaker or advanced learner tell me if using Google ...
Korky's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
206 views

It is easier for foreigners to pronounce names in languages with more syllables?

I noticed that many cultures do not pronounce names in other cultures correctly. For example, Fattahilah in Java, becomes Faletehen in Dutch and it becomes Jenahtopolo in Chinese (don't know which ...
obfuscated's user avatar
16 votes
8 answers
6k views

Native English speakers: worse understanding of other accents?

In this video, Lily Tomlin (an American) doesn't really understand what Kevin Bridges is saying at all with his Scottish accent. She also says she doesn't fully understand what Chris Hemswoth (an ...
Alex's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
743 views

AmE feature related to American multiculturalism?

I speak with a (General) American accent. Native non-American English speakers sometimes tell me that "you pronounce every single syllable in every word." I've also stumbled upon very ...
Alex's user avatar
  • 300
-1 votes
1 answer
48 views

is this sound [j]? [closed]

is the sound in this recording [j]? or is it just [i]? I feel like all my post-vocalic /i/'s are Pronounced like [j] but I'm not sure.
LinguisticsFanatic's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
172 views

How is the word 'second' phonologically split into syllables?

The Cambridge dictionary says that the word 'second' is uttered as /ˈsek.ənd/, in which the first syllable is /sek/ and the second is /ənd/. My question is thus the following: why doesn't this word ...
thiagotps's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
140 views

is it possible to forget how to pronounce a phoneme that exists in ones native language?

now I know this might seem like a strange question (I'm not sure if I'm using the correct tags) but hear me out. I'm a native speaker of the Georgian language(a Kartvelian Language) who's been living ...
LinguisticsFanatic's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
306 views

is my Pronounciation of [ɤ] and french nasal vowels and [ɲ] correct?

Right now I'm trying to learn how to pronounce different vowel sounds in IPA and i wonder if I'm Pronouncing [ɤ] right. ɤ I've been trying to learning French for a long time and I wonder if my ...
LinguisticsFanatic's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
186 views

When teaching word stress to ESL students, is it worth teaching secondary stress placement?

I often incorporate stress training into my classes as it is very important for intelligibility (as better awareness of stress placement will give students clearer speaking and better listening skills)...
CuriousTeacher's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
507 views

Pronunciation of "ll" in the Romance languages

I have noticed that all the Romance languages (Spanish, Galician, Catalan, Portuguese, Romanian, Italian, and French) usually pronounce the "ll" like the "y" in "yacht". ...
Arunabh Bhattacharya's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
270 views

How to exactly pronounce IPA

I'm a native Korean speaker, and I somtimes have trouble pronuncing some of the sounds which is not used or not distinguished in Korean. For example, ɛ and e are equivalent to Korean phoneme ㅐ and ㅔ. ...
Mango Mochi's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
874 views

Are there languages without the /j/ sound as in English "yellow"?

There are many languages without the /w/ sound as in English world, as in French oiseau, as in Spanish fuego, and as in Mandarin wang (the last three respectively mean bird, fire, and king). Some ...
mammifereviolet4694's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
289 views

Korean tense/lax vs. English tense/lax

Looking at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_phonology and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_phonology, English has "tense" sounds: "p", "t", "ch", and &...
D.R's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
106 views

Does aspiration propagate to the following vowel?

My native language is Korean, which is notorious for its three-way distinction (plain vs. tense vs. aspirated) of (non-nasal) stops. As such, I tried to analyze my own pronunciation. Then I found that ...
Dannyu NDos's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
226 views

IPA confusion, difference between these vowels?

I am having trouble hearing the difference between these vowels based on this website for the IPA and would appreciate if someone could tell me the differences and how to pronounce them. ʊ and ø ə ...
Foofoo9906's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
178 views

Do men have more trouble than women pronouncing alveolo-palatals (like ɕ)? Or are there other physiological factors involved?

I'm curious based on would-be standard samples such as provided on Wikipedia; compare the same [male] speaker there trying to show the difference between (alveolo-palatal) ɕ and (palato-alveolar) ʃ. ...
the gods from engineering's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
83 views

Wikipedia sound samples: vocal fry?

In seems to me that in Wikipedia's sound samples for the vowel sounds, there's often some vocal fry, especially in the back vowels. Vowels like ɑ æ ä e and to a lesser extent: ɤ o ɜ œ. Do you concur? ...
Acccumulation's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
156 views

What is the phonetic realization of /ɣ/ and /x/ in Georgian? are they velar? or are they actually uvular?

I'm confused as to which symbol should I be using when transcribing Georgian with IPA. as native speaker of Georgian myself, I feel my /ɣ/ and /x/ sound more like uvular than velar. I could be wrong ...
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