Questions tagged [pronunciation]

An informal term referring to the verbalized form of words specific to a language. Can also refer to particular individual's pronunciation, as in an accent or a pathology, or a specific speech event, as in a mispronunciation.

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Question on Assimilation

I am currently studying linguistics (new to the subject) and I have a challenging time understanding the different assimilation forms. So far we studied these: Assimilation of voicing only (place and ...
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What is the name of the thing that the tongue does on the syllable pri in Classical Latin, Spanish, Italian, and Brazilian Portuguese?

What is the name of the thing that the tongue does on the syllable pri in Classical Latin, Spanish, Italian, Brazilian Portuguese, and possibility other Romance languages? Since Classical Latin has ...
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1 vote
1 answer
344 views

What is the name of the category for the vibrations that the tongue does in linguistics?

There are guttural sounds such as the French R so I'm guessing that there is name for the category of speech sound in which the tongue vibrates! For example, in the words pater, et rubente http://www....
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0 votes
1 answer
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Characterizing the "tonality" or the tone of a language

I can illustrate my question with an example. I started by learning German. To me German sounds very articulated, sharp and clear. I then studied Italian. Italian sounds singing, fluid, warm and ...
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How accurate are Google's pronounciations of Welsh words?

I'm a complete beginner in Welsh and it would be very convenient to use Google Translate to show me how to pronounce words and phrases. Can a native speaker or advanced learner tell me if using Google ...
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1 answer
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It is easier for foreigners to pronounce names in languages with more syllables?

I noticed that many cultures do not pronounce names in other cultures correctly. For example, Fattahilah in Java, becomes Faletehen in Dutch and it becomes Jenahtopolo in Chinese (don't know which ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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How do the Ukrainians pronounce the soft ц? [closed]

In Russian language, the consonant ц is always hard and not paired (has no soft counterpart). But in Ukrainian it can be soft or hard. So, how do the Ukrainians pronounce soft ц?
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16 votes
8 answers
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Native English speakers: worse understanding of other accents?

In this video, Lily Tomlin (an American) doesn't really understand what Kevin Bridges is saying at all with his Scottish accent. She also says she doesn't fully understand what Chris Hemswoth (an ...
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4 votes
1 answer
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AmE feature related to American multiculturalism?

I speak with a (General) American accent. Native non-American English speakers sometimes tell me that "you pronounce every single syllable in every word." I've also stumbled upon very ...
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1 answer
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is this sound [j]? [closed]

is the sound in this recording [j]? or is it just [i]? I feel like all my post-vocalic /i/'s are Pronounced like [j] but I'm not sure.
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1 vote
3 answers
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How is the word 'second' phonologically split into syllables?

The Cambridge dictionary says that the word 'second' is uttered as /ˈsek.ənd/, in which the first syllable is /sek/ and the second is /ənd/. My question is thus the following: why doesn't this word ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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is it possible to forget how to pronounce a phoneme that exists in ones native language?

now I know this might seem like a strange question (I'm not sure if I'm using the correct tags) but hear me out. I'm a native speaker of the Georgian language(a Kartvelian Language) who's been living ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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is my Pronounciation of [ɤ] and french nasal vowels and [ɲ] correct?

Right now I'm trying to learn how to pronounce different vowel sounds in IPA and i wonder if I'm Pronouncing [ɤ] right. ɤ I've been trying to learning French for a long time and I wonder if my ...
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4 votes
2 answers
120 views

When teaching word stress to ESL students, is it worth teaching secondary stress placement?

I often incorporate stress training into my classes as it is very important for intelligibility (as better awareness of stress placement will give students clearer speaking and better listening skills)...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Pronunciation of "ll" in the Romance languages

I have noticed that all the Romance languages (Spanish, Galician, Catalan, Portuguese, Romanian, Italian, and French) usually pronounce the "ll" like the "y" in "yacht". ...
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What are the sounds that define the r-controlled vowels?

For all the r-colored vowels like ɑr, ɔr, ɛr, and ɪr, I keep hearing this extra vowel sound in between the vowel and the r. This isn’t the case for ər/ɜr since this just sounds like the r sound to me, ...
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3 votes
2 answers
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How to exactly pronounce IPA

I'm a native Korean speaker, and I somtimes have trouble pronuncing some of the sounds which is not used or not distinguished in Korean. For example, ɛ and e are equivalent to Korean phoneme ㅐ and ㅔ. ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Are there languages without the /j/ sound as in English "yellow"?

There are many languages without the /w/ sound as in English world, as in French oiseau, as in Spanish fuego, and as in Mandarin wang (the last three respectively mean bird, fire, and king). Some ...
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1 answer
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Korean tense/lax vs. English tense/lax

Looking at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_phonology and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_phonology, English has "tense" sounds: "p", "t", "ch", and &...
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Does aspiration propagate to the following vowel?

My native language is Korean, which is notorious for its three-way distinction (plain vs. tense vs. aspirated) of (non-nasal) stops. As such, I tried to analyze my own pronunciation. Then I found that ...
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2 answers
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IPA confusion, difference between these vowels?

I am having trouble hearing the difference between these vowels based on this website for the IPA and would appreciate if someone could tell me the differences and how to pronounce them. ʊ and ø ə ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Do men have more trouble than women pronouncing alveolo-palatals (like ɕ)? Or are there other physiological factors involved?

I'm curious based on would-be standard samples such as provided on Wikipedia; compare the same [male] speaker there trying to show the difference between (alveolo-palatal) ɕ and (palato-alveolar) ʃ. ...
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Wikipedia sound samples: vocal fry?

In seems to me that in Wikipedia's sound samples for the vowel sounds, there's often some vocal fry, especially in the back vowels. Vowels like ɑ æ ä e and to a lesser extent: ɤ o ɜ œ. Do you concur? ...
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2 votes
1 answer
103 views

What is the phonetic realization of /ɣ/ and /x/ in Georgian? are they velar? or are they actually uvular?

I'm confused as to which symbol should I be using when transcribing Georgian with IPA. as native speaker of Georgian myself, I feel my /ɣ/ and /x/ sound more like uvular than velar. I could be wrong ...
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2 votes
1 answer
142 views

Consonant clusters in English - how many exist exactly?

I am really struggling to find a complete list of all consonant clusters that are possible in the English language. Can anyone point me in the direction of one? I have spent hours looking online with ...
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5 votes
4 answers
507 views

Are there any tonal languages with syllable-final consonants that are not unreleased, or even aspirated?

All the tonal languages I have some familiarity with, Mandarin, Thai, Lao, Vietnamese, and Cantonese either lack stop consonants in syllable-final position, or allow only "unreleased" stop ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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The correct/consistent pronunciation of -ae in English [closed]

There are many Latin words in English that contain -ae-, including proper names in biology (Archaea, Rosaceae), generic scientific terms (larvae, medusae), Church Latin (Summa Theologiae) and more &...
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2 votes
2 answers
176 views

Languages without phonemes?

Based on my understanding and reading of Wikipedia, phonemes help distinguish one word from another and each phoneme is an "abstraction over of a set (or equivalence class) of speech sounds (...
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5 votes
1 answer
182 views

Where does Google's pronunciation notation come from?

When you search for "X pronunciation" on Google, it shows the "Sounds like x·y·z" box with phonetic respelling. Does anyone know if this respelling system is based on a particular ...
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1 answer
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Difference pronunciation of the word cometh in Middle English and Early Modern English?

Does anyone know how you pronounce the root vowel of the word cometh in ME and EModE? What is this particular sound change called?
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ʃ pronounced with tongue

Some people pronounce their [ʃ] not in the 'classic' way but by curving the tongue and bringing it forward toward the upper set of teeth. Here's an audio example I've created. My question: is there a ...
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Is there a name for the idea of having grammatical rules for the purpose of easy pronunciation?

For instance, in German you'll have Der Mann singular, Die Männer plural, instead of, say, Die Männen. It seems this is because you don't want to over-expose the speaker to the "n" sound. ...
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1 answer
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Adding Sounds and Slowing Pronunciation for "Proper Speech"

I routinely hear a relative add syllables to words to sound more "correct." "menu" becomes "men-a-you." "Daily" becomes "day-uh-lee." It seems to be ...
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1 vote
1 answer
82 views

Why are phonemic transcriptions used in English pronunciation courses (instead of phonetic ones)?

I'm doing an English pronunciation course. There, I'm asked to pronounce, for example, the following: /i:/ In each case, I'm presented with articulatory and mouth position guidelines. However, if I ...
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What were the pronunciations of PIE velar stops?

What might be the pronunciations of PIE "plain velar" series *k *g *gʰ, the "palatovelar" series *ḱ *ǵ *ǵʰ, and the "labiovelar" series *kʷ *gʷ *gʷʰ ? Was the *gʰ same as ...
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13 votes
2 answers
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How did Greek loanwords with 'ae' come to be pronounced [i] in modern English?

There are a bunch of Greek loanwords in English that orthographically include the vowel sequence 'ae'. Examples include: aegis aether aeon The 'ae' vowel here is pronounced [i] in English, but at ...
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12 votes
4 answers
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When we talk about front and back vowels in the vowel chart, does it refer to the position of the tip of the tongue or the whole body of the tongue?

This question came to me when I was trying to distinguish between [a] and [ɑ]. The former exists in my native language and the latter is the one that I'm trying to form. My question is: Since it is a ...
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0 votes
1 answer
68 views

Praat 16,000 Hz

When I opened an American English Podcast in Praat, the area below 16,000 Hertz were all gray or dark. Then I speak some sentences in japanese then the area below 8,000 hertz were dark. How do english ...
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4 votes
1 answer
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In Search of an Etymological Name Database

Do such things even exist? Attempts at searches turn up rather limited and uninformative sites dedicated to parental demographics, and that's not what I'm looking for. Specifically, I'm looking for a ...
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3 votes
0 answers
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Can a trill be creaky?

Or in other words, is it possible to pronounce [ʙ̰], [r̰], [ʀ̰], or [ʢ̰]? I tried to pronounce these phones by myself, and I always failed. It seems the airstream from the constricted glottis cannot ...
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0 votes
2 answers
117 views

How did the "c" in "et cetera" end up being pronounced like an s sound?

I was discussing an odd pronunciation of etc. with a friend when he told me that technically the most correct way to pronounce it based off Latin pronunciation rules would be something more like et ...
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5 votes
1 answer
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Origin of the English word 'tooth' being pronounced /tʊθ/?

According to Wiktionary, the English word 'tooth' can be pronounced as /tʊθ/ (as opposed to its regular pronunciation in RP of /tuːθ/) in certain areas of Wales and the British Midlands. Is there any ...
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0 votes
2 answers
117 views

pronunciation of word origins [closed]

there are many sources for indo-europian languages' etymology but I don't know where to find one which shows the pronunciation of the word's origins. for example, I can't understand how the given ...
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What is the origin of the pronunciation difference between 'replicate' (noun) and 'replicate' (verb)?

In English, the noun 'replicate' is pronounced with a schwa (ə) at the end while the verb is pronounced with the diphthong 'eɪ'. The same is true for the word 'duplicate'. Is there a more general ...
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Formal terms for pronunciations of loanwords in source and recipient languages?

If they exist, what are formal terms meaning "pronunciation of a loanword in the donor language" and "pronunciation of a loanword in the recipient language"? In shorter terms, the ...
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6 votes
2 answers
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Pronunciation of P in Latin, versus Ph in Greek

In Latin, it seems some sounds that are pronounced like an "F" in Greek, are pronounced like a "P", why is this? For example, we have the Greek word Phoenicians, and this word ...
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4 votes
1 answer
122 views

Are "haff to" and "have to" different words in spoken English?

This sentence: How many apples do you have to eat? (at least in my dialect of English) means "How many apples do you possess and can eat?" if the final consonant in "have" is ...
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The possible sound change when /t/ sound is preceded by fricatives or affricatives

Here, I am talking about the assimilated /t/ sound that is one of the most common features of Standard Southern British English (such as /t/ at the beginning of a syllable, time, task, Twitter, twice, ...
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7 votes
3 answers
883 views

What does linguistics call sets of words with the same spelling, different (but perhaps related) meaning, and different emphasized syllables?

In my idiolect, the word "defense", with the emphasis on the first syllable means "the role of defending". With the emphasis on the second syllable, it means "the act of ...
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2 votes
2 answers
160 views

What is the exact position of the tongue for [ n ] in these circumstances?

Hi I am an English learner, and I recently had this question about pronouncing n sound. I understand the standard way of pronouncing n sound is to put my tongue behind the top teeth, however, when I ...
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