Questions tagged [psycholinguistics]

Questions that are about the neurobiological and psychological factors that affect the acquisition, comprehension and utilisation of the language in human beings.

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3 votes
2 answers
951 views

Is there research on which diphthongs are perceived by English speakers as single sounds?

In English, diphthongs are single phonemes, and monolingual English speakers hear them as a single vowel. However, this does not mean that English speakers will hear all diphthongs in other languages ...
0 votes
1 answer
730 views

Is there a Grammar blindness?

John Dalton was born in 1766, in 1794 he described for first time color blindness. No one has noticed this deficiency before. My grandfather died without knowing he was color blind. My first reaction ...
4 votes
1 answer
6k views

What language has the longest word for 'no' and 'yes'?

I'm asking this because I'm learning Swahili now, for which the word 'yes' translates to 'ndiyo' and 'no' translates to 'hakuna.' It strikes me as strange that a language would have such long words ...
0 votes
0 answers
64 views

Which brain disorders cause better second language learning?

I heard that people with some types of synesthesia may have advantages for learning second languages. I don't know whether it’s true or not. Which kind of brain disorders cause better second-language ...
1 vote
1 answer
72 views

How good are humans at anaphora?

I have been considering what differences or similarities in any properties at all could be found between: a language where whatever the supposed “deep structure” of a language truly is (like, the ...
1 vote
0 answers
38 views

What is meant by "present thinking" in Goldstein's work on aphasia?

I am writing a paper on aphasia and have come across some work by Kurt Goldstein. Apparently, Goldstein claims that people with aphasia speak without thinking first, and that their speech is not ...
1 vote
1 answer
44 views

Is it possible (in terms of linguistic relativity) that maybe some cognitive processing happens later & that's why there's no relativity effect?

Title is very vague so I'll explain what I mean. Let's say an experiment was carried out involving grammatically gendered artefacts and whether or not participants will attach gendered stereotypes to ...
2 votes
4 answers
219 views

Does grammar condition our conclusions and opinions?

I have learned two languages from childhood: English and Malayalam. I find it that most of the time when I think and reflect, my thoughts are mostly expressed in English. Now, the interesting part is, ...
1 vote
2 answers
46 views

Does knowing separately phonetic features X,Y,... imply that a speaker will know a phoneme characterized solely and completely by X,Y,...?

In The Language Instinct, Steven Pinker claims that when babies learn to talk, if they have learned in certain phonemes a set of features, then they automatically learn other phonemes characterized ...
-1 votes
1 answer
97 views

Linguistics and ChatGPT [closed]

To which (neuro-, psycho- or general) linguistic models and theories of human language recognition and production does ChatGPT (GANs) come closest? Or why isn't this a valid question?
0 votes
1 answer
168 views

Term for conversational actions meant to influence emotional state

Is there a term for the set of conversational actions/tools that instead of exchanging direct information, seek to instead affect a certain emotional state? Examples of such actions would include ...
0 votes
0 answers
48 views

Multiple-characters vocabulary acquisition by L1 Japanese/Chinese

I am looking for any evidence/reference on how L1 Japanese or L1 Chinese people acquire their multiple hanzi/kanji vocabulary. Take as simple as 折り畳み/折叠 (to fold). Words like 食べる/吃 and 飲む/喝 are not ...
1 vote
2 answers
11k views

Linguistics relativity and linguistic determinism

What is the difference between linguistic relativity and linguistic determinism ? any suggestions for books to read concerning these topics !
12 votes
4 answers
23k views

When you think one word, but write another, similar sounding word?

If you are writing or typing and you are thinking of one word, but then type another word made of the same phonemes, what is that called and what are the linguistic and /or psychological phenomena ...
-1 votes
1 answer
113 views

Even in writing, do bases take longer to construe when they share roots or stems?

Question 1 I ask about merely reading and writing here. Do human readers take longer to distinguish between stems (and bases) that share the same root, even if merely picoseconds? For example, do ...
-1 votes
1 answer
135 views

Can language reveal how we think? [closed]

I have just started lightly reading about consciousness and, in trying to think about what it is, I couldn't help but notice how simply thinking about the pronoun "I" could shed quite a bit ...
1 vote
1 answer
449 views

Why is feeling and hearing are the same in Italian?

Sentire means hearing, and at the same time feeling, in Italian and it's used passively in both senses. Mi sento male - I feel bad Ho sentito il tuo nome - I heard your name Why among all senses ...
0 votes
1 answer
560 views

There is evidence that domesticated animals (cats or dogs) understand human language?

Some pet owners seem to be able to speak to their cats or dogs. Is there any evidence that animals understand human languages? EDIT: By understand, i mean understanding of spoken language and ...
1 vote
0 answers
49 views

Name of cognitive bias/effect causing you not to see your own spelling mistakes (because you know what you wrote)

I’m sure there’s a name for this thing where I can’t see my own spelling mistakes because when I’m reading what I’ve written, I know what it’s supposed to say. So, I’m blind to having typed “exmaple” ...
1 vote
1 answer
572 views

Are there different "kinds" of meaningless sentences?

There is famous sentences by Chomsky ("Colorless green ideas sleep furiously") to show that syntactically sentences can by devoid of meaning, or at least have a very odd or dubious meaning. ...
3 votes
2 answers
192 views

What psychological effects does the language one speaks have on them? [closed]

Are there any known psychological effects that have been observed on people who speak one language as opposed to another. For example, in Latin languages there are genders, in English there are none; ...
2 votes
2 answers
5k views

What do the terms "External" and "Internal" language refer to?

I would like to know about External and Internal language. Suppose I was talking about a person who was not either good or great. I was praising him in my speech as he was my superior though I felt ...
3 votes
5 answers
635 views

Word meaning as function of the composition of its phonemes

tl;dr Linguists like to claim that the mapping from sounds to word meanings is mostly arbitrary. Can you point out research that supports this claim? Specificllay I am looking for hard evidience in ...
26 votes
2 answers
4k views

Why do languages not share a root for "butterfly"?

In the article The Elusive Butterfly. Iconicity in Language (2001), William O. Beeman draws attention to the fact that most languages do not share a root for their word for butterfly. In other words, ...
0 votes
1 answer
128 views

What are the differences of word stress, lexical stress and metrical stress?

It is said lexical stress is word stress, but I don't understand why they named it differently.
5 votes
2 answers
816 views

What is the difference between neurolinguistics and similar fields of study?

What is the difference between neurolinguistics and cognitive linguistics or psycholinguistics? I am already having trouble understanding the difference between cognitive linguistics and ...
0 votes
0 answers
57 views

What is the psychological basis for the argument/adjunct distinction?

I have spent a lot of time thinking about the distinction between arguments and adjuncts. Failing to find a satisfying explanation in formal syntax, I am opening my mind to psycholinguistics. The ...
0 votes
1 answer
283 views

How to differentiate between consonants and vowels on praat? [closed]

I am student of MA and i need your help to know about the praat software. i am stuck in my research in last section. If any one hear to know so i thoroughly and rigorously sorry to say and please help ...
7 votes
2 answers
679 views

Is our mental lexicon structured like a tag-cloud system or hierarchical?

Thinking about this discussion on meta i was reasoning about simple self-experiments you can do in psycholinguistics, where you don't need great background knowledge in Cognitive Psychology or ...
4 votes
1 answer
235 views

Linguistic overview/critique of the Tomatis method

Some advertisements for language training material (like this and this) have a dubious claim that each language has its own frequency range of sounds, or a "pass band", so that listening to ...
18 votes
5 answers
933 views

Language acquisition without interactive contact with fluent speakers

Children raised in a multilingual environment learn all the languages that they are exposed to with no effort. Does the same thing happen if a child has only indirect contact with a language? For ...
1 vote
0 answers
113 views

Do older adults perceive words in different ways than young adults?

Do you agree that older adults perceive words differently from young adults, and learn more innuendos and double meanings? I read a science article that stated that adults continue to learn words and ...
1 vote
0 answers
85 views

Why are the organization of mental lexicon and lexical access interdependent?

I read in Carroll ("Psychology of Language") that how the mental/internal lexicon is organized and how we access lexical information are interdependent issues. However, he does not really ...
0 votes
0 answers
65 views

What are some more examples of doubly centre embedded clauses?

Hey guys I am a uni student doing psycholinguistics and currently studying doubly centre embedded clauses for a study on comprehension. For example a phrase such as: "The man the boy the cat ...
10 votes
1 answer
14k views

Why do some people speak/whisper the words they are reading?

Not sure if this is the right stack exchange site but here goes.. Couple of people at my workplace seem to whisper or quietly speak the material they read. They do this routinely, and they speak more ...
0 votes
1 answer
59 views

Term for Regional "Words per Minute"

Is there a term for the variation in how many words per minute is spoken on average by people in various regions of the country/world? A focus group mentioned they wished our Tech Support personnel ...
1 vote
0 answers
80 views

What are the differences between Frames and Image Schemata?

I know there are several schema based theories in cognitive sciences, including psychology and linguistics. I am also aware that they mostly share a lot in common, as, for instance, Rumelhart (1981) ...
13 votes
1 answer
334 views

Selective fluency - is it a thing?

I speak 4 languages, and I have the least exposure to my native language, since I have never lived in the region where it's spoken. My only exposure to it is speaking to my parents, and some TV. I ...
0 votes
1 answer
74 views

Phonological parallel of a Lexical Decision Task

Lexical Decision Tasks have been used in psycholinguistics for long. It basically asks the participant if the word shown is meaningful (e.g. GIRL) or not (e.g. GISL) (ref: link). But does a test like ...
-4 votes
2 answers
152 views

Why is research on grammatical gender important?

I was wondering why is research on grammatical gender important? Why is exploring this area of linguistics of any interest to linguists? What can it tell us about language (especially with regards to ...
1 vote
0 answers
41 views

What is the phenomenon that each word variation is regarded equally, not a variation of the root?

This is a thing that I remember that I read in a cognitive psychology book, but I can't find it out. For example, the word cats has two morphemes: cat + s. So we usually regard cats as a morphological ...
2 votes
0 answers
112 views

What is shallow semantic processing?

What exactly is "shallow semantic processing", and how is it related to syntactic analysis? Is it correct to say that syntactic processing of a text is the preliminary step for shallow semantic ...
1 vote
0 answers
41 views

Does the lexical path get slower with more entries

The lexical path of the dual-route hypothesis of reading states that people recognize whole words from memory. Does this theory assume the search time becomes greater with more words in the lexicon?? ...
-4 votes
1 answer
222 views

Why is there pressure to change seemingly neutral words that some consider 'offensive' to their more 'neutral' synonyms?

Clearly, there is now pressure to stop using words such as whitelist/blacklist (which are now considered racist) and instead replace them with allowlist/denylist; master/slave terminology in tech is ...
6 votes
3 answers
412 views

A distance on words

I am not an expert in linguistics at all; more of a physicist instead. So I don't know if there are any defined distances on words D(W1, W2) that really represents how the human memory works; for ...
5 votes
1 answer
203 views

Do humans differ from other animals by being able to push and pop memory?

The Chomsky hierarchy of types 0,1,2,3 grammars correspond, as he showed, to the abstract automata classified in accordance with their use of memory. The type 2 grammars, the context free phrase ...
4 votes
1 answer
889 views

Does language influence thinking skills or cognition

I have an intuition, and Hypothesis, that the native language we speak is responsible for our cognition and thinking skills. e.g. Hebrew speaking people would have poor spatial ability compared to ...
0 votes
2 answers
263 views

How did Proto-Indo-Europeans view the world? [closed]

I was watching a video about Proto-Indo-European culture by Xidnaf at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErXa5PyHj4I. It said that Proto-Indo-Europeans probably had most or all of these philosophical ...
1 vote
1 answer
18k views

Reading a word wrong, but reading it correctly after trying again

In several occasions, while reading, it has happened to me that when re-reading a sentence, I find out I read it wrong the first time; every time it is only one letter the one that I get wrong, but I ...
5 votes
3 answers
14k views

Sapir-Whorf vs. Chomsky

Can somebody let me know if this is a reasonable explanation for how the two theories are similar and different? This is not for homework, I'm just try to understand the difference, and my textbook ...