Questions tagged [questions]

Questions about the grammar, syntax, intonation, etc of asking and requesting.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
0answers
27 views

After movement, do theta roles stay the same after wh-movement and verb raising?

The example sentence is "Which purse has Lena bought?" which stems from the statement "Lena has bought which purse". Do the theta roles that bought assigns stay the same after the ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Can one apply Grice's implicature concept to questions : e. gr. “ Does this man look like a serial killer?” ( On pragmatics)

(1) Suppose I show you a photograph presenting the face of a man, and I ask you the question : " Does this man look like a serial killer?". Now, suppose that you answer " no he does not look like a ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Is there a formal term for “long/formal” queries?

So I had a question regarding the types of queries. For example, when we ask a question or do a Google search we could do it in two ways: "house prices in Boston" "What are the house prices in Boston?...
0
votes
2answers
76 views

Why isn't this sentence in a passive form? [closed]

I found this sentence in a grammar book for grade 10 Which CD sells the most? A traditional music CD. I wondered why it isn't in a passive form, or just because it's used in spoken context?
6
votes
0answers
142 views

Positive & Negative Polarity Items, and Interrogatives

There are certain items in some languages that tend to occur largely in negative clauses. In English, one such item might be the word ever: *I have ever been to Paris. I haven't ever been to Paris. ...
5
votes
1answer
137 views

No Semantic Prime For Forming A Question?

"Huh", or some variant of it, is universal. http://huh.ideophone.org/ Yet, I see no word for forming a question in the list of semantic primes. There's "when/time", "where/place", but no "huh" or "...
2
votes
0answers
79 views

Which friend did he find to study with?

The question is about what happens to phrases during the time of making them questions. We know that the following sentence is a normal English sentence which is correct grammatically. He found a ...
2
votes
2answers
72 views

Is either of these meanings of the word “sentence” more conventional?

The Wikipedia article on Generative Grammar states: Generative grammar is a linguistic theory that regards grammar as a system of rules that generates exactly those combinations of words that ...
1
vote
1answer
307 views

Why is it that the wh-word as a subject in the spec position cannot raise over an auxiliary verb like 'did'?

When the question word is the subject of the clause, there is no aux verb, eg 'Who saw you?'. I understand this, but why is 'who did see you?' also correct, with respect to Chomsky's linguistic theory ...
1
vote
0answers
87 views

In construction grammar, is extraction a property of the construction or a separate construction?

I have a question regarding the notion of 'construction' in construction grammar. When a construction, say a coordination or a prepositional phrase or something, allows or doesn't allow extraction, is ...
-1
votes
2answers
89 views

“Is there …?” vs “Does … have …?” Yes/No questions

From my understanding (non-native English speaker) "Is there ...?" and "Are there ...?" are generally used for Yes/No question to ask for the existence of something; for example, "Are there vegetarian ...
0
votes
2answers
59 views

DS for a question starting with “Didn't”?

I am trying to draw a derivation for "Didn't the cat eat the mouse?" But I'm confused as to what the deep structure would be. "The cat did not eat the mouse" seems incorrect, since it is stating ...
2
votes
0answers
175 views

Saying words aloud to confirm/disprove accuracy of written language

I had a really interesting thought the other day: Is oral language dominant/superior in some way to written language? I bring this up because every time I need to correct or edit my written words (I ...
3
votes
4answers
207 views

Do there exist any languages that use inflection to create questions?

In most (or all?) of Germanic languages questions are created by inversion. E.g.: "I am here." -> "Am I here?" As far as I know most of Slavic languages do it simply by adding a word before the ...
1
vote
0answers
81 views

Distal features of wh-words cross-linguistically

My question concerns distal marking on Wh-words. Pronouns like 'this'/'here' and 'that'/'there' show clear marking of the proximal/distal distinction. Wh-words seem to exhibit some similarities to ...
4
votes
1answer
644 views

Question type corpus

I'm looking for a corpus that contains questions and question types. Like in this article, but they didn't attach any link to their corpus. http://polibits.gelbukh.com/2009_40/40_01.pdf
0
votes
0answers
105 views

Alternative subject positions in Spanish questions, economy and markedness

The following six Spanish sentences are different versions of the question/different questions corresponding to the unmarked declarative sentence Alguien más podría haber estado usando su ordenador (= ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Opposite of “intensifier”?

I really like apples. I don't really like apples. In sentences #1, 'really' acts as an intensifier. Using "teacher talk", I would say that 'really' softens the sentence, but I can't think of a ...
0
votes
2answers
75 views

Examples of evolving networks in linguistics

I'm a master student working on networks analysis in general. A network is something that has nodes and there are links between the nodes. Nodes and links could have attributes. An evolving network is ...
1
vote
1answer
161 views

recognizing if a message is question or not?

Although there are appreciable comments and an answer after this question (thank to Robert and Acattle), I am much seeking for a Knowledge branch, (e.g. an "NLP sub-task") than an individual research: ...
5
votes
1answer
758 views

Are there tonal languages which use a rising intonation for questions?

I know that in the case of Mandarin Chinese questions do not end with any kind of rising tone unless the last morpheme in the sentence happens to have a rising tone. For questions which don't contain ...
15
votes
3answers
1k views

Did Ancient Greek have a rising intonation for questions?

Unlike English, Ancient (e.g. Attic) Greek does not reorder words to formulate a question. The particle "ἆρα" does modify a statement into a question, but is not always present. In that case, I ...