Questions tagged [relative-clauses]

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What is the position of 'that' in the relative clause of this sentence?

Researchers report they have engineered an enzyme that can convert 90% of that same plastic back to its pristine starting materials. Does that originate in spec TP and move to spec CP like in this ...
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74 views

Compositional Semantics of relative clauses

How do relative pronouns (which, who, invisible which= WH) fit into a sentences compositionality? Given that relative clauses modify Noun Phrases, I'd expect them to be of type <et,<et>> ...
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What is the syntactic status of subordinate clauses such as “what can be…”?

I am not clear about the syntactic analysis of the what-clauses in bold in the following b-sentences: (1a) These words are weak determiners. (1b) These words are what can be called weak determiners. ...
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71 views

Does the relative clause (which suggests…) here function as an adjunct of the whole clause in front of it?

The high notes returned to his compositions towards the end of his life, which suggests he was hearing the works that were taking shape in his imagination. I'm not sure how to write up the syntax ...
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How common are languages with different word orders in matrix and non-matrix clauses

How common is it cross-linguistically for a language to have a different word order in various types of embedded clauses such as relative clauses? WALS appears to collect information on word order in ...
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692 views

Relative Clause Tree Diagram

My teacher drew this diagram in the class. He seperated the sentence as NP and S2 but it doesn't seem true. Can somebody help me?
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99 views

“To whom” in pied-piped infinitive relative clauses

In English wh raised from, or in situ in, a direct object or prepositional object, you can almost always use "who" at least as well as "whom",1 and in some cases you can only use "who": Who/whom did ...
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1answer
162 views

Are non-restrictive relative clauses adjuncts or modifiers?

In Leo Messi, who lives next door, is the greatest football/soccer player in the world. is "who lives next door" an adjunct or a modifier? My thinking goes like this. If I isolate the non-...
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54 views

Doubly Filled COMP in Contemporary English

Are there any cases of doubly filled COMP in contemporary English? Middle English had relative clauses with wh-phrases and complementisers co-occurring. I’ve also read that the variety of English ...
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1answer
85 views

What part of a non-restrictive relative clause corefers?

I am trying to figure out what components of a non-restrictive relative clause (if any) corefer with a previously mentioned antecedent. Here is the example I am working with: “Mandy Monroe, one of ...
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135 views

Relative Clauses or Appositives?

Relative clauses usually involve the movement of an operator, either overt (wh-operator) or covert (silent operator) The person who1 t1 killed Mary has been caught. The dog Op1 that the cat clawed t1 ...
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350 views

Why in English can't two NPs in a relative clause be relativized?

John Ross's CNPC (Complex NP Constraint) describes the fact of English that after extracting one NP, corresponding to the relative pronoun from a relative clause, no other NP can be extracted from ...
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345 views

Which noun phrases within relative clauses can be [further relativized]?

The term [further relativized] appears in an academic monograph. See: https://linguistics.stackexchange.com/a/19839/13923 This doesn't seem to be a generally-used term, but I'll use it here. This ...
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415 views

In English, noun phrases within a relative clause cannot be further relativized, but this is allowed in some cases in Japanese

Japanese: Revised edition by Shoichi Iwasaki: In English, noun phrases within a relative clause cannot be further relativized, but this is allowed in some cases in Japanese. If there is such a ...
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140 views

When did the concept of constituent movement arise?

As far back as the mid 1700s, William Ward considered the following phrase in An Essay on Grammar applied to the English Language. the flowers which a lady sitting on the seat in a garden views with ...
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717 views

Turkish: the -DIK participles and an information loss

There is something I can't get about the -DIK participles. When we use it to form a relative clause and make one sentence out of two sentences, the object may be originally in any case: Accusative: ...
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3answers
240 views

How does Japanese word order obviate the need for relative pronouns?

According to the Wikipedia page on Japanese grammar: Head finality in Japanese sentence structure carries over to the building of sentences using other sentences. In sentences that have other ...
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1answer
249 views

Relation of Persian “Ke” and English “That” [closed]

First I should say I am not a linguist, but try to understand it to help my English. In my native language, Persian, we do much use "Ke" (که) which almost corresponds to "which, who, that" in ...
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121 views

Why are genitives/possessives incompatible with restrictive post-modifiers, esp. relative clauses?

I have long been intrigued by the following fact: in at least certain Western European languages (e.g., standard English, Spanish, and, as far as I can tell, also standard German and French, at least) ...
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1answer
2k views

Relative clauses in X-Bar

How do I break down the Complement further in accordance with X bar theory.
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1answer
691 views

Restrictive/non-restrictive relative clauses modifying indefinite noun phrases

I'm struggling to understand the restrictive/non-restrictive distinction for relative clauses modifying indefinite noun phrases. The distinction seems very clear for definite noun phrases. It's a ...
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1answer
323 views

Theta-role Assignment in Infinitival Clauses

I'm finding it difficult to figure this out in sentences like the following: a) I have a job to do. b) I need you to go. Surely, "have" and "need" assign theta-roles to "a job" and "you" ...
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1answer
622 views

Classification of Relative Clauses in English

While reading the wikipedia article on relative clauses, I was puzzled somewhat by a description of a relative clause in English. It asserts that in the relative clause "that I saw yesterday", as in "...
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1k views

Sentential Relative Clauses versus Non-restrictive Relative Clauses

I am new here. I dont know how to use it. I am teaching Syntax and I have some problems to differentiate Nominal Relative Clauses and Wh-Interrogative Clause. I am wondering if some of you could help ...
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713 views

Co-occurence of different participles in Turkish relative clause structures

Turkish has two different suffixes for relative clauses. The difference is due to the subjectivity in relative clause. In other words; if it defines a subjective, it is constructed with the suffix -En;...
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4answers
299 views

Adverbial free relative clauses, in early Indo-European languages and generally

By "adverbial free relative clause" (maybe there's a better term for this) I mean a relative clause which (a) is headed by an indefinite fused relative pronoun, e.g. English whoever, whatever, and (b) ...
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Having trouble drawing a tree diagram

I'm having trouble drawing a tree diagram for the following sentence: Chrissy believed that the earrings she bought for Sue were real silver. In the task we have to divide the sentence into its ...
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336 views

Could any one give an example of bare “kind”-denoting relative clause?

There are two kinds of NPs existential and definite. Sometimes NP that we would expect to be existential behave as they are actually definite. One example of such NPs are those that are kind-denoting. ...
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363 views

Which languages have Subject-object agreement in relative clauses?

I am working on relative clauses in Kyrgyz. Kyrgyz and some other Turkic languages show agreement of subject with object in relative clauses, instead of the verb. It is an SVO language. Menin okugan ...
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3answers
1k views

What's this structure called? (prepositional relative clauses)

I'm looking for more information on a particular construction. It seems to be sort of a relative clause made by a PP, but not entirely. I am mostly looking for a name by which I could find it in the ...