Questions tagged [russian]

An East Slavic language spoken mainly in Russia and neighbouring territories.

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3
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1answer
349 views

Does Gothic “Þrabōn” exist?

Does Gothic "Þrabōn" exist? Vasmer mentioned that. http://www.wulfila.be/gothic/browse/search/?find=%C3%BErab&mode=3
0
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1answer
81 views

Does understanding in Russian imply understanding in English? [closed]

I am a native Russian speaker. There is a Past Continuous as well as a Past Simple tense in Russian, does that mean that my brain understands how the tenses work in English too? (English is not my ...
0
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1answer
56 views

wherewith, whereon [closed]

I have just noticed, that I may translate Russian accusative case, prepositional case etc. by English wherewith, whereon etc. I am thought about: 1. "Why is used "where" instead of "what" (whatwith, ...
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0answers
40 views

Data on causatives in Russian and Turkish needed!

I'm working on a comparative syntactic project on the notion 'causative', either morphologically marked or non-marked. References like Haspelmath (1987) provide some (brief) data on the notion of ...
0
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1answer
160 views

Is there a General European English Accent?

I have noticed my former trainer from Estonia, fellow students from Poland and Italy, even Khabib from UFC who comes from Dagestan speak with this accent. Here is a video of khabib from remote ...
1
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1answer
227 views

Are the English word “charm” and Russian word “чары” etymologically related?

Do "charm" and "чары" share a common etymological root? (NB: "чары" is a Russian plural noun meaning "magic" or "charm." Also note that the English noun "charms" has historically meant magic or ...
4
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2answers
128 views

Is Russian “там [холодно]” a case of degrammaticalization?

In Russian, one can ask "там холодно?", literally is it cold there? and "там" is assumed to refer to outside (unless a suitable referent is in the context). The construction can be used in other ...
8
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0answers
137 views

When did countries other than Russia adopt new Latin-letterform-style Cyrillic?

Russian Emperor Peter I famously reformed the Cyrillic script in Russia, where, among other changes, he redesigned the letterforms to more closely resemble the look of the modern Latin script. Here ...
3
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0answers
105 views

How to find words to other languages that have no clear translation in English

For a work of fiction, I have a character who speaks Russian, German and Hungarian, none of which I speak. The character wrote a fictional novel that appears only in its English translation, but the ...
5
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4answers
214 views

Which languages have absorbed the most vocabulary from Russian, and which languages have influenced its vocabulary?

I'm a student of formal linguistics and Russian language, my question has been surprisingly hard to google -- I've studied a little Ukrainian, and I've read that its structurally similar to Russian ...
0
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2answers
125 views

Can “da” phrase endings used in Russian and Kannada be traced back to the same origin (as in usage, not like cognates)?

Example: Can you get me a coffee da , get off the computer, da even just give me a name, da in Kannada English code switched sentence. And Cosmo in Gaurdians of the Galaxy new Comic series can give ...
6
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1answer
233 views

Why is the verb “to need” and “to observe” always imperfective in Slavic languages?

I have been reading into Balto-Slavic languages and come across a problem. "To need" is always imperfective. If I use the imperfective past verb, "to need," I am going to be still, presently needing ...
4
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6answers
670 views

On the phonetics of Russian ы

I have just started an Intensivkurs of Russian. What really struck me is the ubiquitous palatalization, but what I find most difficult is wrapping my head around the sound represented by ы. To me it ...
7
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0answers
145 views

Combinatory Categorial Grammar (комбинаторная категориальная грамматика) developments and lexicon for Russian language?

I am trying to apply Cornell Semantic Parsing framwork https://github.com/cornell-lic/spf (implementation of Combinatory Categorial Grammars CCG) to Russian language. This framework takes natural ...
17
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2answers
4k views

What is the function of the soft sign (Ь) in Russian?

After some searching, I'm still unsure about what function the soft sign (Ь) performs in Russian. I have read that it indicates declension, palatisation, and iotation in different contexts, but with ...
4
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2answers
531 views

Origin of the word/root 'del'

As I was contemplating the Norwegian word "del," which means "part" or "portion," it occurred to me that there is the same root in Russian, and that it means the same thing. I looked up "del" and "...
2
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1answer
142 views

Are Polish-> Russan translations generally better than Polish->English?

I speak Russian natively, but 95% of what I read is in English. Which translation of a Polish book should I read, Russian or English? The question may sound strange, but I mostly prefer English ...
1
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1answer
105 views

Has Russian to Spanish transliteration changed much over the centuries?

I want to know which norms might have governed the spelling of some Russian names which were written down in Spanish around around 1750 - 1850. A number of formal standards exist today, such as ISO 9, ...
4
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1answer
145 views

Pronunciation of ѧ and я in Old Novgorodian

In the first Wikipedia example of the Old Novgorod dialect https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Novgorod_dialect both little yus ѧ and the new я is used. Is it just a random spelling difference? Do I ...
5
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4answers
321 views

American English speakers needing subtitles more often

I often ask my American English native speaker friends this question: When watching a movie in American English, do you turn the subtitles on? Quite a lot of them say that they always do ("in ...
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0answers
39 views

Russian “crude” translation into English for Theatre Purpose [closed]

I am a playwright/performer and need help with writing a "broken" English version from a native Russian speaker of the following. Please note the show I am doing is in the Ridiculous Theatrical ...
5
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1answer
339 views

What phonological process changes е to ё in Russian?

I've been studying Russian for years now, but the one thing that I can't seem to wrap my mind around is why would the sound е je come to be pronounced like ё jo in certain circumstances? Obviously, ...
10
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2answers
899 views

Why don't minimal pairs like “быть” and “бить” prove that /ɨ/ and /i/ are separate phonemes in Russian?

In analyses of Russian, there's a dispute about whether the vowels /ɨ/ and /i/ (typically represented in the orthography as "ы" and "и", respectively) are separate phonemes, or if [ɨ] is an allophone ...
2
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3answers
496 views

What is the origin of the instrumental case of predicate in predicative nominals in Polish/Russian?

The syntax of predicative nominals and predicative adjectives in ancient IE languages and, as far as I know, almost every modern one : Subject (NOMINATIVE) + copula + predicate (NOMINATIVE) In ...
0
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2answers
261 views

Сoncept of an attribute usesd by Russian grammarians

Note: This is cross-posted on ELL.se at Сoncept of an attribute used by Russian grammarians. I need to know all the attributes in theese sentences and how they are expressed.The problem is that ...
1
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1answer
233 views

Was there s-mobile in the PIE root for dog?

I have noticed a striking similarity between the French word chien meaning dog and Russian word щенок "puppy", the both words pronounced exactly the same way except the deminutive suffix -ок in the ...
54
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13answers
13k views

Do unschooled people use cases correctly, e.g. in Germany and in Russia?

I wonder if the case system is devised/imposed by literates and not really natural: it is said that the vulgar Latin that most people really used didn't have e.g. the cases (or all of them) of the '...
5
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1answer
336 views

Origin of Russian class 6 and class 10 verbs

In Russian, class 10 contains only a handful of verbs ending in either -олоть or -ороть. On the other hand, looking at the list in Wiktionary, class 6 contains only one verbs in -рать (орать) and ...
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2answers
130 views

Unknown language on back of paintings [closed]

Can you clarify what language these writings are in and what they say?
0
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2answers
314 views

Theory behind the semantics of predicates

My goal is to build semantic representation of Russian sentences, i.e. to extract verb predicates and fill in the actant words. The tool I have is some kind of a shallow syntactic parser which works ...
6
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3answers
279 views

Is there some intrinsic relationship between the nominative plural and genitive singular?

In Latin the similarity between the nominative plural and genitive singular is most striking: First: porta (Nom/Sing) and portae (Nom/Pl), portae (Gen/Sing) and portarum (Gen/Pl) Second: servus (Nom/...
2
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1answer
164 views

Resources on 'Siberian language'

Siberian language (Ru) is an artificial language project which used to have its wiki pages. Unfortunately, due to the bizzare political processes in modern Russia, the pages were deleted and the ...
-2
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1answer
127 views

What are other 'tacit perfectiveness/imperfectiveness event markers' in Russian? [closed]

I have discovered that making a communicative wishing constructions (like in 'have a good trip' or 'merry Christmas') in Russian, they use different structures depending on perfectiveness/...
2
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2answers
786 views

Two words for “now” in Russian [closed]

There are two russian words for "now": сейчас and теперь. How does the use of these words differ? Is one of them more formal than the other? Which one is the most commonly used word? ...
2
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3answers
1k views

Are apostrophes and hyphens punctuation marks?

The question is: Would you classify apostrophes and hyphens as punctuation marks? Now, Webster and a lot of other sources define them as punctuation marks. I know for sure that in Russian linguistics ...
-4
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3answers
2k views

Why does English sound so cold to a Slavic speaker? [closed]

When you compare English with e.g .Russian or some other Slavic language, English sounds very cold and not warming at all. Could it be explained scientifically? Compare this in Russian: http://youtu....
4
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8answers
2k views

Do I need to learn Esperanto? [closed]

I am native Armenian speaker. I know Russian from childhood. Recent years English became my second language and I am using it in everywhere except interaction with friends. Now I want to learn Italian....
2
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0answers
231 views

Are the Russian уж (a kind of snake) and узко (narrow) related?

According to Mallory we have the following PIE words (in this notation, g = palatal/plain ġ=plain/uvular): a̯enghu̯is snake (> уж) a̯enĝhus narrow (> узко) a̯enĝhnos fear, constriction (> ужас) ...
5
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2answers
403 views

Are the Russian “фрязь” and Thai “ฝรั่ง” (farang) related?

In old Russian the word фрязь ([fr'az'], apostrophe means a soft consonant) was used to denote a westerner. Although the word is not used any more, it is kept as part of some place names, such as a ...
5
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1answer
1k views

What is the origin of the Latin suffix -alis/-alia?

What is the origin of the Latin suffix -alis/-alia? Can it be an Etruscan borrowing? Is Russian adjectival suffix -аль- a borrowing from Latin?
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2answers
2k views

Why IPA does not indicate “soft” consonants in English?

I am a native Russian speaker. Sometimes I encounter English speakers who are trying to learn Russian and wonder how to pronounce "soft" consonants. At the same time while learning English I noticed ...
13
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3answers
503 views

Do Spanish speakers prefer certain words for certain aspects, like in Russian?

In an effort to clearly delineate durar and tardar to my Spanish students, I have been searching for some usage notes and I was not satisfied with anything I found. Instead, I was wondering if these ...
10
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4answers
2k views

What are the main accents of modern Russian among native speakers?

Before I had heard any spoken, Russian was one of my favorite languages. I used to have fun just reading Russian dictionaries, and I thought I'd soon learn to speak it. But when I tried to find some ...