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Questions tagged [spanish]

One of the most widely spoken Romance languages, also known as Castilian.

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Origin of the negative connotation of “boy” [migrated]

Recently I stumbled on a discussion where the word "chico" in Spanish is translated to "boy". To my knowledge, using "chico" to refer to someone younger is considered normal. But in English, calling ...
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0answers
30 views

Which sub-dialect /accent of Spanish is the most removed from Northern Spain Spanish?

I imagine the answer to be something like Argentinian Spanish due to the differing double L sounds, or some dialects that pronounce R's as throat sounds (voiceless uvular fricative?) such as some ...
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1answer
92 views

Why do swear words mean the same thing in both English and Spanish (possibly more languages)

Earlier today, I was talking about swearing in other languages with some friends (this is a serious question, bear with me), so I decided to look up some lists of Spanish swear words for fun. This ...
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1answer
56 views

Is the phoneme /a/ in Castilian Spanish pronounced differently in “pan” than in “papa”?

I was taught that the vowels in Spanish are always pronounced the same in contrast to the English language. For this reason, I always pronounced /a/ in "pan" as the same as /a/ in "papa"—this is very ...
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1answer
26 views

Looking for Spanish email or chat corpora

I am looking for some corpora containing emails or chats in Spanish.
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1answer
91 views

Suppletion of Spanish “matar” (to kill) by “morir” (to die) in the passive

When saying someone 'was killed' in Spanish in the passive voice, muerto, the past participle of morir ("to die") is used: «Selicho fue muerto a golpes por sus propios funcionarios» Galeano ...
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1answer
40 views

Do the WALS chapters cover the core grammatical structure of Spanish?

How complete is their description for the Spanish language? Is it missing something out? Here is the description http://wals.info/languoid/lect/wals_code_spa Thank You
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0answers
40 views

Where did the irregulars come from in the Spanish preterite?

Spanish has many different irregulars in its preterite tense (preterite is what we call it in Spanish class, I think the linguist term is simple past but I might be wrong), most of which involve a ...
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0answers
62 views

Andrea Bocelli Aspiration

I have been listen to Andrea Bocelli's songs lately. A noticeable feature of his pronunciation while singing Spanish songs is that he constantly pronounces the plosives (especially at word-initial ...
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1answer
274 views

Do all colonized countries use formal second pronouns person in daily life?

In Spanish vosotros/tu is used in an informal conversation and usted(es) in an formal one. Whereas in the majority of the countries in Latin America, usted(es) is used constantly. The same goes with ...
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2answers
144 views

Absence of vowel combination /ou/ in Spanish

Spanish has many words containing the diphthongs /au/, /eu/ and /iu/, but the only instances of words containing /ou/ (as a diphthong or in hiatus) are a very small set of foreign loanwords: bou, ...
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2answers
174 views

Choice of phonemic symbol for /b/, /d/, /g/, /ʝ/ in Spanish

Wikipedia states this on the Spanish consonants /b/, /d/, /ɡ/ and /ʝ/: The phonemes /b/, /d/, and /ɡ/ are realized as approximants (namely [β̞, ð̞, ɣ˕]) or fricatives in all places except after a ...
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2answers
106 views

Deducing a rule out of set of examples

Consider the following Spanish words, written in IPA (with their English translation): And the same question for middle position and final position My answer is: Initial position: Looking at the ...
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2answers
183 views

Are the English words “essence” and “essential” related to the Spanish word “ser”?

I always think of the Spanish verb "ser" being related to "essence", which can be contrasted with the verb "estar", which is related to "state". "Ser" is also a noun with various meanings including "...
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0answers
41 views

Looking for a thorough comparison of French and Spanish

Either in English, Spanish or French. I haven't found a comparative grammar but I got pretty excited with this monograph: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_Portuguese_and_Spanish I'm ...
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2answers
105 views

What methods do languages use to re-introduce the subject of a passive construction?

In German and Spanish (I think), you use the word for 'from'. In Japanese though, I think they use 'ni' (which can either mean 'to' or 'at'). In English we use the preposition 'by', which is rarely ...
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1answer
132 views

What are the theories for Spanish and French/ Romance languages not coming from Latin?

I know Yves Cortez came up with theories suggesting that French and Spanish/ Romance languages came from old Italian instead of Latin. He argued that this is because Latin was only the written ...
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1answer
121 views

What is the IPA classification for these sounds?

I'd like to know the classification for these sounds: g, c, z and s as in gitano, trencito, zorro and casa, in Latino American Spanish. For instance, which ones are fricatives, or affricates, etc.
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2answers
119 views

Voiced labiodental fricative in Puerto Rican Spanish?

I was listening to "Despacito", and it seems that both singers use /v/ (Fonsi at 0:42 with his mouth visible, DY at 1:00) as an allophone of native /β/ (still used, e.g Fonsi, 1:52). Most Spanish ...
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2answers
217 views

What came first: «starboard» or «estribor»?

In English, the right side of a ship (and everything beyond said side) is called «starboard». I know enough about sailing and about stars to know that stars can't have anything to do with that name, ...
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2answers
208 views

Two languages have the same homonym for two meanings but different phonetics [closed]

If they got it from the protolanguage, then why does it have different phonetics? Is it possible that they were developed separately? 'Mañana' in Spanish – means 'morning' and 'tomorrow' 'Morgen’ in ...
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1answer
43 views

Can anybody recommend some textbooks/articles that deal with the adaption of loan words into Spanish?

I'm doing a phonology project on Spanish and one of the components is describing how the language adapts loanwords. I'm particularly interested in Arabic loanwords and how they are adapted as I ...
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2answers
92 views

Are the Spanish numbers “seis” and “siete” phonetically similar?

This is a variation of this same question in the Spanish Language site, as I was told it was probably better suited here. When I was learning Japanese (a long time ago in a galaxy far far away), my ...
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1answer
101 views

Has Russian to Spanish transliteration changed much over the centuries?

I want to know which norms might have governed the spelling of some Russian names which were written down in Spanish around around 1750 - 1850. A number of formal standards exist today, such as ISO 9, ...
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1answer
609 views

Get “part of speech” for a Spanish word

I do a little linguistics as a hobby while working of my own software development projects. I am wondering if there is a database or online api where I can easily establish the possible "parts of ...
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3answers
126 views

Spanish Stem Change

I'm looking at a set of data right and I'm a bit confused on how to tackle this. The data is showing a stem alternation of some verbs with [e] and [o] and no change in others. I know this is due to ...
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1answer
160 views

Alemaña/Almanya/ألمانيا etymology

Turkish, Arabic, Spanish for "Germany" are obviously cognate. But not with "Germany" or Deutschland. At least two of them must be borrowed. Which, and what is the (commonly assumed) source?
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2answers
105 views

To what extent can Japanese Kana be adapted to the Spanish language and be intelligible?

I have noticed that Spanish phonology is quite similar to that of Japanese and that their syllable structures are both relatively simple. Say--for instance, that one were to write a Spanish passage ...
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0answers
101 views

Etymological development of forms of Spanish “seguir” from Latin “SEQVI” (*sequire)

I am seeking an explanation for the development of the forms of Spanish "seguir" from Latin "SEQVI" (Vulgar Latin: *sequire), especially the irregular forms. Especially, why did the "e" become "i" in ...
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1answer
58 views

To be or not to be - you got to be somewhere to be something or you are where you are? [closed]

I wonder, in Spanish we have to different words for to be (location) and to be (description) from my point of view, as a natural Spanish speaker tho I've spoken English all my life, just not as much, ...
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2answers
101 views

Does the Perfect in addition to its perfect meaning also denotes perfective / imperfective / either meaning (in English and Spanish)?

Just to note that I'm well aware as to the difference between the perfect and perfective aspects. Up until recently I though that the Perfect aspect can denote (in addition to its perfect aspect ...
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1answer
258 views

Expressions derived from Italian mafia

I apologize in advance for the explicit words, the question is anyway purely linguistical. Feel free to censore the words if appropriate. I have heard that the American slang expression "Do not break ...
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1answer
149 views

What resources explain the oppositions in Grammatical Gender between French and Spanish noun cognates?

Abbreviate Grammatical Gender to GG. This question concerns binary contrarieties and oppositions (Are these the correct terms?) in GG between French and Spanish noun cognates. Are there any books or ...
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0answers
76 views

N-gram translations from Spanish to English

I have a large list of n-grams for spoken Spanish. I wish to establish for each n-grams whether or not it represents something idiomatic (phrasal verb, idiom etc.) or not. For example, these are ...
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2answers
135 views

For adjectives which change meaning by position: why are they subjective before nouns but objective after?

Meaning-changing adjectives [Source:] Some adjectives can mean different things depending on their placement around the noun they modify. When placed after the noun like normal, the ...
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1answer
322 views

Why the grammatical difference between “eu gosto” in Portuguese and “me gusta” in Spanish. What's the historical evolution of this expression?

Apparently, "eu" is the subject in "eu gosto (de isso)" while "me" is the object in "me gusta (algo)". Why such a difference between two languages? What's the historical evolution of this expression?
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2answers
438 views

How to determine an immediate constituent of a sentence [closed]

I am studying Spanish and Portuguese at university, and I am having some trouble with part of a Spanish linguistics assignment. I would be very grateful if somebody could shed some light on how to ...
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0answers
12 views

Please recommend books or resources written in Spanish, for learning Latin for the first time? [duplicate]

This question restricts the second (unanswered) part here, with the additional stipulation that the reader has studied and knows no Latin whatsoever (but who knows that Spanish is a Romance language ...
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1answer
150 views

Have the Spanish tenses stopped evolving?

I suspect that evolution of Spanish tenses stopped, while being in the middle of replacement of conjugated tenses by compound tenses. In some scenarios compound tense was adopted, in some other cases ...
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1answer
232 views

What explains the sound development from Latin -vi- to French -dg- ?

abridge (v.) [...] from Old French abregier "abridge, diminish, shorten," from Late Latin abbreviare "make short" (see abbreviate). The sound development from Latin -vi- to French -dg- is ...
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2answers
260 views

What explains the differences between doublet verbs that differ by a prefix?

The differences in meanings of doublet verbs such as 3-6 below: Are there any resources that investigate the big picture behind them? I abhor to memorise, and prefer to understand, such differences. ...
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4answers
166 views

Forced aligner in Spanish? (Similar to P2FA)

I am looking for a forced aligner in Spanish. Something similar to P2FA for American English. I want to force align simple sentences in Mexican Spanish for a project. Does anyone know one?
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1answer
66 views

Comprehensive diacritics normalization

I would like to construct a normalization program for text containing diacritics or special symbols. For some languages that I am familiar with, I can obtain a canonical form easily; German: ä -> ...
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1answer
164 views

Use of subjunctive in various languages

The subjunctive is most often used when expressing volition. Using English and Spanish as examples: The doctor recommends that you eat vegetables and fruits. El médico recomienda que comas ...
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6answers
685 views

Natural vs. “Forced” language learning

Would the "natural" way of learning a language (the way we learn our mother tongue) be better even for acquiring second (and third, etc.) languages? What I mean is: The "natural" way to learn a ...
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1answer
149 views

Why aren't there conjunctive adverbs in Portuguese?

In English, German, and even Spanish, there is a constituent which appears to be a a gray area between adverbs and conjunctions: the conjunctive adverb, or adverbial conjunction. Examples of those ...
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1answer
46 views

online word references for Spanish

Creating flashcards for Spanish was a real pain, so I started trying to automate it. What I have now is something can take a list of verbs in the infinitive form and generate flashcards with ...
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1answer
159 views

Are Spanish “que” clauses following “parece” complements or postponed subjects?

The Spanish equivalent of It seems that they hate each other is Parece que se odian. In both languages seem/parecer are one-place predicates (well, both can optionally accept a second argument with ...
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1answer
102 views

Is «plausible» a false friend between English and Spanish? [closed]

I'm a native Spanish speaker and today I was just wondering about this, if it's a case like bizarre and bizarro (which in Spanish means «generous» or «brave», not «weird»). I couldn't fully ...
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2answers
353 views

Before being borrowed by Europeans, was “hurricane” ever pronounced with an initial “f”?

According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, Spanish works about the New World in the 1500s wrote the word we spell in modern English as "hurricane" alternatively as "huracan" or "furacan". A ...