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Questions tagged [stress]

Emphasis given to a syllable relative to other syllables.

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'Interstitial' tones in Thai

You don't have to listen to authentic Thai for very long to realize that comparatively few words are pronounced with the dictionary tone. All the learning material out there seems to be focused on ...
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84 views

The rule of location of stress in English verbs

There are three sets of verbs to point out the location of stress, which are: (Bold implies stress) A => exit B => exist C => improve, surprise C - consonant / V - Vowel According to this data, ...
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38 views

Different ways to interpret stressed words in a sentence

I'm reading an introductory book on syntax and one of the exercises says to discuss the interpretations which the italicized expression can have in the given sentences and to give an appropriate ...
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47 views

Accurately representing stress

Wondering how to accurately represent stress. In IPA, stress, is marked with ˈ◌. But in languages like Spanish (don't know of other languages that use acute accent, other than Ancient Greek), you have ...
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56 views

Types of “stress” in language

Wondering what are all the different kinds of "stress" (so to speak) in any language. I just found out about Prosodic Stress which is pretty cool. I didn't take the test yesterday. (Somebody else ...
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37 views

Example of stress or tone on a consonant

Wondering if there is such thing as stress on a consonant, e.g. t́, ĺ, ḿ, ś, ʃ́... If so, what the example language would be. I haven't seen any on Wikipedia. Same thing for tone, I haven't seen ...
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223 views

Does syntactic stress exist?

From what I know, stress can only be assigned at the level of the word (as in English) or the level of the sentence (as in French). Can any natural language assign it syntactically, e.g., "the first ...
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77 views

Sentence stress detection

I was looking for APIs for the detection of sentence stress, also known as prosodic stress, based on input audio. (Ideally, I was hoping for a library able to assess the level of prominence of a ...
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30 views

Measuring phonetic correlates of stress (intensity in particular)

It's normal enough for people to say that we can attribute the percept of 'stress accent' to certain acoustic correlates – usually higher relative fundamental frequency, intensity, and duration of ...
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38 views

What does “directionality of footing” mean?

How do we understand if the foot construction is Right to Left or Left to Right? Does it have to do with the head of the foot? For example, in a trochee (the head is leftmost in the foot), is the ...
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Does the scope of negation change when there is a stressed word within a sentence?

For example, in the sentence ‘your daughter don’t hate school’, the scope of negation would be entire sentence. However if 'your' is phonologically stressed like 'YOUR daughter don't hate school', ...
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Do a classification of words with two or more stressed syllables exist?

In phonology, words can be classified according to the position of the stressed syllable: An oxytone word is a word stressed in the last syllable. A paroxytone word is a word stressed in the second ...
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64 views

What is the linguistic cause of the formation of “competete” a wrong variant of “compete”?

Competete a variant of Compete used in colloquial speech, but is written with the same spelling as the latter, has come into use (at the least) in Indian English variants if in no other English ...
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“split into” — putting the stress on the right syllable

I heard a non-native speaker of English saying something would be "split into". After a fraction of a second I realized that what was intended was "split in two". The difference appears to be that ...
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128 views

Is there a known reason for the position of the stress in “concupisc-” words in English?

The words concúpiscent, concúpiscence, concúpiscible seem to be irregularly stressed (at least, according to their dictionary pronunciations; regularized pronunciations apparently have been heard "in ...
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graphical representation that exemplifies the different between stressed-timed and syllable-timed languages

A student asked why English and French have different rhythms. luckily, I had an answer on hand: English is a stressed-timed language - rhythmic beats align with stressed syllables French is a ...
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Can word stress always been seen in the signal as increased f0?

Of course stress is manifest in a variety of ways, not just increased f0, and f0 indicates much more than just stress - but is it accurate that stress always entails at least increased f0?
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175 views

Swahili stress with two vowels in a row, how does it work?

I'm uncertain how stress works with two vowels in a row, so I used a regex to grab some words out of a small learner's-dictionary, and then make the two possible stress-patterns after each entry, ...
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2answers
446 views

Consonant gemination and stress patterns

Is there a strong correlation between geminate consonants and initial-syllable stress, or stress in the earlier syllables of words? A survey of European languages suggests that there might be such a ...
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Support vector machines for stress prediction

I am fairly new to support vector machines and I was thinking about whether or not I could use them to tackle a specific research question in linguistics: My goal would be to find the probabilities ...
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159 views

How is stress marked in IPA?

I would just like to know if this is correct. I have this text, I'm having a hard time trying to figure out this; mark primary stress (and secondary, if appropriate) on the correct syllables using ...
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405 views

What is the phonetic difference between “White House” and “white house”?

I guess this is really a difference of stress (though I confess, as a non-native, I barely perceive it). Obama lives in the White House (white has primary stress?) I live in the white house on this ...
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1answer
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Having trouble with assigning stress degrees to a long compound

I need to give the stress degrees for each component in "compressed air powered fence post driver". If I want to argue that "compressed air powered fence post driver" is a compound, what are the ...
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Why are “economics” and “economist” stressed on different syllables while both of them have the same number of syllables?

According to rule No. 4 in this link, the suffix "-ist" does not affect the stress of a word. Hence the stress assignment rule σ → [+stress] / ___ ((˘) σ) ]word should apply to both words. What makes ...
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What can be said about the evolution of syllable stress in related languages?

Remembering a Czech song I once learnt I remembered a short Czech crash course I had and the teacher who said: In Czech, stress is always on the first syllable. This got me thinking and I ...
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179 views

English stress, abstract analysis

I am reading introductory phonology by Bruce Hayes, in chapter 12 he proposed an abstract analysis for English stress.Based on his proposed a word like cassette has been through a process like below: ...
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81 views

What's the explanatory value of Metrical Trees?

What's the explanatory value of metrical trees used to account for prominence relations or syllable stress? At first reflection, it seems to me like rules should be sufficient (indeed, rules and trees ...
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92 views

How do we define foot in Mandarin Chinese?

As we known, foot is a stress-related unit. But in Mandarin, the existence of stress remains controversial, so I would like to know the formation of foot in Mandarin Chinese. Thanks.
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Irregular penultimate stress in English words from classical sources

Wikipedia says about stress in Latinate English words: In words of three or more syllables, stress falls either on the penult or the antepenult (third from the end), according to these criteria: ...
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196 views

Word reduction and American T before consonant

when I pronounce the phrase "It was good" in a context like this one: Person A: How was your day? Person B: It was good. I think that "was" is reduced to wəz (with a schwa sound). The only word ...
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1answer
3k views

Word stress in English

Though English stress is free there are certain factors or tendencies that determine the place and different degrees of word stress. Vassiliev describes them as follows: Recessive tendency is when ...
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3answers
286 views

Negation word and stress in English

in the phrase "It's funny", the stress is usually on the first syllable of the adjective: [ ɪts ˈfʌ ni ] But what happens when the negation "not" appears? [ ɪts nɑt ˈfʌ ni ] I'm quite sure the ...
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Linguistic typology of isochrony and intonation

I don't have much of a background in linguistics, and I can't tell if some of the terms I am seeing are overloaded or unique in meaning. Specifically, I've been told that language timing can be ...
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Why do these names from the Bible have these stress patterns?

In reading particularly the Old Testament, I think I note a pattern formed by many names such as: Israel, Abraham, Jerusalem, Solomon, Babylon, Zerubbabel, Lebanon, Capernaum, Zebulun, Galilee, ...
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Stress rules in English adjective-noun combinations

In English adjective-noun combinations the noun commonly carries the main stress: a big HOUSE a beautiful DOG An exception to this rule are adjective-noun combinations that are treated as one unit, ...
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273 views

Dictionary of Georgian language with lexical stress?

I search for dictionary of Georgian with lexical stress, but i can't find online of offline. Perhaps Georgian have any explicit rules for lexical stress which i don't know?
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210 views

In languages whose syllables are of roughly equal length, how is stress typically indicated?

In languages whose syllables are approximately equal in length, how is stress typically indicated? Stress in English is typically indicated by any or all of the following: length, loudness, an pitch....
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What is the difference between syllable-timing and stress-timing?

From what I've heard, syllable-timed languages have syllables of equal length throughout each breath-group (i.e. bit of spoken discourse said in one breath), and stress-timed languages have breath-...
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957 views

Latin stress rules: exceptions

Do the Latin stress rules (antepenultimate if penultimate is light, penultimate if heavy) have any known exceptions? Also, sometimes the rule assigns antepenultimate stress to a syllable belonging to ...
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Do any languages have different syllable weight criteria for primary and secondary stress?

Some languages count the same syllable as "light" or "heavy" depending on the phonological process in question. For example, in Lhasa Tibetan, a CVC syllable ending in a sonorant is heavy for tone ...
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Is it common to use the minor third for calling someone?

In German, calling someone's two-syllable name is tied very strongly to the minor third. In languages that like to have a stressed last syllable, I would expect the last syllable to be higher than ...