Questions tagged [systemic-functional]

Systemic-functional linguistics is a school of linguistics founded by M.A.K. Halliday.

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A Question on 'Topical Progression': How to Address Internal Inconsistencies in the Framework

(This question has been moved from English Language Stack Exchange on account of relevancy.) In my mission to improve my writing, I have come across a concept called 'topical progression' (discussed ...
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Difficulty differentiating the group expansions from elliptical from using systemic functional grammar

An enthusiast of grammar, specifically Systemic Functional Grammar introduced Halliday. Befuddled about differentiating the difference between an elliptical clause and expansion to phrase/groups. ...
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What is "o'clock" in English?

Please don't say "adverb" because that is an ad hoc part of speech that means "anything that doesn't fit". Certain words in the English language, from a functional perspective, map ...
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What are the contemporary schools of linguistics? [closed]

What are the contemporary schools of linguistics? Which of them are more influential and which are more promising? Which schools do the following books on English grammars belong to: Huddleston & ...
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Which school of linguistics is the most related to computational linguistics and NLP?

I heard that there are different schools of linguistics: functional, cognitive, and structural/generative/formal. I was wondering which schools the following books belong to: Essentials of ...
Tim's user avatar
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What is the subfield of linguistics that studies how different languages use different grammatical and lexical tools to put expressions together?

For example, to express possession, in English we say "I have a pen", while in Russian we say "У меня есть ручка" (lit. "A pen is near me"), while in Latin we say ...
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Why treat 'verbal group', not 'verb phrase', as a constituent of a clause in Systemic Functional Grammar?

SFC (Halliday, etc.) doesn't treat as a constituent of a clause a verb phrase (VP), which combines with an noun phrase (NP) to form a clause in a canonical English construction. Instead, SFC uses the ...
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Do all frameworks of syntax view the string following an inverted auxiliary verb in English as the complement of the auxiliary?

This is a follow-up question of an earlier question titled: In X bar theory, is the first auxiliary the head of an interrogative clause and the remainder the complement? In that question, I had this ...
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Transitivity analysis of subjunctives and imperatives

I'm attempting a functional analysis of the text of the Catholic Mass, primarily in English but with reference to the Latin. The use of grammatical moods is quite rich, with plenty of subjunctives ('...
Gareth Gilbert-Hughes's user avatar
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By what algorithmic process do systemic functional linguistics think surface language is generated?

I am very interested in the idea of systemic functional linguistics as an alternative to the simplistic production grammars advanced by the minimalist program. What I don't understand is how SFL ...
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Verb processess

I am studying Discourse Analysis and I need to analyze a text regarding its verbal processes. Everything was going well until I saw this sentence that is burning my head completely!! : I am ...
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From a systemic functional approach, what would a transitivity analysis of 'be that as it may' show?

I found this beautifully organized text for my students to analyze in terms of thematic progression. I'll also ask them to provide a transitivity analysis of some of its clauses, but there's that ...
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The place of "isolated" nominal and prepositional elements/groups within a transitivity analysis

What is the place of "isolated" (i.e. "standing alone") nominal and prepositional elements/groups within a transitivity analysis (i.e. there is no mention of an explicit process), and how can one ...
M.D89's user avatar
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Useful software and/or "manual" method for data analysis in a stylistic study of transitivity (SFL)

What would be a useful software and/or systematic "manual" method for data analysis in a study of transitivity (Systemic Functional Linguistics) that would like to incorporate some kind of statistics ...
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New Scientist Article on Spoken Language? [closed]

I wondered if anyone had seen this article on Relational Frame Theory in the most recent edition of the New Scientist? It reports an active laboratory based research programme: https://www....
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What is the difference between 'actor' and 'subject' in systemic functional grammar?

What is the difference between 'actor' and 'subject' in systemic functional grammar? Sometimes in a functional grammar, 'actor' has a different meaning
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Why is a nominalisation called "grammatical metaphor" in SFL

I have learned to understand that a nominalisation is called a grammatical metaphor in systemic functional linguistics. What is the motivation behind this terminology? Are there other kinds of ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
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What are the differences between theoretical perspectives of the uses of the term "register"?

I'd be interested in asking people about their understanding of the term register and what this signifies for them. This would be a discussion about a specialised term and I'm sure there are multiple ...
Daniel O'Sullivan's user avatar
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What's the best way to combine systemic functional grammar and historical linguistics?

What's the best way to combine SFL/SFG and historical linguistics? I've just thought of diachronic genre analysis as being an interesting area to explore, but my understanding is that that's got more ...
nnad's user avatar
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1 answer
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current state of affairs in (systemic) functional grammar/linguistics? [duplicate]

What is the state of affairs in (systemic) functional grammar/linguistics in 2015 (rather than the state of affairs in the 1970s-1990s, when most of the books and papers I have were published)? I'm ...
nnad's user avatar
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What is the current status of (systemic) functional grammar/linguistics

I'm sorry if my questions may sound rudimentary, so please bear with me. :-) I'm thinking of delving deeper into functional grammar/linguistics (most probably systemic in particular), perhaps with ...
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Why hasn't functional grammar been more popular?

It’s nearly 30 years since Michael Halliday first published ‘An Introduction to Functional Grammar’ and yet, at least in Britain and in the United States, functional grammar seems not to have entered ...
Barrie England's user avatar