Questions tagged [terminology]

Words, phrases, and acronyms specific to the study of linguistics.

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1answer
1k views

How exactly are noun classes different to classifiers?

Before the beta I would've thought questions like this one would be such basic concepts that most contributors would be familiar with them. But after a few questions on gender and animacy it seems ...
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What linguistic operation is used in “I declined your report”

The OP in this EL&U question says: ?I declined your report. There is some mutually-understood portion that was dropped from the sentence. In my answer (comment section), I contrasted Visa ...
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Meaning of star/asterisk in linguistics

In some dictionaries/lexica, I've seen the asterisk in front of old words. What does it mean/stand for? Example: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proto-Germanic#Pre-Proto-Germanic *ǵʰóstis "stranger" >...
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1answer
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What are the criteria for deciding whether a language is “a vernacular”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What are the criteria for deciding whether a language is “natural”? Edited to add: I've been directed by the moderators to revise my earlier question (What are the ...
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Is there a term for the theory that languages move from one morphological typology to the next in a fixed cycle?

There is a well known theory, widely accepted that as languages evolve their morphological typology changes through the same usual steps. The major steps are I think isolating or analytic, inflected, ...
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What are the criteria for deciding whether a language is “natural”?

I read in the Linguistics section on the Wikipedia page for American Sign Language that ASL was "proven [to be a natural language] to the satisfaction of the linguistic community by William Stokoe, ...
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3answers
604 views

Are there counterparts to phones and phonetics for signed languages?

Given that there is a difference between phonetics and phonology, and that in the study of signed languages cherology is the counterpart to phonology, are there also counterparts to phones and ...
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What is a phoneme in the context of a signed language?

A phoneme is the smallest contrastive unit in the sound system of a language. SIL.
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What is the difference between a “mixed language” and a “creole”?

A creole is defined as a pidgin (or trading language) which becomes a full language after being used by a new generation as their first language. Generally they take most of their grammar from one ...
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What's the difference between phonetics and phonology?

Having practiced armchair linguistics for some years I should be able to sum up the difference off the top of my head, yet often I don't know which term to use. And looking them up on Wikipedia doesn'...
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What is the terminology for a source language for new word production?

For example, Latin is used as a source language for scientific terms in many European languages, and English is used as a source for technology-related terms in other languages
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What are some recommended online dictionaries for linguistic terms?

For one to find out about the definitions of "generative grammar", "sandhi phenomenon", "agglutinative morphology", etc.
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Is there a term for the syntax difference between English “I like you” and Spanish “Tú me gustas”?

English and Spanish each have one main verb for "to like". In English "to like", the grammatical subject must be the one doing the appreciating: I like her. But with Spanish "gustar", the person ...

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