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Questions tagged [verbs]

Part of speech whose members indicate an action or a state of being.

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Georgian "suffixal nominal marker"

Let me conjugate აშენება asheneba "to build" as an example. In the present indicative: ვაშენებ v-a-shen-eb-Ø "I build" აშენებ Ø-a-shen-eb-Ø "you build" აშენებს Ø-a-shen-...
Arcaeca's user avatar
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13 views

What is a term to describe "attempting to refute?" [migrated]

Is there any simplistic way of describing the attempt of refute rather than just saying refuting? In conjunction, I would usually just further elaborate upon the verb with more descriptors and/or ...
My Info's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
52 views

Anaphora in the VP shell

I'm trying to build a sentence with an anaphora in place of the direct object or the oblique in the VP layer in order to understand whether it's the oblique or the patient occupying SpecV. According ...
LarenEmpty's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
41 views

"Focussed for locus"

Wikipedia mentions that one of the slots in the Sumerian verb template is the "conjugation prefixes", whose meaning no one apparently knows for sure, other than that every verb has to have ...
Arcaeca's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
61 views

Inchoative aspect and movement verbs

I'm relatively new to the topic of grammaticalization and I'm investigating the grammaticalization of motion verbs, e.g. the movement verb gaan ('to go') can have an inchoative function in Dutch (Ze ...
user45203's user avatar
-3 votes
1 answer
104 views

Finite/non-finite clauses

If the word "was" comes before an -ing verb, for example in "while he was sleeping", is this a finite or non-finite clause and why?
anonymous.user's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
140 views

Is there a reason why certain verbs use certain cases?

For examples, in German there are certain verbs that always use the dative cases and others that always use the accusative case. Is there a logical or semantical reason for this? Does the use of a ...
Agustin G.'s user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
163 views

Why is the future tense almost completely regular in Portuguese?

In Portuguese (Br, and I think Pt too), the future tense of a verb can be created by taking its infinitive, and adding a suffix depending on the subject, e.g.: to think -> pensar I will think -> ...
RLanguage's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
100 views

"Typically, the subject has the agent role" -- how frequent is this, really?

In introductory books or reference works, this kind of statement recurs over and over: "In the active voice, the subject is typically an agent". However, it is obvious that many verbs have ...
Alazon's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
58 views

Apparently agentive -r forms in Old Norse

I'm trying to understand forms like "Hræsvelgr" (Mythological creature; lit. corpse swallower) and "vínsvelgr" (Drunkard) in Old Norse. The verb "svelga" is "to ...
LeaG's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
152 views

Can a strong verb change to weak?

Can a strong verb in the course of time change to weak verb? MoDu "scheiden" (to seperate) is weak: scheidde, gescheiden. Its ancestor ODu *skeidan < PWGm *skaiþan < PGm *skaiþana is ...
Raymond Uppelschoten's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
91 views

Categorisation of verbs [closed]

I am confused about verbs. Have seen the following categorisation: Past Simple Past Perfect Past Continuous Past Perfect Continuous Past Subjunctive I understand that Past is a Tense. But what about ...
Raksh's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
257 views

About phrasal verbs, separable verb and verbs with adverbs

I was wondering about the concepts listed in the title. In one side we have the separable verbs in German, like mitkommen: Ich komme mit. On the other hand we have phrasal verbs such as think over ...
Ergative Man's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
110 views

What is the meaning of these verbal roots in The Concise Dictionary of Akkadian?

I am referring to this PDF or this HTML version of the "verbal roots" in The Concise Dictionary of Akkadian. The HTML site says of them pretty much the same thing: This index of Akkadian ...
Lance's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
213 views

What are the cognitive or linguistic reasons for separable prefixes?

I am struggling to understand why some languages (German for example) have verbs with separable prefixes and others don't. German has both kinds of prefixes: separable and non-separable. So, it's not ...
Pavel Voronin's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
99 views

What is a psych verb?

As mentioned in this comment by John Lawler to this question I asked yesterday, know is not a psych verb. What is a psych verb? I've heard this term before and vaguely guessed that it was a word ...
Greg Nisbet's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
85 views

By what mechanism do `want` and `know` fail to form commands?

Verbs like want and know seem to resist being used in imperative constructions. In particular, it does not seem possible to use them to command people to change their mind about what they want or to ...
Greg Nisbet's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
90 views

Are auxiliaries not lexical?

Anderson's Essentials of Linguistics says: Auxiliaries are what you might have called “helping verbs” when you first learned about grammar: they help a lexical verb by providing grammatical ...
Tim's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
217 views

Simplicity of the verb in Germanic languages

English and German have only two tenses (the present and the past) that are formed by inflection, all the others are formed using helping verbs, as is the conditional mood. In the Romance languages ...
Neandertal's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
639 views

Are there languages without non-finite verb forms at all?

This is inspired by the comments to this answer: Are there languages without any non-finite verb forms, or almost without any non-finite verb forms? Examples of such languages are welcome!
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
62 views

Which aspect is actually communicated by Supine verb form in Estonian

there is one bit of Estonian grammar that bugs me in particular for years already. Why to have 2 separate infinitive forms (so called, -ma and -da infinitives, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
62mkv's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
131 views

What do Georgian thematic suffixes even do, and where do they come from?

Georgian has two sets of verb affixes that don't really mark a specific tense or aspect themselves, but the combination of them narrows down which TAM-indicating conjugation you're looking at - the ...
Arcaeca's user avatar
  • 354
11 votes
1 answer
2k views

Stable words in the Indo-European language family

(I am not a linguist, so I don't know proper terminology) When studying Spanish and French, I quickly learned that many very common verbs have irregular forms; the reason given was that common usage ...
Arcanus's user avatar
  • 251
3 votes
2 answers
777 views

Using 'is' after non-denoting phrases

Usually 'is' can be an identity statement 'John is my boss' or a predication like 'John is angry', how about using 'is' for something that refers to no particular idea or object? For example 'a ...
Confused's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
78 views

Derivation of Morpheme for "Raising" in NACLO Problem

The Problem The Solution Partial Explanation chak appears in both (11) and (12), both of which are about catching. It doesn't appear anywhere else, so we can assume it is some form of "catching&...
MeltedStatementRecognizing's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
67 views

Can clauses with transitive verbs that stand for experiences be passivized across the attested languages that have passive voice?

In English, verbs that stand for experiences (e.g. see, hear, sense, notice, realize) can occur in passive forms and clauses as we see in these examples: "Tommy sees the baby sloth." --&...
James Grossmann's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
69 views

What is a "direction prefix" in this context?

In this book there's a translation of a Sumerian word, namely munintuma'a, which is said to mean "when he had made it suitable for her…". Then this sketch follows: ┌─────────┐ ┌─────┐ ┌─────┐...
Enlico's user avatar
  • 183
2 votes
3 answers
164 views

What is the benefit of tenses when time period can be pinned down by adverbs? [closed]

In language like English and German, there is two ways to indicate time period. One is with conjugation and the other with time adverbs. To my understanding, the adverbs allow for exact pinning down ...
Babu's user avatar
  • 433
1 vote
2 answers
184 views

Can non-finite verbs be not active nor passive voice?

Non-finite verbs can show voices as finite verbs do, but in some cases they seems to be without subject, so what are their voices? Are they just not showing voices? For example, “this was my first ...
Mela Liu's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
111 views

What type of verbs take a clause as the direct object?

We have detailed transitivity classification for the valence and the number of objects a verb can take. Some transitive verbs can take a complete sentence (a clause) as the direct object. For example, ...
Googlebot's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
33 views

How do "transform into" and "turn into" function syntactically?

He turned into a car He transformed into a car What are the syntactic categories of "transform", "turn", and "into" in each sentence? I think that "turned into&...
minseong's user avatar
  • 1,259
0 votes
1 answer
335 views

How do languages without adjectives, that treat them instead as verbs, handle more complex adjective-like phrases?

I am looking at papers like Where have all the adjectives gone? The case of Jinghpaw which show stuff like: fi=go ggba=thinn re. 3sg=TOP be.big=SUPER COP 'He is the biggest.' Also, Approaches to the ...
Lance's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
68 views

How does Case work in an impersonal sentence?

The Case filter is what prohibits the phonetic realization of a DP that recieves no grammatical Case. In languages such as Portuguese, people use impersonal constructions like "há/tem um carro na ...
Ergative Man's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
104 views

What languages use a conceptual parallel to the Hebrew verb ירש?

The Hebrew verb ירש is loosely translated to mean "inherit," but does not quite mean the same thing as the English word inherit because the Hebrew verb refers to an heir inheriting his ...
Reb Chaim HaQoton's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
66 views

Is there a specific verb category for verbs that act on other verbs

In the phrases below: He started to eat food John decided to kick the ball Justin prepared to face the challenge Are the verbs started, decided, and prepared in s special category since they don't ...
George Sechu's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
116 views

Is telicity a property of verbs or predicates?

In English, the verb "walk" is atelic. One could in principle walk indefinitely. Fatigue and aging limit the activity, but that fact is not an inherent part of the meaning of the verb. ...
James Grossmann's user avatar
7 votes
3 answers
744 views

Are there any languages where verbs in the past form are used with the future tense?

I have learned that in the Galician Ukrainian dialect the verbs in past tense are used in the future. Are there any other languages with the same structure? For example: "Будеш з нами їв?" = ...
Kurovsky's user avatar
  • 173
2 votes
1 answer
112 views

Is there a list of common English verbs with all of the inflectional "principal parts"?

I am looking for a list of common English verbs (1000 to 2000 most-frequent) which gives the distinct inflectional forms (spelled: pronunciation is irrelevant). For example, "sits, sit, sat, sat, ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
44 views

Is there "adjunct indexation" in some languages?

The arguments of a verb may leave markers on the verb about the person and number features, which is commonly called as argument indexation. We know the distinction between arguments and adjuncts is ...
jywu's user avatar
  • 159
-1 votes
2 answers
154 views

List of Lexical and Auxiliary verbs [closed]

I am wanting to know if anyone knows where I get a list of the verbs that are Lexical and Auxiliary. Not what the differences are, but what the actual verbs are. And maybe which are which. I've tried ...
Dora Anderson's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
84 views

Is there a word for a pair of verbs that mean the same thing but with subject and object swapped?

In logic, you can say: (A and B) --> A / 'A and B' implies 'A' (as the 'B' is just discarded) Computer programmers working from a specification to an implementation, sometimes talk about ...
tangentstorm's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
60 views

Why is a verb omitted in English coordination?

In English coordination, it is very common that a verb should be omitted so that the whole expression sounds natural as exemplifed below. Ann came with, and Bob without, a date. (Langacker 2012). ...
Max's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
42 views

What is the subcategorizarion of the verb "thought"?

I'm writing a grammar and I see that VP->thought SBAR. The sentence "the president thought that a sandwich sighed ." In the stanford parser. But what is this type of verbs? Transitive/...
Bob's user avatar
  • 31
2 votes
0 answers
63 views

Verb subcategoriztion - intransitive, transitive, ditransitive, Verb with a complement clause

I'm trying to avoid building grammatically incorrect sentences in some small toy grammar I'm building. I find subcategorization of verbs bit confusing. Can there be more then one classification per ...
Bob's user avatar
  • 31
3 votes
0 answers
43 views

Object of certain constructions

I am sure you have all come across constructions such as these: She slept a long sleep He lived a productive life. These verbs are traditionally intransitive verbs, and yet here are transitive. ...
Eric's user avatar
  • 305
1 vote
0 answers
251 views

OVS in English dialogue

English is an SVO language. When writing dialogue, especially in literature, writing a sentence with the speech first is considered grammatically correct. Take for example this extract from Ursula K ...
tai's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
90 views

Is it possible to make a statement without involving time?

All verbs seem to assume time. Is, was, will be, etc. I don't mean specific times, but the concept of time in general. Is it possible to make any statement without involving time?
Mac's user avatar
  • 11
3 votes
1 answer
81 views

How would you classify a verb that denotes a close temporal relation to another verb?

I am looking at a Papuan language that uses a serialized verb to denote temporal proximity to the main verb's occurrence. I am translating it as "just" in English, as in "he just left&...
Mia's user avatar
  • 51
21 votes
3 answers
2k views

What is the proper definition of a verb?

I do apologise if the question is wordy, but I feel some context is required for me to stand any chance of finding a satifactory answer. I have been struggling to understand why the word "is"...
user3273084's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
215 views

What percentage of verbs in English take both a direct and an indirect object?

I am assuming that the number of transitive verbs that take both a direct and indirect object in English is a subset of those that just take just a direct object. Does anyone know how much smaller? ...
LISA's user avatar
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