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Questions tagged [vowels]

Those speech sounds made with open, unrestricted vocal tracts, in contrast to consonants.

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Gulf Arabic vowels allophones

No matter how much I browse, I cannot find any true researcher's really precise and accurate data on the issue. Actually, I cannot find any Gulf Arabic Phonology compendium, so any help will be ...
GJC's user avatar
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Why does Danish have more short-long vowel pairs than Swedish?

In Danish, the pair /ø/ and /ø:/ are distinguished from the pair /œ/ and /œ:/. In Swedish, the phonemes /ø:/ and /œ/ are treated as a short-long pair. In Danish, the pair /ɔ/ and /ɔ:/ are ...
Quinali Solaji's user avatar
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What's the geographic distribution of the father/bra split in American English?

In most American English dialects with the father/bother merger, the bother vowel (originally /ɔ/) unrounds, lowers, and merges into the father vowel (originally /ɑ/), with the end result being /ɑ/, ...
Vikki's user avatar
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What are the best ways to learn to distinguish vowels?

Apologies if this question is redundant. It seems pretty basic, but I couldn't find a post that seemed relevant. If there is one, please forward it! My question is "What are the most effective ...
An Amateurish Linguist's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
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Does California vowel shift occur in bilingual Spanish speakers?

I know that recently there has been a lot of research done on the California vowel shift being a key part of a California accent for younger kids who have grown up there. Knowing that there is a ...
user28146's user avatar
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1k views

Does pre-fortis clipping only operate within a syllable? If not, what is its actual scope?

English is known to have a phenomenon of "pre-fortis clipping": in certain contexts, vowel and sonorant phonemes before a fortis/voiceless consonant are realized with shorter duration than the same ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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How many different vowels can be reliable annotated?

This question is similar to How many different vowels are there? but with a different twist: here I am not interested in the minimal difference between two vowels that can be heard, but in reliable ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
3 votes
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113 views

Why Do Singers Prefer Back Vowel Non-Lexical Vocables?

Singers more often sing "oohs" than they do "eehs". Why is that? It's exemplified in this article: https://qz.com/767812/millennial-whoop/ . I've listened to a fair amount of 50's, 60's, and 70's ...
jamiestroud69's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
464 views

Seeking Lao minimal pairs for /ɯ/ vs /ɤ/ vs /ɯː/ vs /ɤː/

In learning Lao one of the tricky things For a native English speaker is the two vowels that we don't have in English and sound very similar to us. This is compounded by the fact that both exist in ...
hippietrail's user avatar
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Are there any rules governing the variation between codaic /n/ and nasal vowels in Hindustani?

Are there any rules governing when a vowel + /n/ combination in Hindustani will become a nasal vowel, or are they completely separate and unpredictable? If so, are there any minimal pairs to prove so? ...
Quintus Caesius - RM's user avatar
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How did Otto Jespersen figure out the Great Vowel Shift?

How did Otto Jespersen figure out the Great Vowel Shift? Surely, there were no pronunciation audio recordings available. How did he know how British people had pronounced vowels centuries ago? Have ...
Youngsub Yoon's user avatar
2 votes
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686 views

A language without consonants

I know that Rotokas language has fewer consonants than most (all?) languages. But I haven't been able to find a language that has no consonants (whether phonemic or phonetic). Does such a language ...
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How much of a difference does vowel mergers make to perception of fluency?

Listening to some example French conversations between an experienced, fluent speaker and an inexperienced learner, I noticed by chance that the experienced speaker differentiates between similar ...
TheEnvironmentalist's user avatar
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Was Latin A Nasalized Language?

Thinking about it, most of the Romance languages I have heard nasalize vowels quite frequently and it seems consistent: that has me wondering, is there any evidence to show that Latin was a heavily-...
Matthew T. Scarbrough's user avatar
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71 views

Computational production of diphthongs

I am trying to generate vowels on MATLAB by using source-filter model. In case of monophthongs I'm using Rosenberg pulse as my source signal and then this source signal is convoluted with sounds ...
May Rest in Peace's user avatar
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Cot-Caught Merger in NYC and New Jersey?

I'm a bit confused with the cot-caught and father-bother merger, especially as they appear in the NYC / New Jersey area? I'm a native of the area and have lived there my whole life, yet I have the ...
Max Scialabba's user avatar
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When are Shva and Qhataf-Pataqh used in Biblical Hebrew?

In Tiberian Hebrew, Shva Na and Hataf Patach were both pronounced like Hataf Patach. (I will be discussing Shva Na, not Shva Nach, in this question.) However, in other dialects, Shva was pronounced ...
QwertyCTRL.'s user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
74 views

Why are mid-open/open vowels considered [- tense]?

I found the following chart (which was taken from Donegan (1976)) on a book and something reminded me of a simple question I always had, but I never came across a definitive answer: why are some open ...
Ergative Man's user avatar
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Terminology about elongating a monothong or a diphthong by duration and tone

Which terminology is applicable when a monothong or diphthong is elongated in duration and with a slightly higher pitch? Would it be vowel breaking or fracturing or something else? Example 1 (...
Peter Pierre Liu's user avatar
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Can regional variations of a language cause the formant space to be reduced?

I'm doing research on speech, but I'm not a linguist. Hopefully it won't be a silly question. I have been reading a little on regional variations of formants, because in my research we use formant ...
Karol's user avatar
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The Word for 'Ball' Pre-Colonisation

What I've found is that word-final /a/ in native Malay words and words up to the time of the Portuguese invasion (16-17th century) undergo reduction, e.g.: /a/ → [ə] / __# Mata (eye) - [matə] Kura-...
Morphosyntax's user avatar
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Matching Textgrid transcript to sound in Praat

I'm measuring the vowels in a whole boatload of recordings of the same item (e.g. 100 recordings of different people saying "my dog") in Praat. I am not very experienced in Praat, but figured out how ...
patrick's user avatar
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Can someone tell me the differences between the vowel system in Canadian English and the one in General American?

I am interested in knowing what are the vowels found in Canadian English, more particularly in Toronto and Montreal. I know that the low back merger occurred where both /ɔ/ and /ɒ/ merged into /ɑ/ in ...
Melanie's user avatar
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Praat for detecting not single vowels but vocals in a word

So. I've started using this powerfull (though inconvenient) piece of software Praat. And when i try to measure my own vocals formants of single vowels and these of native speakers (spanish) we all hit ...
user2881's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
196 views

When a vowel is nasalized does it effect on how open/close + front/back it would be?

I'm trying to generalize what environments a certain set of phonemes occur, but I'm not sure if nasalization would affect where the vowel would be on the IPA vowel chart. I think my analysis of the ...
user2696's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
92 views

Lip rounding doesn't transform the close-mid back vowels into each other, so why is the only difference between their names roundedness?

I don't understand why ⟨o⟩ is called the "close-mid back rounded vowel" while ⟨ɤ⟩ is called the "close-mid back unrounded vowel" - they sound completely different and they feel ...
Xiang Yu's user avatar
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0 answers
71 views

I have been reconstructing Austro-Thai but the vowels are inconsistent

I have been reconstructing Austro-Thai believing it to be a rather easy undertaking and it mostly was, the consonants between the two language families line up rather well only with occasional ...
that touhou nerd's user avatar
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94 views

Is there an android app that adds short vowels to Persian texts?

I found an app for Arabic. But is there an app or maybe a website for Persian too?
syximak's user avatar
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137 views

Why is it believed the West Germanic /i/ became /aɪ/ in some cases?

I am no study of linguistics, it is an hobby, so certainly nothing I know about in depth, but this one I do find puzzling. I understand that sometimes sounds change, this happens in English today due ...
Matthew T. Scarbrough's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
88 views

Praat: Sound analysis

In Praat after converting stereo sound to mono, the intensity reduced to (-ve) so no sound is produced although the original stereo sound has a max intensity 70 dB !
Salma Ayman's user avatar
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0 answers
394 views

Phonemic inventory of Supraregional Irish English vs. RP - vowel in FACE

Here's a question about English accent comparison. It's about the differences in phonemic inventory of Irish Supraregional compared to RP. Is the Irish English vowel in the lexical set FACE /e:/ a ...
koh-i-noor's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
33 views

Terminologies in Acoustic-phonetic Vowel classifier

An acoustic-phonetic vowel classifier uses a tree based classification. Consider F1 and F2 as formant frequencies. At it's first step, it checks for COMPACT/DIFFUSE (High F1/Low F1). At the second, it ...
Anantha Krishnan's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
79 views

Has a sound change ever happened that voiced only stops in between vowels and not fricatives?

Has this ever happened? Can it happen? I'm a novice in linguistics and I'm trying to study sound changes.
Sarāntairi's user avatar