Questions tagged [vowels]

Those speech sounds made with open, unrestricted vocal tracts, in contrast to consonants.

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3
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0answers
88 views

How many different vowels can be reliable annotated?

This question is similar to How many different vowels are there? but with a different twist: here I am not interested in the minimal difference between two vowels that can be heard, but in reliable ...
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1answer
201 views

Is there a universal basis for consonants vs vowels?

Is this unique to certain families of language or all verbal human language?
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330 views

How many different vowels are there?

There are generally accepted estimates on how many shades of grey (far less than 50!) or how many colours the human eye can distinguish. How many different vowels can the human ear distinguish? To ...
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2answers
1k views

Are there any minimal pairs for German lax/tense vowels?

As we know, most German vowels have a 'tense' (or long) pronunciation and a 'lax' (or short) pronunciation. Most of the time, which pronunciation should be used can be determined by the context that ...
2
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1answer
537 views

What were the Proto-Bantu -ATR vowels?

It seems to be widely accepted that Proto-Niger-Congo had ten vowels, with ATR harmony: /i-ɪ e-ɛ ə-a o-ɔ u-ʊ/. Similarly, it seems widely accepted that Proto-Bantu lost three of these vowels and ...
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1answer
483 views

When plotting vowel space, why does using F2-F1 better resemble the idealized vowel chart than using F1?

When plotting the chart of the acoustic space of AmE vowels, we can represent F1 values on the y-axis and F2 values on the x-axis, like a chart on the page Formant Frequencies. Alternatively, we can ...
2
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1answer
208 views

Why do most Austronesian and Polynesian languages have low consonant vowel ratio?

Refer: WALS feature 3A A simple Google search yielded - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5529419/ which could be one of the reasons. But can anyone come up with some other reasons maybe ...
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2answers
71 views

Can a single vowel (or consonant) be pronounced in multiple ways (different place/manner of articulation)

I recall from my undergrad Phonetics course (many years ago), the professor was talking about the limitations of describing phonemes by place and manner of articulation. I seem to remember an example ...
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1answer
110 views

Has the letter ⟨u⟩ in english ever historically represented the phonemes /y/ or /ʏ/?

English's spelling was changed after sometime and became more like French in some areas, such as the digraph ⟨ou⟩ to represent /u/, after ⟨u⟩ came to represent /ʊ~ʌ/. The reason I ask this, however, ...
3
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1answer
125 views

Why is the second formant plotted as F2-F1 in vowel space plots?

In a speech and audio processing class the lecturer pointed out that the vowel space is indicated by F1 plotted against F2-F1. I have searched online, and most sources I've found (including this ...
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3answers
351 views

Why are languages with average vowel inventory size scattered?

Is it true that languages with average vowel inventory size (5-6 Vs) are most widely scattered? How can this be explained?
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3answers
233 views

sonority hierarchy within vowel backness

Regarding the horizontal axis, and within the same high, I'd like to know whether back vowels (e.g. /ɤ/) are more sonorous than front ones (e.g. /e/).
3
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1answer
130 views

Tone associated to segments other than vowels

Are there languages in which lexical tone can associate to semivowels or glottal stops, or does tone ALWAYS associate only to vowels when it is realized in a spoken word?
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3answers
3k views

Is it possible for a word-initial vowel to not have a glottal stop before it?

I am not understanding how a word can begin with a glottal stop? Is it a glottal plosive? I guess I am trying not to outright ask why is it not called a glottal plosive. When I say some words that ...
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1answer
106 views

Most Distinguishable Monophthongs/Vowels?

I was listening to the 8 Primary Cardinal Vowels and 10 Secondary Cardinal Vowels. I found the Front Vowels easier to distinguish than the Back Vowels. If I were to pick the 8 most distinguishable ...
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37 views

Can regional variations of a language cause the formant space to be reduced?

I'm doing research on speech, but I'm not a linguist. Hopefully it won't be a silly question. I have been reading a little on regional variations of formants, because in my research we use formant ...
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0answers
50 views

How much of a difference does vowel mergers make to perception of fluency?

Listening to some example French conversations between an experienced, fluent speaker and an inexperienced learner, I noticed by chance that the experienced speaker differentiates between similar ...
3
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0answers
83 views

Why Do Singers Prefer Back Vowel Non-Lexical Vocables?

Singers more often sing "oohs" than they do "eehs". Why is that? It's exemplified in this article: https://qz.com/767812/millennial-whoop/ . I've listened to a fair amount of 50's, 60's, and 70's ...
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122 views

Why is it believed the West Germanic /i/ became /aɪ/ in some cases?

I am no study of linguistics, it is an hobby, so certainly nothing I know about in depth, but this one I do find puzzling. I understand that sometimes sounds change, this happens in English today due ...
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3answers
2k views

Anunasika(Chandrabindu) in Vowels (Sanskrit)

Someone said Anunasika is like trying to say something entirely in nasal voice. So let’s say I want to pronounce a vowel ‘U’kara with Chandrabindu on top of it. I know it’s should be completely a ...
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0answers
159 views

Was Latin A Nasalized Language?

Thinking about it, most of the Romance languages I have heard nasalize vowels quite frequently and it seems consistent: that has me wondering, is there any evidence to show that Latin was a heavily-...
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3answers
571 views

Does regular vowel dissimilation/disharmony exist?

Vowel harmony and Umlaut are widely attested, whereby vowels are affected by other vowels in the sense of making them closer in features to other vowels in the same word. Is there a comparable ...
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2answers
399 views

Why hebrew אמא pronounciation vary from the logic of אבא pronouciation?

Why does the pronunciation of 'ABA' ( אבא ) is straightforward, while the pronunciation of 'IMA' ( אמא ) is not ? Shouldn't it be pronunciated 'AMA' instead of 'IMA' ?
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2answers
829 views

What is the phonetic and phonemic destinction between a semivowel and a vowel?

I have read several articles that claim that phonemically, /j/ and /i/ are the same and distinguished from each other by being syllabic or not. What confuses me is that I can hear the difference ...
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73 views

The Word for 'Ball' Pre-Colonisation

What I've found is that word-final /a/ in native Malay words and words up to the time of the Portuguese invasion (16-17th century) undergo reduction, e.g.: /a/ → [ə] / __# Mata (eye) - [matə] Kura-...
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1answer
185 views

Text-to-speech for arbitrary vowels (i.e not just ipa)

So my understanding is vowel sounds can be modelled in a 2-d space together with roundedness in terms of location and openness or equivalently in terms of first and second formants. You get pictures ...
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1answer
44 views

Does Neary Vowel Normalization account for Vocal Tract Length? [closed]

Can't quite find this in the research I have done so far that surveys various vowel normalization methods...
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0answers
75 views

Praat: Sound analysis

In Praat after converting stereo sound to mono, the intensity reduced to (-ve) so no sound is produced although the original stereo sound has a max intensity 70 dB !
2
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3answers
590 views

What's up with the letter W?

English is an interesting and incestuous mangling of stuff. I sometimes think about W and it is a pretty interesting letter with much mystery and intrigue. In French, oui begins with a W sound, yet ...
3
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2answers
954 views

Is there a rounded /æ/? Is there a Near-open front rounded vowel?

Okay, so I was just doing a bit of conlanging, and I was coming up with a verb ending /æɸ/. Because of the way I have begun this, /ɸ~ʍ/ are interchangeable. When I first tried saying /æʍ]/ I ...
2
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1answer
500 views

cut middle portion of the vowel using praat script

I have several speech files. In each file a vowel is annotated. I want to cut the half portion of this vowel and save it in another file. In order to do this, I am cutting the vowel in 4 parts. Then I ...
4
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1answer
110 views

Term for consonant elision

What's the name for the elision of a consonant between two vowels? Syncope is usually used for vowel elision (resulting in consonant clusters) but what about consonant elision? I couldn't find any ...
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1answer
686 views

Swahili stress with two vowels in a row, how does it work?

I'm uncertain how stress works with two vowels in a row, so I used a regex to grab some words out of a small learner's-dictionary, and then make the two possible stress-patterns after each entry, ...
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0answers
289 views

Matching Textgrid transcript to sound in Praat

I'm measuring the vowels in a whole boatload of recordings of the same item (e.g. 100 recordings of different people saying "my dog") in Praat. I am not very experienced in Praat, but figured out how ...
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1answer
395 views

Vowel Shift and Affixes

It is well known that morphology influences phonology to a certain extent. This can be seen with how vowels that should shift do not shift when the words are affixed by certain morphemes. Some affixes ...
5
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2answers
674 views

Can a vowel be a consonant?

So, I know there are certain consonants in the IPA that have vowel-like properties, and can therefor be used as vowels, such as [n], [m], and [l]. Examples include [pnt], or [ʒlf]. So, in the loosest ...
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1answer
1k views

Where can I find a vowel analyzer app or program?

I'm looking for a smartphone app or computer program that will listen to me pronouncing a vowel and will tell me where exactly the vowel is located in the IPA vowel chart. Does anyone know of apps or ...
2
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0answers
63 views

Computational production of diphthongs

I am trying to generate vowels on MATLAB by using source-filter model. In case of monophthongs I'm using Rosenberg pulse as my source signal and then this source signal is convoluted with sounds ...
2
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1answer
544 views

How to Transcribe R-colored Vowels (ɝ, ɚ, ɑ˞,ɔ˞) in X-SAMPA?

I'm looking at the Arpabet page on Wikipedia, and note some entries like this: Arpabet | IPA | Word Examples ER | ɝ | her (HH ER0); bird (B ER1 D); hurt (HH ER1 T), nurse (N ER1 S) Now, I'm ...
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1answer
777 views

Sound correspondences in Germanic languages

I've noticed that in particular germanic languages have similar base words to english of which many times the only difference is that of the vowels. This would make sense seing as to how they are ...
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1answer
527 views

So, if we fix our mouth & tongue in a particular position then we can make ONE & ONLY ONE distinct vowel sound right?

Ok see the following IPA vowel chart Let say to make the long /i/ sound then the front of the tongue need to be as front as possible in the mouth and as close as possible to the roof of the mouth. ...
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5answers
2k views

Are sound changes regular?

Are sound changes regular now or not? I mean it seems to me that it's accepted that sound change is pretty regular, because of how sound changes are treated in etymology/historical linguistics. I even ...
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0answers
258 views

Phonemic inventory of Supraregional Irish English vs. RP - vowel in FACE

Here's a question about English accent comparison. It's about the differences in phonemic inventory of Irish Supraregional compared to RP. Is the Irish English vowel in the lexical set FACE /e:/ a ...
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2answers
495 views

Given a vowel system, how do I find the tendencies and universals that are manifested with it?

Suppose I am given a vowel system (for example, 'i', 'upside down and then flipped e', 'a' and 'u'). How do I figure out the tendencies and universals manifested in the vowel system? Based on my ...
2
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1answer
193 views

Are Lana's “Yup!”s triphthongs?

At some point in the Archer series, Lana starts saying very emphatic Yup!s. I was recently wondering about triphthongs and whether they occur in English, and found the Wikipedia entry had only a few ...
5
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1answer
452 views

What phonological process changes е to ё in Russian?

I've been studying Russian for years now, but the one thing that I can't seem to wrap my mind around is why would the sound е je come to be pronounced like ё jo in certain circumstances? Obviously, ...
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1answer
120 views

Formants in Praat Exercises

How do I measure formants in a Praat graph or diagram? is there any way to calcualate formant frequency?
2
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1answer
152 views

Is there a language with phonemic distinction of voicing within vowels?

Just as in the topic. It seems unlikely to me, I could not find anything about this on wals.info but nonetheless it seems theoretically possible since articulating vowels without voicing is doable. ...
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2answers
2k views

Could you tell which pictures, which depict how the vowel chart is positioned inside our mouth, are accurate?

Ok, we all know that the vowel chart diagram is drawn like this Wikipedia Ok, that is the model, but how the vowel chart is positioned inside our mouth or how the tongue in the reality is placed ...
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2answers
216 views

Tackling cross-linguistic vowel markedness system[at]ically: features or what?

I have been trying to find alternative ways of representing vowel phonemes for cross-linguistic comparisons in a unified, systematic way that would also reveal their relative (un)markedness. At the ...