Questions tagged [welsh]

Welsh is a p-Celtic language spoken in Wales and the Patagonia region of Argentina.

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1answer
55 views

How were this feminine mutations originated in Welsh?

It is known that the celtic languages have mutations, for instance: Welsh: *transcription depicts North Welsh dialects • normal form: Cymru [ˈkəmrɨ̞] (Wales); • soft mutation: Gymru [ˈɡəmrɨ̞] (ex.:...
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0answers
28 views

How to convert CHAT to TextGrid in a batch?

Siarad corpus is a corpus of spoken Welsh (~40 hours, all transcribed, glossed and translated!). I want to analyze some conversations using Praat. Praat uses the TextGrid format, but the Siarad corpus ...
4
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1answer
450 views

Are Latin “virīlis”, Punjabi “vīr”, Old Irish “fer” , Wels “gwr” and Hindi “var” related?

Are all the words above from the same root (PIE)? Or are these a bunch of false cognates like behtar (Farsi) better (English).
2
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1answer
633 views

The Inflectional Phrase and Welsh

Wikipedia explains how the Inflectional Phrase has a VP as its complement and an NP (the subject of the phrase) as its specifier. It is long ago that I studied this, but a quick look at Sprachliches ...
3
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1answer
131 views

Brythonic w-y? Place name etymology

I'm very interested in the old Brythonic languages and their survival in northern England into the second millenium AD. Up until the last century you still saw a few word snippets in common use, for ...
6
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1answer
140 views

c- in Irish clann “offspring”

Irish clann "plant; offspring; child" (the source of English clan) is borrowed from Welsh plant with the same meanings, which is itself a borrowing of Latin planta. Why did Irish change the initial p ...
0
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1answer
114 views

Why does *h* have two different names in Welsh?

Why does h have two different names in Welsh, namely âets and hâ (variants: ha, he, hi, hy)? And what other examples are there of letters known in a language under two or more names for the same ...
2
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3answers
1k views

What kind of pluralisation system does Welsh use?

Many nouns in Welsh have a the plural form that is shorter than the singular form (i.e. the singular form looks like the plural form + affix). For example: Singular coeden 'tree' seren 'star' ...
4
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2answers
976 views

Where is Welsh on the analytic/synthetic spectrum?

I believe it's traditionally been held to be more on the synthetic side of the spectrum, but why? Are there any quantitative analyses to back this up?