All Questions

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Glagolitic Ⰾ (l) is like Ⰴ (d). Is it related to Latin / Old Latin l / d lingua dingua, lacrima dacrima?

Glagolitic Ⰾ (l) is like Ⰴ (d). Is it related to Latin / Old Latin l / d lingua dingua, lacrima dacrima?
-1
votes
2answers
91 views

What exactly is a “garden path” sentence?

Is there a term for this type of ambiguous sentence? I think it's called a "Garden Path sentence"? Coastal Bank breached its loan commitment to the owner and the contractor threatened to ...
5
votes
2answers
318 views

How widespread across language families is the root, krt, meaning cut/short?

How widespread across language families is the root, krt, meaning cut/short? This root is prevalent across the Indo-European and Semitic language families. It may have spread across languages like ...
-1
votes
1answer
71 views

Is the word “Language” in “Natural Language Processing” plural or singular, count or mass? [closed]

I want to translate the word language in the term NLP to the Arabic language. so I wonder, In Natural Language Processing, if the word language is countable or uncountable? whether it is plural or ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

What algorithms can associate words together from texts?

What algorithms can associate words together from texts? I was wondering how this can be achieved. Thanks.
0
votes
0answers
19 views

What word describes the unique possibilities when disambiguating a word?

The disambiguation page for the word turtle on wikipedia displays a list of possibilities to choose from. Many of these possibilities are just the same word turtle but with different meanings. ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Is there a term for a question that is not rhetorical?

Oxford Dictionary defines a "rhetorical question" as one "asked in order to produce an effect or to make a statement rather than to elicit information". Is there not a term for a '...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

Introduction to compositional semantics with types

I'm looking for an introduction (book or lecture notes) to compositional semantics based on e-t type theory that would be suitable for first-year level linguistics presupposing knowledge of elementary ...
3
votes
2answers
293 views

/ðæs saɪd/ versus /ɡʊb bɔɪ/ - Assimilation of place versus manner

Good day I am facing a problem to distinguish between assimilation of place and assimilation of manner So in Peter R's book he said that (AOM) is much less noticeable, and he provided examples which ...
1
vote
0answers
70 views

Verb-ing after this phrase or clause “this is my first time”

Is the verb with '-ing' in the phrase or clause "this is my first time eating this" a gerund or a present participle verb? I think now I see that "this" probably is or means "...
4
votes
0answers
36 views

Where can I find a table/list of all/many languages' plural/singular forms for hours/time?

Even though I'm natively Swedish, I'm seriously unsure if it's "1,1 timme" or "1,1 timmar". That is, what in English would be "1.1 hour" or "1.1 hours". Even as ...
0
votes
2answers
89 views

Proto-Uralic *kämä vs Akkadian kamūnu

The English Wikipedia article for "cumin" mentions All of these ultimately derive from Akkadian 𒂵𒈬𒉡 (kamūnu). In Hungarian, caraway seeds are called köménymag, keménymag where the word &...
2
votes
0answers
106 views

How to read a spectrogram?

I read some materials online How to Read a Spectrogram, Reading Spectrograms: Consonants, Reading Spectrograms: Vowels. I still have no idea how to analyze a spectrogram. Could anyone explain with the ...
3
votes
0answers
78 views

How to write a syntax tree for 'should have been'? [closed]

the sentence is "Will they decide if you should have been promoted?". The T' and AuxP are already taken up by 'have' and 'been, where does should go?
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Method in deep learning with domain specific corpus for a text classification

I'm searching a method to classify a text (5 classes) with a little corpus and which is domain specific (in pharmaceutical area). I tried some models on python like random forest or multinomial naive ...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

How can we distinguish activity and semelfactive in terms of lexical aspect?

Since both of them are atelic, dynamic, not durative, then how to distinguish them?
1
vote
1answer
160 views

What causes a glottal stop after some silence before a vowel?

I recently asked a question Do we pronounce the vowel at the beginning of the word with a preceding glottal stop? on the English site and received a very good answer. According to the answer on that ...
6
votes
0answers
105 views

Just how silent is the French e muet?

I know the e muet is usually considered silent. That being said, it is still often pronounced in songs and poetry (famously, in the Marseillaise). This is completely contrary to the situation in ...
1
vote
2answers
99 views

What's the tense ambiguity of this sentence?

I'm reading Kearns(2011) and in Ch9, the author says the sentence "All Torah’s friends were rich then" is ambiguous in the possible scopes of tense and a quantifier NP. I know one meaning is ...
2
votes
1answer
63 views

Morpheme breakdown of the word 'classification'

For the word classification, would it break down to 'class-ify-ation' or 'class-ify-ic-ation'. I am confused between the two because for the second one, classific isn't a word.
3
votes
0answers
25 views

latex package gb4e: How to make the first line “running text”

I am writing a grammatical description of a language using the package gb4e to produce the interlinear glosses. The editor has asked that the first line of the gloss appear as running text, i.e. is ...
1
vote
0answers
79 views

What is the definition of a “case” in grammar?

Among others, according to Wikipedia: "Case" is a linguistics term regarding a manner of categorizing nouns, pronouns, adjectives, participles, and numerals according to their traditionally ...
0
votes
2answers
108 views

Etymology of “fiamma” in Italian [duplicate]

I don't speak Italian at all, but I was a bit surprised that the word "flame" in Italian is "fiamma" (IPA: /ˈfjam.ma/) (to compare with flamme in French, flamma in Latin and llama ...
0
votes
3answers
110 views

What's the discipline of creating languages called?

I can only assume creating languages is part of the linguistics field, but is there a more specific name for the field, or the process?
1
vote
0answers
59 views

Two questions about referential opacity

I'm self-studying Kearns(2011), and here are two tricky questions I'm really curious about. I asked my classmates but they failed to answer it too. We really don't know how the first sentence can have ...
4
votes
1answer
106 views

What is the reason for having irregular verbs?

Having irregular verbs makes the language more complex. Users have to memorize more rules. Is there a historical reason, or some other reason, that English had all these irregular verbs?
2
votes
0answers
38 views

Which (of the Germanic) languages support resultative constructions?

my question regards resultative constructions. Which of the Germanic languages supports resultative constructions? It would be awesome if you could suggest any literature regarding any language. ...
3
votes
1answer
80 views

Form versus orthography versus spelling

What is the proper linguistic term for the way a word is written? Initially, I used the term form, but then I was told that it was orthography. However, I sometimes come up with sources where the term ...
2
votes
1answer
88 views

Languages in which vowels predominate

I was thinking about the loss of hearing that can accompany aging, and how this loss can affect the ability to communicate verbally. Since the ability to distinguish consonants tend to diminish before ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

Are these generalized quantifiers correct?

According to Kearns (2011), I know that "the ten apples are bruised" can be interpreted as "‘The ten apples are bruised’ is true if and only if |A ∩ B| = 10." But how about this ...
3
votes
1answer
80 views

How order of the syntax tree is formally/strictly proven?

An example from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concrete_syntax_tree : tree of "John hit the ball." . The tree branches are joined in this order: {John {hit {the ball}}}. Ie, "the" ...
-1
votes
1answer
42 views

Deruny, deruni or deryni? [closed]

What is the correct spelling of potato pancakes, If we take the Russian or Ukrainian origin of the word? Deruny, deruni or deryni? A google search for the etymology says deryny And Wikipedia: Potato ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

Can tonal languages be understood when whispered? [duplicate]

I was wondering recently whether the tonal information is lost in tonal languages like Chinese, when it is whispered. Can Chinese still be understood when whispered?
2
votes
2answers
182 views

Conditional clauses, use of 'if, then, else' in major non-English languages?

Are there major languages in the world that construct conditional clauses differently than English? That is, the translation of "if" and associated words would not be direct due to different ...
0
votes
0answers
61 views

Arabic: A question on the so-called verbal noun

In Arabic, there is this concept of the maṣdar. For some time, I thought it was simply the verbal noun, then I realized—correct me if I am wrong—it is more than that. (As I am a complete beginner in ...
10
votes
3answers
224 views

Is it true that English speakers will only accept one of the 120 possible combinations of the 5 morphemes de-nation-al-ize-ation?

Dominique Sportiche, Hilda Koopman, and Edward Stabler [1] make the following claim about Affixation in section 2.3.2 of their Introduction to Syntactic Analysis and Theory: There are 5!=120 ...
2
votes
1answer
114 views

Arabic grammar: The difference between the terms raf` and marfu'

I have begun to learn Arabic, and the difference between following terms confuse me. There is this topic of ʾirāb—the science which deals with how the Arabic noun inflects with respect to its ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

Where do nominal sentences (null/lacking verb sentences) come from and what does their existence imply?

Nominal sentence is a grammatical feature of some languages that a grammatical correct sentence can have no explicit verb. The implicit verb at least in Arabic is simple present form of 'to be', e.g. ...
5
votes
1answer
103 views

The term for the state of a noun

In linguistics, a case is how a noun declines with respect to its grammatical function within a given phrase, clause, or sentence. Is there a linguistics term to refer to the “state” of a noun within ...
2
votes
0answers
42 views

What exactly is the Structure-Dependency Principle

Could someone explain what structure-dependency is in layman terms, and why it's so important? Resources I've found on the internet weren't of much help so I'm asking on here. Thanks!
-2
votes
1answer
99 views

(Ancient Greek) Dogs and Emptiness, κύων and κενόω, related?

I've been curious about the concepts of emptiness and dogs. I have independently been exploring these and there seem to be some theological/philosophical convergence between Joshua and Caleb from the ...
-1
votes
2answers
74 views

What can explain the appearance of “self-made” language features if neither of languages a person speaks or learns have similar features?

I know a woman, whose native language is Kyrgyz (Turkic family) and who learned Russian as an adult (mostly, maybe she was somewhat exposed to it before as well). What striked me is that she invented ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Is the variable involved in a linguistic change from above necessarily a 'stereotype'?

William Labov's (1971) concept of the 'stereotype' is that of a dialectal variable which has attracted sufficient attention to be the subject of overt comment or metapragmatic discussion. Such ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

Relationship between the complexity of text analysis and the dependency distance

According to (Liu, 2008), a text is more complex if it has longer dependency distance. Does this automatically mean that complex text analyses entail relating different words at a greater dependency ...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

Terminology about elongating a monothong or a diphthong by duration and tone

Which terminology is applicable when a monothong or diphthong is elongated in duration and with a slightly higher pitch? Would it be vowel breaking or fracturing or something else? Example 1 (...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

What is an “open” and a “closed” system of signs through semiotics' lens?

I'm new, and this is my first time asking a question here. While I was watching a video about semiotics, I heard the speaker (from the video) said “semiotics is the study of sings from systems of any ...
6
votes
0answers
103 views

Are the words “blue” and “red” universally linked to coldness and warmness in different languages?

We often talk about warm vs cold colors. When someone feels sad, we say she "feels blue". I conjecture this may be universal across cultures due to our experience with the warmness of the ...
2
votes
0answers
59 views

What are the essential words?

Take a dictionary. Each word is defined using other words. Take all the words of the dictionary. The words that appear in their definitions is a subset of words of this dictionary (and not the whole ...
3
votes
0answers
75 views

Germanic loanwords in Czech? The case of “lék” [duplicate]

Recently I started studying Czech and I learned the word "lék", pill/medicine and "lékař", doctor/physician. In Polish there is a similar one. They bear a superficial resemblance ...
2
votes
0answers
37 views

Adjunct vs complement with intransitive verb

Tony came from outside the traditional media Am I right in thinking because came is intransitive that "outside the traditional media" is an adjunct rather than a subject complement?

15 30 50 per page
1
3 4
5
6 7
176