All Questions

1,595 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
0answers
241 views

Is there a method for comparative morpheme analysis in historical aspect?

Is there a method for comparative morpheme analysis in historical aspect? To which degree is it accurate, if such a method exists? When, where and who did invent it?
0
votes
0answers
172 views

What does this juggling gesture usually mean?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=LyCwXLDr_-0#t=187s I notices not first time in chaotic context.. it seems people reproducing gesture have chaos
0
votes
0answers
73 views

Which layers of the language is dealing with co-reference resolution and how to solve it computationaly?

Which layers of the language is dealing with co-reference resolution and what are the steps to solve this problem in NLP?
0
votes
0answers
66 views

Is “I'm paraphrasing myself when I say this…” autological?

A friend of mine posted the following on his Facebook wall: I'm paraphrasing myself when I say this... I know this isn't a paradox, is it autological? Is it recursive? Is it even a true statement? ...
0
votes
0answers
628 views

Reciprocal vs Reflexive

In languages where the reflexive and reciprocal meaning is expressed with one single suffix, is the reciprocal considered a kind of reflexive suffix or is the reflexive a kind of reciprocal?
0
votes
1answer
116 views

What part of speech is a letter?

I wanted to know what part of speech a letter might be or I wanted to see if I understand letters. Do people ask this question in this place? Or am I in the place where people would ask this? I asked ...
0
votes
1answer
91 views

Is duck typing valid to identify parts of speech?

Let's say we're trying to identify a word or a phrase and on the surface it seems a bit strange and to not fit into an easily identified category/part of speech (POS). Is it valid to say "If it walks ...
0
votes
1answer
287 views

save all file in window objects praat

I have some files. wav in the object window, how can I save them automatically? I found this script but I get an error: directoryName$ = chooseDirectory$: "Choose a directory to save all the new ...
0
votes
1answer
103 views

From a systemic functional approach, what would a transitivity analysis of 'be that as it may' show?

I found this beautifully organized text for my students to analyze in terms of thematic progression. I'll also ask them to provide a transitivity analysis of some of its clauses, but there's that ...
0
votes
1answer
117 views

“As long as”, “So long as”, in logic (ambiguity?)

I'd love an expert opinion on how to interpret "as long as" and "so long as" when doing logic (specifically, whether it's considered a necessary or sufficient conditional indicator). Also, I'd ...
0
votes
1answer
87 views

Where would I go to find a hierarchical list of occupations in English?

I'd like to get an electronic list of occupations/professions/jobs in English, like "doctor," "cowboy," "assistant to the regional manager," etc. I can't quite find this in the WordNet hierarchy (...
0
votes
1answer
158 views

weak definite article in Engish linguistics

I may be wrong, but I don't seem to have come across the term 'weak definite article' in English linguistics though I think I've encountered it in German or French linguistics. (I've read 'weak ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Help with an ambiguous English syntax tree (studying for a final)

Sorry if this is the wrong stackexchange site for this question. I'm studying for a final for my english linguistics class and going through example sentences that we should be able to draw syntax ...
0
votes
1answer
102 views

“The meaning of words depends solely on mental concepts inside the human brain”

What does "the meaning of words depends solely on mental concepts inside the human brain" illustrate? An internalist or externalist position ? Brief reason why. Thanks !
0
votes
1answer
79 views

How can one describe the relation between concepts, nouns, verbs and other word classes

In Wikidata, we describe concepts (Q items) and lexemes (L items), where the lexemes may be nouns, verbs, adjectives, etc. It is usually straightforward to describe the relation from noun lexemes to ...
0
votes
2answers
142 views

Usage of pluperfect in English to talk about metaphysical possibility in the present

I hope that this is the right SE site to ask my question (as opposed to philosophy.SE and english.SE). I am interested in and know some logic, so I talk often with philosopher of language, even ...
0
votes
1answer
96 views

A question about connotation meaning and denotation meaning

Here is a word, "flightless" which means "(of a bird or an insect) naturally unable to fly". So should we say it refers to the word's denotation meaning or connotation meaning? ...
-1
votes
0answers
20 views

What is the definition of Phrase structure grammar ? is phrase structure grammar and context free grammar is the same thing?

Is phrase structure grammar is a subset of generative capacity ? and Transformational grammar is the same thing as generative grammar ? if not what difference ? I was searching everywhere but I still ...
-1
votes
0answers
47 views

Stress placement in several Turkic words

I am writing a paper on borrowing from Turkish and would like to confirm my hypothesis on regular adaptation of stress patterns. If you know Turkish, could you please indicate which syllable is ...
-1
votes
1answer
62 views

Has a sound change ever happened that voiced only stops in between vowels and not fricatives?

Has this ever happened? Can it happen? I'm a novice in linguistics and I'm trying to study sound changes.
-1
votes
1answer
34 views

adding an ouput line to an existing praat script

I am using an existing praat script for speech rate (Nivja de Jong and Ton Wempe, 2008) that outputs speech rate along with other variables in the Praat info window. It saves the files it uses compute ...
-1
votes
1answer
558 views

Is *grandmother* a compound?

"Grand is used in a specialized sense in kin terms like grandmother or grandson to indicate a further degree of lineal distance beyond that expressed in the head. Such forms can themselves be modified ...
-1
votes
1answer
149 views

You fought so bravely for it. [adjunct vs. complement]

You fought so bravely for it. In this sentence, the verb 'fought' is followed by two dependents: so bravely and for it. I thought that for it was a complement whereas so bravely was an adjunct. But ...
-1
votes
1answer
104 views

What are technical terms and treatments in the literature for the exactly the following special kind of pleonasm?

Question. What is an attested technical term for the following kind of pleonasm? Has this been described scientifically and where? What are other examples than the one I give below? Let N be a noun. ...
-1
votes
1answer
272 views

Why would sociolinguists want to study perceptual dialectology?

In other words, how would understanding non-linguists' (or the folks') beliefs about and attitudes towards language help us understand dialect diversity?
-1
votes
1answer
235 views

Wals chapter 3 consonant vowel ratio

hello I just do not understand how to calculate consonant-vowel ratio referring wals chapter 3! I need to calculate the consonant-vowel ratio regarding german french and turkish! Concerning the ...
-1
votes
1answer
363 views

How are brothers and sisters not KINDS of siblings?

Source: Understanding Semantics (2 ed, 2013) by Sebastian Löbner [p 217, Definition 9:] A set of expressions is a taxonomy if and only if: (i) they form a conceptual hierarchy in terms of ...
-1
votes
1answer
118 views

Relation between VOT and three way distinctions between plosives and affricates

I faced this puzzling Fill in the Blank which asks- VOT can make a three way differentiation among i.____________________ ii. ________________________ iii. _____________________plosives and fricatives....
-1
votes
1answer
588 views

What are the basic principles of optimality theory?

I'm trying to conduct research on the definiteness system (how is definiteness marked) in my dialect. I want to do this in the light of Optimality Theory (Prince and Smolensky) and am struggling to ...
-1
votes
2answers
117 views

Oldest words for the seasons for which we have a confirmed pronunciation?

I'm aware that this is possibly very difficult to answer. What are the oldest known words for the seasons (as major, multi-month divisions of the year) for which we have reasonable scholarly assurance ...
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

What features distinguish the true diphthongs of English?

How are the true diphthongs of English distinguished from each other and other vowels with traditional distinctive features theory?
-1
votes
1answer
290 views

acoustic features for english phonems

in this following paper , if we go to page no- 126 we will find a table with all acoustic features of all german Phonemes. http://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/luur/download?func=downloadFile&recordOId=...
-1
votes
2answers
2k views

Can anyone explain the difference between nominal and pronominal cases?

Like the title says, can anyone give an explanation on the difference between nominal and pronominal cases?
-1
votes
1answer
144 views

Extracting adjective phrase from a sentence

Could someone point me to some open source NLP or machine learning library that can be used (possibly with some additional processing) to extract an adjective phrase from a sentence? I.e, given the ...
-1
votes
1answer
2k views

how similar are Serbian and Polish?

how similar are Serbian and Polish? They are both Slavic languages so how similar are they? When i listen to them it sounds pretty similar
-1
votes
1answer
178 views

Does “Pictura Mentum” mean anything?

I know that the etymology of the word "pigment" is the Latin verb pingere (to paint) plus the suffix -mentum (instrument used in the accomplishment of the action). I know that the -mentum suffix is ...
-2
votes
0answers
32 views

Borrowing And Spread Of European Proverbs

Proverbs are easily spread from one language to another and are conveyed through linguistic communication paths. (Wikipedia, 2021) Meider considers four possible sources of common proverbs in European ...
-2
votes
1answer
119 views

Advanced book for English Phonology?

pals. Does anyone know any advanced book(s) in Phonology of English and could give me a title/the titles, please? I am studying English Philology (so English is my 2nd language) and we've just ...
-2
votes
1answer
167 views

Hand gesture - Patting

I apologize if the following question is off-topic on this site. Some time ago, I was sitting at a table in a cafeteria/canteen. A few tables away, I saw someone I knew. This person also saw me and ...
-2
votes
1answer
800 views

'today announced' vs. '*yesterday announced'

In my grammar, 'Uber today announced a new invention' sounds fine but 'Uber yesterday announced a new invention' is marked if not ungrammatical. Any literature on this/explanations?
-2
votes
1answer
73 views

For what reason is the term “part of sentence” not considered a linguistic standard?

Whenever I browse through a book on grammar teaching of a particular language, there is a good chance I'll encounter the term "part of sentence". Actually, I can not remember having peeked into such a ...
-2
votes
1answer
155 views

Why is ‘karma’ cognate with ‘Britain’?

The word karma has Sanskrit origin. It ultimately comes from the PIE root *kʷer- which means "to do or make". The word karma is cognate with Britain. I know what the word karma means (good or bad ...
-4
votes
0answers
71 views

Why didn't languages jettison inflections, which are unnecessary, earlier?

Both authors below affirm that languages ditched jettisons partly because inflections are unnecessary, and languages without inflections are simpler. This doesn't answer my question because it doesn't ...
-4
votes
1answer
36 views

Metonym Hyponym: nym relationship

is there a "nym" relationship between "Ford" and "car"?
-4
votes
1answer
68 views

The “plague” and its transmission by “fleas”, or “flies”

"fly", Ger "Fliege" (the insect drosophila) could theoretically reflect an earlier *plag. It is linked with "to fly" though, to nobody's surprise. Old English flȳġe, flēoge (“a fly”), from Proto-...

15 30 50 per page
1
28 29 30 31
32