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1answer
59 views

Looking for an alternative non-tonal “wholistic” original Pinyin font

I am looking for an alternative to the classical "romaji" Pinyin with diacritics, that has the following features: each symbol can be rotated about the square representing its centre, and the ...
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votes
1answer
115 views

What motivated the term 'Recursion'? [closed]

'Recursion' is defined on pp 90 and 107 in Syntax, A Generative Introduction (2012 3 ed) by Andrew Carnie. Does the meaning of its Latin etymon ('running back, return'), influence the meaning of '...
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votes
2answers
99 views

For arbitrary x: 'Predicate Constant'(x) vs ∃x ( 'Predicate Constant'(x) )

Source: p 348, Understanding Semantics (2 ed, 2013) by Sebastian Löbner We can now see why employment of an existential quantifier makes a big difference. Compare (31a) with the ‘naked’ (31b): ...
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votes
1answer
185 views

Does this name's pronunciation match the spelling? [closed]

I want to use a unique name as my personal, yet it's spelling is very unclear to me. The pronunciation is "E m ai l" As in- E-end, M-me, AI-lie, L-live. Emphasized as word "agile". Is it correct to ...
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votes
1answer
72 views

'treatment of the issues' and 'sensitivity to the problems': Why cannot these be Noun Phrases?

Source: p 178 Understanding Syntax (4 ed, 2014) by Prof. Maggie Tallerman PhD in Linguistics (U. Hull). The author is using (84) and (85) to introduce Bar Notation. In (84), admired has a ...
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1answer
95 views

How did 'of' absorb so many meanings?

[OED:] The primary sense was ‘away’, ‘away from’, a sense now obsolete, except in so far as it is retained under the spelling off (see off adv., prep., n.1, and adj.). All the existing uses of of are ...
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votes
1answer
901 views

IPA convert to English text [closed]

mænɪdʒ tʃaɪld rɪzʌlt pælɪs sku:l prəvaɪd detə sʒ:...
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votes
1answer
48 views

What separates events such as festivals and tournaments from other events such as running and partying? [closed]

Events are widely defined as things that happen. Actions can take place, but objects cannot, so it would be natural to assume that all events are actions. However, there are many things that we call ...
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1answer
44 views

Reearch paper subject [closed]

Computer language and human language. is it a good subject to research paper related to linguistics? Thank you in advance
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1answer
70 views

What are the dimensions along which English & Portuguese differ? [closed]

What are the dimensions along which English & Portuguese differ, and how are these dimensions of variation related and restricted?
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1answer
172 views

Is 'irrealis' not an official word? [closed]

I was trying to find an online audible audio pronuncer (ie vocaliser) for and the etymology of the word irrealis in irrealis mood. To my shock, the word is absent in OED, ODO, even Memidex.com. 1. ...
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1answer
148 views

Why do peoples(Europe, Asia, Africa, etc) call “God” in very similar ways? [closed]

UK: dieu(the motto on passport - French)/deity(English word) China: tien(Chinese Wade-Giles... t->d) South Africa: modimo(o->əʊ) New Zealand: atua(Maori... t->d) North America: tirawa(Pawnee... w->u t-...
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votes
2answers
189 views

Did people actually used poetic languages like Latin and Persian for basic spoken communication?

I can't help but notice the older generation frequently scolding the younger ones of corrupting the language by introducing words like lol, ASAP, brb, OMG, pj, etc. Indeed, with the astronomical ...
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0answers
30 views

How do you analyze the word “finance” as linguistic analysis? [closed]

By comparison with similar words either as synonym or only structurally.
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0answers
37 views

Borrowing And Spread Of European Proverbs

Proverbs are easily spread from one language to another and are conveyed through linguistic communication paths. (Wikipedia, 2021) Meider considers four possible sources of common proverbs in European ...
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votes
1answer
103 views

What are the title capitalization rules in some languages?

Specifically, for song titles. I know that in English all words are capitalized, except for short function words like “of”, “for” etc. and in Russian only the first word is capitalized, plus proper ...
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votes
1answer
126 views

what does broken formal languages mean?

I am learning Stanford CS224N: natural language processing with Deep Learning. Chris said "a little bit broken formal languages" in Lecture 1. what does that mean? can any one give a concrete ...
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votes
1answer
119 views

Advanced book for English Phonology?

pals. Does anyone know any advanced book(s) in Phonology of English and could give me a title/the titles, please? I am studying English Philology (so English is my 2nd language) and we've just ...
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votes
1answer
169 views

Hand gesture - Patting

I apologize if the following question is off-topic on this site. Some time ago, I was sitting at a table in a cafeteria/canteen. A few tables away, I saw someone I knew. This person also saw me and ...
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votes
1answer
176 views

Why do swear words mean the same thing in both English and Spanish (possibly more languages)

Earlier today, I was talking about swearing in other languages with some friends (this is a serious question, bear with me), so I decided to look up some lists of Spanish swear words for fun. This ...
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votes
1answer
114 views

Ex of Acronym, not Initialism, no vowels in form [closed]

I am wondering if there are any good examples of acronyms that are not initialisms which contain no vowels. Thanks!
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1answer
163 views

Can someone assist translating a handwritten note I found? Possible Devanagari script [closed]

EDITED: I found a handwritten note that was folded. I don't know where it came from. It was located in a trash can in my home. I live in rural United States. No one in my house claims to know where ...
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votes
1answer
805 views

'today announced' vs. '*yesterday announced'

In my grammar, 'Uber today announced a new invention' sounds fine but 'Uber yesterday announced a new invention' is marked if not ungrammatical. Any literature on this/explanations?
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votes
1answer
73 views

For what reason is the term “part of sentence” not considered a linguistic standard?

Whenever I browse through a book on grammar teaching of a particular language, there is a good chance I'll encounter the term "part of sentence". Actually, I can not remember having peeked into such a ...
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votes
1answer
156 views

Why is ‘karma’ cognate with ‘Britain’?

The word karma has Sanskrit origin. It ultimately comes from the PIE root *kʷer- which means "to do or make". The word karma is cognate with Britain. I know what the word karma means (good or bad ...
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votes
2answers
228 views

Names of the letters in the Latin script

I have noticed that the Spanish alphabet has the 26 letters + the consonant ñ, which is pronounced like the "ny" in "canyón". But out of the remaining 26 letters, I have noticed ...
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votes
2answers
234 views

Languages without orthographic stress marks that still have words that differ based on stress

Wondering about languages with stress that don't mark it orthographically. For example, the only two languages I know of that actually mark stress are Ancient Greek and Spanish. It seems that marking ...
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votes
1answer
416 views

In English, noun phrases within a relative clause cannot be further relativized, but this is allowed in some cases in Japanese

Japanese: Revised edition by Shoichi Iwasaki: In English, noun phrases within a relative clause cannot be further relativized, but this is allowed in some cases in Japanese. If there is such a ...
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2answers
1k views

What language is this and what does it mean in English? [closed]

Please help identify what this means in English. I cannot read this language and cannot determine what language it is.
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3answers
197 views

Why do some written languages have multiple symbols for a single sound?

For some written languages, there are multiple symbols to stand for one sound. Here are a few examples: tibetan ཨ [a] ⟨ꞏa⟩ འ [a] ⟨ʼa⟩ hebrew ך [χ] כ [...
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1answer
85 views

How definitive are “patterns” in grammar across languages?

So when you learn a new language from English like Spanish in school, they make it seem like "hey there's these clear patterns and rules once learned you'll master spanish". So you learn the verb ...
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votes
2answers
116 views

Are Old Slavonic “шкурка” and “корица” related to Italian “scorza”?

Could Old Slavonic nouns “шкурка” (shkurka) and “корица”(koritsa) be derived from Italian “scorza”(En. peel)? I have already looked them up in M. Vasmer's "Etymological dictionary of Russian language"...
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votes
1answer
170 views

Why are anaphonic antonyms regarded as chance by many linguistic historians

Why are anaphonic antonyms regarded as chance by many linguistic historians, if this could be regarded as an Ancient mnemonic method of creating a logical and easy inverted spelling of antonyms? ...
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votes
1answer
238 views

Was sanskrit first complex language [closed]

I believe a complex language in necessary for a religious ideology involving man, mind, awareness, material world, immaterial world and such to be passed on. Was sanskrit the first language that was ...
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votes
1answer
78 views

what is out of context thinking called [closed]

In the movie "pursuit of happiness" this particular exchange happens Martin Frohm: What would you say if man walked in here with no shirt, and I hired him? What would you say? Chris Gardner: ...
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votes
2answers
144 views

Does “a” in “I made a mistake” denote indefiniteness? [closed]

I made a mistake. Here, "a" is called the indefinite article in contrast with the definite article "the". But does "a" in this sentence denote indefiniteness? As far as I can tell, "a" is needed ...
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votes
4answers
163 views

What is the most universally understood way to represent the “ay” sound of “CAKE” substituting the standard a for a single character?

I am making up an imaginary word to be used as a name. Right now I seem to have it ending in "tata", but want it to be clear it is pronounced as "tay-tah" not "tah-tah" I admit that I do not know my ...
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votes
1answer
75 views

The Proto-Germanic vowel “e” changes to the English “i”

What is the name of a sound shift law under which the Proto-Germanic vowel "e" changes to the English "i", e.g. *fehtaną (fechten) -> fight; *rehtaz (recht) -> right
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1answer
120 views

What would be the obstacles to creating a language composed of all the words of all the human languages existing today? [closed]

So this is an question I haven't tried to answer/solve too much before posting, mainly because it's more of a game and exercise in creativity and wanted to have many opinions. So clearly this task of ...
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votes
3answers
226 views

How to find origin of a borrowed word?

For example what is the origin of name Catherine? Etymology Dictionary says that: it's from French Catherine, from Medieval Latin Katerina, from Latin Ecaterina, from Greek Aikaterine. The -h- was ...
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votes
1answer
89 views

Semitic and Hebrew etymology

Semitic has historically been used to describe ancient languages spanning from Oman to Morocco through Egypt and Somalia. Today, Antisemitic is different to it's etymology, it doesnt refer to berber ...
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votes
1answer
73 views

Are these English judges using 'linguistics' correctly? [closed]

I don't feel these English judges are using "linguistics" correctly, because they're just working with the English language, not doing linguistics! Some of them have a degree in classics, but I don't ...
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votes
1answer
916 views

Is to always a preposition? [closed]

[1] I am looking forward to seeing you. [2] I want to see you. In the sentence [1] we say that to is a preposition. followed by a gerund. In [2] we say to is a particle ...
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votes
1answer
54 views

Research in psychiatry

My research is not linguistics pers se, it is placed in psychiatry, and my problem and question is the French etymology concerning the word psychiatry in French
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votes
2answers
71 views

How should the `y` in `Hornby` be pronounced [closed]

How should the y in [Hornby][1] be pronounced, as the I in I'm, or as the ee in honey-bee? What is the English rule that governs the above?
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votes
1answer
353 views

Which noun phrases within relative clauses can be [further relativized]?

The term [further relativized] appears in an academic monograph. See: https://linguistics.stackexchange.com/a/19839/13923 This doesn't seem to be a generally-used term, but I'll use it here. This ...
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votes
2answers
191 views

Can a new alphabet be created and added to the English language? [closed]

Does the English language, or any other language for that matter provide the flexibility to add or remove new alphabets?
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votes
2answers
215 views

How to solve 48÷2(9+3) from a linguistics perspective? [closed]

Suppose an alien life comes to Earth, and challenges us to answer a question that will allow them do determine if we can communicate without ambiguities and solve controversies in a rational way. The ...
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votes
1answer
113 views

Non-standard English spelling and other things in 18th century writing — how much due to quill pens?

I was just thinking how even in books and newspapers prior to the computer age, like in the 1950s and before, there were a lot of errors that are glaring now but I am sure were accepted then. So I ...
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votes
1answer
87 views

Transliteration/Transcription of מְלאוּפּם [closed]

Notice that there is no vowel point under the פּ. This should probably be considered to be because of the fact that Hebrew is usually written without vowels, but I've never seen it written with a ...

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