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Code code:"if (foo != bar)"
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body:"apples oranges"
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request for references of languages that satisfy the criteria set in the question.

2
votes
In Vietnamese I don't think there's a direct equivalent of to be in English, but there are some words to describe the meanings like @bytebuster said: an object x is a part of set X: là, e.g. "đây là …
answered Sep 12 '14 by Lưu Vĩnh Phúc
1
vote
0answers
In Japanese they use 分, 厘, 毛, 糸, 忽, 微, 繊, 沙, 塵, 埃 for negative powers of 10 from 10-1 to 10-10 respectively There's also another system with a little bit different value range https://en.wikiped …
asked Aug 19 '17 by Lưu Vĩnh Phúc
5
votes
Nearly all languages have at least three phonemic vowels, usually /i/, /a/, /u/ as in Classical Arabic and Inuktitut (or /ɐ/, /ɪ/, /ʊ/ as in Quechua), though Adyghe and many Sepik languages have a …
answered Sep 28 '15 by Lưu Vĩnh Phúc
3
votes
Vietnamese uses numbers for both months and weekdays January: Tháng 1 February: Tháng 2 ... December: Tháng 12 For weekdays Monday → Thứ hai (2nd day of week) Tuesday → Thứ ba (3 …
answered Sep 2 '14 by Lưu Vĩnh Phúc
3
votes
In Vietnamese there are 2 types of "we": inclusive we: "chúng ta", to address the speaker, the person spoken to, and maybe others if any exclusive we: "chúng tôi", to address the speaker and others, …
answered Sep 24 '15 by Lưu Vĩnh Phúc
12
votes
Vietnamese names, like Chinese, have no specific name set. So the choice depends on the parents or the person who gives the name. They can choose any syllable they like to combine into the name. But o …
answered Oct 7 '13 by Lưu Vĩnh Phúc