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8 votes
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What's the relationship between harmonics and formants?

why the harmonic frequencies are integer multiples of the fundamental frequency? Physics! Pretty much all of the physical processes that create vibrations at a base frequency, also create vibrations ...
Draconis's user avatar
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6 votes

Why were the formants of high and back vowels difficult to obtain? And why not anymore?

Is point 2 above still true? Not any more, thankfully! If not, why was it so difficult? Back when this paper was written, spectrograms of sound were right on the cutting edge of technology. They ...
Draconis's user avatar
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5 votes

Is it possible to recognize place of articulation of consonants through spectrograms?

It is possible, in principle, to distinguish consonant place of articulation with spectrograms, within certain limits of precision, but only given certain prior knowledge. It used to be a standard ...
user6726's user avatar
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5 votes

Formant frequencies of consonants

All segments were given an acoustic definition in the feature theories of Jakobson, Fant & Halle (1951) and Jakobson & Halle (1956). Many of the features were passed down to Chomsky & ...
user6726's user avatar
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4 votes
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How do people discern different plosives without formant transition?

Richard Wright discusses this w.r.t. Tsou, which has a number of initial stop clusters, e.g. pka:ko "to escape", tpihi "mend cloth" (and other kinds of clusters, but stop clusters are the most ...
user6726's user avatar
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4 votes

Acoustic signal to phones?

Phones are a "thing" because they were the first decent method of objectively and accurately recording unwritten languages (in the 19th century). Back then, if you heard a Lushootseed speaker ...
user6726's user avatar
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4 votes
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What's the acoustic difference between laterals and nasals

This may be a useful overview, also this (ultimately, Johnson “Acoustic and Auditory Phonetics” chapter 9, not online). Nasals have anti-formants at 1100 Hz and 3300 Hz, laterals at 2100 Hz, and the ...
user6726's user avatar
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4 votes
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Formant frequencies of consonants

Unfortunately, the answer is no. The space of vowels is continuous: given any two vowels, you can find a midpoint between them, and that's also a perfectly valid vowel that people can pronounce. But ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes

Voicing Into Closure? [segmentation, waveform and spectrogram form Praat]

Your spectrogram is not clear. You should use a narrow-band spectrogram to see formants efficiently. So change your settings. To obtain this visualisation, you should use a small window length as it ...
amegnunsen's user avatar
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4 votes

Why does /zd-/ require more effort even though both the consonants have the same voicing?

This is just a subjective feeling that really depends on your native language or the languages you are used to speaking. Other languages are fine with this particular combination. For example, in my ...
Vladimir F Героям слава's user avatar
3 votes

How to read a spectrogram?

In the first spectrogram you can see two different segments /S1-S1-S2/ the third segment seems an strident sound "s, sh" or something similar (because it shows an extremely turbulent ...
Davius's user avatar
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3 votes

How harmonic is speech?

I'm not aware of any work on this topic in linguistic phonetics, but there may be something out there in musical acoustics for voice. The main problem for quantifying inharmonicity is detecting ...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes
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What is the unit of the amplitude on the y-axis in a sound waveform?

None of the above. The waveform display program shows the raw sampled numbers (not anything in decibels), but there can also be an intensity curve, in dB, superimposed on the waveform display. In ...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes

What are the features that distinguish a velar /k/ from an uvular /q/ in a spectrogram?

This is somewhat surprisingly hard to determine. The best study on the topic that I know of is Denzer-King's study of Tlingit. The basic strategy is to compare the frequency and amplitude of higher ...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes

Sentence stress detection

Searching online returns quite a few results, some of which are quite tailored to your needs: Tepperman, J., & Narayanan, S. (2005, March). Automatic syllable stress detection using prosodic ...
WavesWashSands's user avatar
3 votes

Sentence stress detection

I also don't know of any ready-made tool that does this. It would be very helpful to know roughly what you were hoping to use this for, since that would dictate exactly what kind of tool you would ...
phsyron's user avatar
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2 votes

Measuring phonetic correlates of stress (intensity in particular)

I assume your goal is to describe the acoustics of "stress accent" in a language, distinguishing between stressed and unstressed syllables. Then you would treat amplitude and F0 in basically the same ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes

Rare diphthongs

The basic phonetic property explaining this rareness is that the sounds are too similar. You can add to the list things like [iɪ], [ɛe] and so on, where there is also just a subtle shift in F1 or F2 ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes
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Why can increasing the speed of closing the vocal folds increases the loudness?

This picture may be useful (likewise this article). The thing of interest is the glottal flow derivative, modeled in this paper (fig. 2 has an analogous graph). The flow derivative is held to be the ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes
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Acoustic parameters for phonation

Voicing is defined as the semi-periodic vibration of the vocal folds. Accordingly, you look to see if there is something that happens repeatedly at a reasonably low but not ridiculously low frequency, ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes
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Unmoving F1 / formant below F1?

This is H0, or, the fundamental. Looking at a spectral slice (at various positions) and comparing the computed F0, you can see that this happens at about 230 Hz. The prominence of the fundamental is a ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes

Why do retroflex and postalveolar fricatives sound so similar despite the quite different positions of the tongue?

Both the retroflex and postalveolar fricatives are sibilants and are therefore louder than other consonants. /ʃ/ and /ʂ/ are the two lowest pitched among sibilants. Urdu inherited Sanskrit /ʂ/ as /ʃ/ ...
b a's user avatar
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2 votes

The reason for a partly voiced hold in I’d

You need to frame this as a broader and testable question, and the investigation has to be conducted with some underlying theory of what might be happening. I think you can probably control speaker, ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes
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Distinguishing between [s] and [ʪ] in spectrogram

You will probably have to dig elsewhere to find actual data on lateral lisps. One large caveat is that you can't compare children and adults, and the data on characteristic properties of phonemes will ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes
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Why does /zd-/ require more effort even though both the consonants have the same voicing?

The broadest generalization is that, whatever is systematically lacking in your language, that thing is hard to do. If your language has no [ʁ], it is hard for you to produce [ʁ]. If words do not ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes

Voice Onset Time, Onsets, Codas, and Pre- & Post-Aspiration

Voice onset time is a convenient measurement that can be used to compare aspirated, tenuis, and voiced stops to each other, since across different languages (or across different contexts within a ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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1 vote

Distinguishing between [s] and [ʪ] in spectrogram

I do not know any speech pathology. Judging from descriptions online, it seems like a lateral lisp [ʪ] is a production of /s/ with lateral airflow, which would make it a lot similar to the /ɬ/ phoneme ...
melissa_boiko's user avatar
1 vote

How to measure auditory distances between vowels

Although auditory equidistance is foundational in the cardinal vowel system, it is widely known that this is a problematically unvalidated concept. Peter Ladefoged made this point a few times. Here is ...
user6726's user avatar
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1 vote

Should I include this piece in the vowel? [spectrogram]

It seems good. The vocal folds continue to vibrate a little bit after your boundary, even though the tongue and the lips were already articulating a stop, but it is just a coarticulation phenomenon. ...
amegnunsen's user avatar
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1 vote

Voicing Into Closure? [segmentation, waveform and spectrogram form Praat]

This is probably background noise. To check this, compare a section with no speech. For example, during closure of /p/ you can get very strong apparent "coarticulation" from preceding /a/ where the ...
user6726's user avatar
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