6

IPA is used to render the pronunciation of a word, so NATO is [ˈnɛɪtʰɔʊ], JPEG is [ˈdʒeɪpɛɡ] and so on. Some people pronounce NATO as [ˈnɛɪɾɔʊ], in which case you'd use a different transcription. IPA isn't a spelling system / general-purpose writing system, it's used to represent pronunciation, thus it doesn't matter if you write IRA or I.R.A (but it does ...


5

One famous example in such respect is the name of Pakistan, which however was coined purposedly when it became an independent nation. It comes from an acronym formed from the names of the five northern provinces of the British India: Punjab, Afghan Province, Kashmir, Sind, and Baluchistan (see here). The i vowel was inserted for euphonic purposes. However, ...


4

It is not an acronym. It is what Lewis Carroll called a portmanteau word. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portmanteau


4

As far as I know, there's no standard term for this. But depending how they came about, these matches might be cases of: Cognate acronyms (acronyms in related languages being the same or similar because the words in those languages are the same or similar) False cognate acronyms (acronyms that look the same by pure coincidence, and are actually unrelated) ...


4

There's no reason to think that יהוה is an acronym (or a portmanteau, though that part of the question isn't clear to me), given that (1) his name presumably predates the Semitic alphabet, (2) it certainly predates by millennia the widespread use of acronyms in Jewish tradition, and (3) the supposed components of the acronym don't make sense in terms of ...


3

It would be classified as neither. Icons literally resemble what they stand for. For example, a globe is an icon to the extent that it literally resembles Earth. No such resemblance exists between an acronym and that which it stands for. An index literally resembles an effect or thing affected by what it stands for. For example, a symbol that ...


2

Generally, the word acronym is used to describe words/initialisms which use only the initial letter(s)/syllables of the original phrase: An acronym is a word or name formed as an abbreviation from the initial components in a phrase or a word, usually individual letters (as in NATO or laser) and sometimes syllables (as in Benelux). So, hypothetical 'Brex' ...


2

There's a wiki list of geographic acronyms and initialisms for this (I should know, since I compiled it) but only a few (if any) qualify as being a replacement name for the longer term. Perhaps sometime in the future New Orleans may officially be changed to NOLA. And I'm unsure if Soweto (South West Townships) and Nemato (Nelson Mandela Township) were ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible