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29 votes
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What is the idea behind calling the adverb the garbage can of words?

Traditional grammarians going all the way back to Donatus are accused of classifying as adverb any word they couldn't make fit anywhere else in the canonical parts of speech. It's a very old ...
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10 votes
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Are there languages that inflect adverbs for gender

Although adverb agreement in gender/noun class is far from ubiquitous, there seem to be (apparent) examples of this kind of agreement in a fair number of languages. I am most familiar with examples of ...
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8 votes
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What kind of phrase is "until recently"?

Your 'rules' mix traditional and contemporary grammars. It's true in both traditional and contemporary grammars that a preposition phrase [PP] consists of a preposition and an object; but in ...
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6 votes

Does any language conjugate adverbs?

I'm not sure about conjuation in specific, but inflection of adverbs is definitely possible. There are numerous examples in various languages: English: can man travel faster than light German: kann ...
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6 votes

What really makes adverbs different from adjectives?

If we step off linguistic terminology to some philosophy, everything becomes more straightforward. Adjectives define properties of "things"; Adverbs define properties of "relations". TL;DR Human ...
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  • 8,501
6 votes
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Is the adverbial phrase and adverb phrase identical?

Short answer An adverb phrase is best thought of as a phrase headed by an adverb, in the same way that a preposition phrase is a phrase headed by a preposition and so forth. An 'Adverbial' is a ...
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6 votes

Is the adverbial phrase and adverb phrase identical?

I very much dislike the term "adverbial". I think it is very unsatisfactory to have a function term that is morphologically derived from a category term. Adverb is a word category, and adverb phrase (...
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5 votes
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Is there a term for words that modify the intensity of something

They are called intensifiers. This term is pretty widespread, and I couldn't think of another.
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5 votes

-wise, -mente, -ment: How many languages use the "mind" metaphor for adjectives made adverbs?

Quite a few, and they mostly inherited it from Proto-Romance. In Classical Latin (the Latin written by Vergil and Cicero), there were a few different ways of forming adverbs, using the suffixes -e and ...
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4 votes

Why can verbs with imperfective morphology have a perfective meaning?

The examples you chose are not particularly fortunate but the problem you're alluding to is one commonly encountered when it comes to aspect or tense. For instance, present tense is often used to ...
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4 votes

What part of speech is "probably", and how can it be substituted?

It's an adverb, since it is used between the parts of the compound verbal predicate; since there is the adjective 'probable', and an adjective + the '-ly' suffix produces an adverb; and since it ...
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  • 15.4k
4 votes

Difference between particle and adverb in English

Things are called particles when they undergo the rule Particle Shift. "Particle" is an ad hoc POS made up to fill the need for a notation to use to describe when the rule works. It is not a happy ...
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  • 12.3k
4 votes

Is the word "here" a preposition?

"Here" is not a preposition per se. By definition, prepositions come before a noun phrase (or determiner phrase) to create prepositional phrases: He was (in (the house)). They saw him (with ...
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4 votes
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Do other languages than English have verbals ,too?

At least, other Indogermanic languages have the ability to derive nouns from verbs, too. In Latin, there is a suffix -tio, -tionis that forms abstract nouns (like derivatio "derivation" from derivare),...
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4 votes

Are there languages that inflect adverbs for gender

In Bantu languages, adverbs are often inflected for noun cl. 8, for example Shona ndakáryá zvi-díkí "I ate a bit" with the cl 8 form of "small" (-díkí), Swahili unaongea kiswahili vi-zuri "you speak ...
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4 votes
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What are the pros and cons of having adjectives appear first?

Which approach allows for the transfer of a higher amount of information bits per second? This is, as it turns out, a question that can be answered experimentally: neither. Coupé, Oh, Dediu, and ...
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  • 51k
3 votes

'Before'/'after' as a spatial metaphor: is the opposite possible?

We imagine the time flowing at us from our front to our back, so the future is in front of us and the past is behind us, for us the time flows from the future into the past. I don't know about all the ...
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  • 15.4k
3 votes

Difference between particle and adverb in English

The following illustrates my second answer to this question, which is that "particles" have no part of speech. Earlier descriptions of subcategorization In that first generation of great young ...
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  • 12.3k
3 votes

Did the Greek adverb for "late" evolve into a preposition meaning "after"?

ὀψέ has survived in Modern Cypriot Greek, as the adverb ψες "last night". (The deletion of initial unstressed o- is semi-regular; the addition of final -s to adverbs is also semi-regular.) "late" > "(...
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3 votes

Phrases and clauses used as an adverb, and hence don't take a preposition

The answer to this question has (again) to do with the argument vs. adjunct distinction. Often the term complement is used in place of argument, although the argument notion is more clearly defined. ...
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  • 5,280
3 votes

What is the part of speech of 'modifiers to adjectives'?

In standard average European languages and also in classical Latin and Greek, there is no new part of speech for a modifier of an adjective or adverb, it is just an adverb. I don't know whether there ...
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3 votes
Accepted

Are there languages in which adverbs inflect?

Yes, there are supposed to be some languages that have adverbs that show inflectional agreement with the head verb. I don't know enough to give an overview, but one example seems to be Maori, where ...
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2 votes
Accepted

NPs as adverbials; how to parse them?

I would render the X' node as NP; the noun feet is head of the phrase 5 feet. So yes, the NP 5 feet appears as a predependent of the adjective tall, i.e. it appears on a left branch underneath the ...
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  • 5,280
2 votes

Did the Greek adverb for "late" evolve into a preposition meaning "after"?

It was actually used in both ways by Philostratos (e.g. Vita Apollonii: τὰς δὲ εὐεργεσίας ὀψὲ διδόναι). But I think we may call it a personal way of expression or a local variant, rather than an ...
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2 votes

What really makes adverbs different from adjectives?

Their definition is very general: adverbs are distinguished from adjectives, which modify nouns, by saying that ‘adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs’ You have (mostly) answered ...
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2 votes
Accepted

Adverbs vs intensifiers

Categories are defined on the basis of distributional equivalence, so there are two possibilities here. Your professor thinks that intensifier is a better name for this particular category than ...
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  • 1,144
2 votes

Colloquial use of adjective that is actually acting as an adverb -- examples or formal use?

Wow, the example is indeed probably offensive to some, and I apologize in advance to anyone who is offended by the fact that I am now going to risk an answer. I agree with the question's premise ...
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2 votes
Accepted

Is it sensible to ask for the lemma of an adverb?

If adverbs are an independent part of speech that cannot be inflected, it follows from the definitions you give (which I also checked in Wikipedia), that any adverb is trivially its own lemma. That ...
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  • 1,487
2 votes

Difference between particle and adverb in English

There’s no difference, as you put it, since particles are mainly prepositions. "Particle" is not a distinct word category (part of speech) as such, but a term used for certain words that have the ...
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  • 780

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