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9 votes
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What prevents certain grammatical forms to be analysed as one word?

It is not arbitrary, but it is very theory-dependent. One popular criterion for affix-hood is that affixes tend to affix to a particular word-class, thus if you treat "an" as an affix, you would ...
user6726's user avatar
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7 votes
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Are the hebrew prefix letters (משה וכלב) considered a form of agglutination?

These morphemes (ve "and", kshe "when", etc.) are in linguistic terms actually not prefixes, but proclitics. You can read more about the distinction between affixes and clitics here. Agglutination ...
TKR's user avatar
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6 votes

Are fusional languages easier to learn than isolating languages?

L1 difficulty It is not at all obvious that it even means anything to say that one language is harder to learn (as L1) than another. If some language were really so hard that children simply didn't ...
user6726's user avatar
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5 votes

How agglutinative languages affect comprehension

If you're curious about agglutination, look at English derivation. For example, suppose you'd never heard the word "unapproachable" before. You could quite easily break it down into un-approach-able. ...
Draconis's user avatar
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5 votes

What prevents certain grammatical forms to be analysed as one word?

It's generally assumed that you can't stick material of arbitrary length and near-abitrary content into the middle of a word. As mentioned in Yellow Sky's comment, we can say, in addition to "an apple"...
brass tacks's user avatar
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4 votes

What prevents certain grammatical forms to be analysed as one word?

Words are the minimal forms that speakers memorize. (There might be exceptions to that general principle.) There are several peculiarities of words not shared by other expressions, but so far as I ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
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4 votes
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Example of language with lots of agglutination/fusion/inflection without a lot of regularity

Look at verbs in Ancient Greek, the older the better (since it regularized over time). In Ancient Greek, affixes on the stem indicate tense, voice, and mood. For example, e-le-ly-k-ei means "he had ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes

How agglutinative languages affect comprehension

In English we might say "They walked onto the dry, green grass in the middle of the day.". It is a bunch of words stringed together. In an agglutinative language, This example will not tell ...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar
4 votes
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Why is Hungarian considered a mostly agglutinative language?

You're completely correct that Hungarian verb conjugation is quite fusional, but even there it's at most on par with IE languages. You mention Spanish, which does have a relatively neat TAM marker + ...
user54748's user avatar
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4 votes

Do Turkish sentences have to ever "fall back" to using extra words instead of using suffixes?

I can't speak for Turkish, but I suspect your question is more general than that. In some languages, these "suffixes" are case markers, which show agreement (so you basically put the marker ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes
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Do Turkish sentences have to ever "fall back" to using extra words instead of using suffixes?

Yes, there are plenty of modifiers in Turkish that are standalone words, like prepositions and postpositions, not suffixes. Often a similar idea can be expressed with either a suffix or a standalone ...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar
3 votes

How do speakers of languages which can form arbitrary long words deal with long words?

The only agglutinative language I can speak is Kannada and from my understanding of how native speakers of Kannada deal with agglutination, they do not find it more "difficult" or "...
sriganesh's user avatar
3 votes

Are there right-branching agglutinative languages?

Elamite is agglutinative and (mainly) right-branching, though quotative phrases are left branching. https://archive.org/stream/TheElamiteLanguage1969/Reiner1969TheElamiteLanguagetext#page/n15/mode/...
fdb's user avatar
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2 votes

Do case endings really make sentences shorter?

There is not much saving (of words, syllables, or phonemes) in simple sentences. Case endings allow for a pro-drop language saving one word in a simple sentence, and saving adpositions is also a minor ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
2 votes
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What should go into a dictionary in heavily agglutinative languages?

I assume you mean "electronic dictionary", and I assume infinite programming skills, plus access to recording facilities and speakers. Such a dictionary needs to be paired with a grammar (...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes

Why is Hungarian considered a mostly agglutinative language?

This raises a factual question, namely whether Hungarian is often used as the prototypical example of a heavily agglutinative, synthetic language. In my experience, Turkish is the "prototypical&...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes

When do you go from morpheme to word to sentence in agglutinative languages?

Some sentences require a definition, for example "a stitch in time saves nine". Phonemes also have definitions, it's just that the definitions are in terms of something "else" – I ...
user6726's user avatar
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1 vote

In agglutinative languages with long "sentence words", how do they conceptualize of these "words" and their parts?

The "long words" (certainly for Thai and Lao) represent clauses. In Thai, no punctuation, aside from an occasional question mark or quotation marks, is in common use. The word space ...
Biblasia's user avatar
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1 vote

Do Turkish sentences have to ever "fall back" to using extra words instead of using suffixes?

If there are a few adjectives and a noun, then you put the suffix in the end of the noun. If there is a possessive adjective in English and you are trying to translate it into Turkish, you put the ...
Mala Vuran's user avatar
1 vote

Sound Changes concerning Vowel Harmony

One well-known example is the changes to vowel harmony in Korean, from the Middle Korean period (13th-15th centuries) to the modern day. In Late Middle Korean, the yang/bright vowels were ㅏ /a/, ㆍ /ʌ/ ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
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1 vote

Are there right-branching agglutinative languages?

I'm unsure by what we even mean by "mainly" or "mostly" right- or left-branching in a comparative context. I mean, sure, I can see how Japanese is mainly left-branching; but if by "left-branching" we ...
melissa_boiko's user avatar

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